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Full text of "The history of the world"

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85 [Raleigh (Sir Walter)] The History of the World, first edition, with 
errata uncorrected, 2 parts in one vol., engraved allegorical title-page and 8 double- 
page engraved maps {one inserted from a smaller copy), device at end, margins of first 
few leaves repaired slightly affecting the engraved title, some damp stains, contem- 
porary inscription at end "Laus Deo Henry Boughton", extensive marginal notes 
throughout in his hand and 2 blank pages at the end of part 1 filled with a disquisition 
by him headed "Westminster Hall or our looking at Lawiers", also signed by him (on 
p. 145) "pret - 30s. II Nou 1614", folio, modern sheep with crimson label, William 
Stansby for Walter Burre, 1614 f 32S 

Printed title-page from the 1617 edition with portrait of Raleigh inserted. 
STC 20637; Pforzheimer Cat. Ill, no. 820. 





A\ O QC<L LXVIM 






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THE MIND EOF 



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' i^W2_> Death anddar^e Obliuion (»m*£ tht-> fam€\ 
1 7#£ Ad iftrefle of M ans \\k,grme^ Hifhm^ 
^Raffing the World to good, or Euillfame, » 
T>oth Vindicate it to JEternitie, 

High Prouidence would fo : that nor the good 
tSA/Tigbt be defrauded,nor the (jreatfecurd, 
"But both might {now their wayes are '^nderjlood, 
oyfndthe regard, and punifhment afsur'd. 

This makes, that lighted by the beamie hand 
Of Truth, whichfearcheth the mofi hidden firings, 
And guided by Experience,**^ fir eight wand 
'Doth mete, whofe Line doth found the depth of things : 

Shee chearefully fupporteth whatflieereares • 
Afijledby nojlrengths, but arc her oWne > 
Some note of which each -varied Pillar beares, 
"By which as proper titles fhee ulmowne, 

Times witnefle, Herald of/Wiquitie, 
The light of Truth, and lik of Memorie. 



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HISTORIE OF 

THE WORLD. 

IN FIVE BOOKES. 

\ ttonunto Abraham. c J am ^frofntbe^rea. 

Of the Times from the Birth of Abraham #• » U i n «• . 
7>*/>fc 0/ Salomon. ADraham > " '*' «ty?™&«i o/W* 

From afc %ekne of Philip of Mac J n T i 5 M Macedon. 
From rfe fettled rule of Alexanders Sueceffbrs in tU F*fi .71 1 « 
BySirW ALTER R^ £Gr4jKnj , 








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THE PREFACE. 

Ow rvnft, and how unworthy a choice Ihaue made of my 
J elf, to undertake a worke of this mixtur^ *, n m . 
reafon, though exceeding weake, bathfufficiently refolded 
me. For had it beene begotten then with my fir (I dawne 
, of day, -token the light of common knowledge began to open 
ttfelfeao mjyonger yearn: and before any wound recemed , either from 
Fortuneph^ .- Imigbtyet_wellbauedoubted,thattbedarke«e(feof 
A^^DeatbypouldhauecoueredoiierbothltandMe^Jongbeforethe 
Performance. ?or,begmnj^witbtheCreatio»:Ihaueprocecdedwitbtbe 
fftoryopheWorld;andlafilypurpofed(fomefer,fa!liesexcepted)tocor^ 
. fine my difcourfe^ , within this our renowned Hand of Great Britraine 
Jconfejfe that it hai better forted with my disability, the better part of 
whofe times arjjunnt outjnotberjrauail^ to haue fet together ( as I 

^ld)the^nioyntedMfcamredframeof OW Englif } a^mes,thanofthe 

rvmuerfaH: mwhome hadtbere beeneno other defeaf (who am aUdefa) 

then the time of the day , it were enough ; the day of a temtefluous life, 

drawneon totbeyery emnhgere Ibegan. But thofe inmofl , tmdM^ 

P''r^o im ds, w bichareemrakingwhileyneure^whhthe 

fiethofe few friends, which Ibm tried by the fire of aduerfitie ■ 'thefor- 

^frcmgMatterperfwadmg^ 

legible, andmyfelfetheSubieaofeueryopinionwifeorweak^ 

To the world Ipre^ttbem.iLwhid I amnothingindebted ; neither 
^°^rsthatwere,(Fortim^cban g ing^ 

For Profperity and Aduerfity haue em-more tied and untied vulgar 

i anions. And as we fee it in experience, That dogs doe alwaiesbarke at '", , c 

) thofe theyknownot; and that it is intheir nature fo accompany one another Vfe^^T 

mtboe clamours : fo is it With the inconf derate multitude. Who, wm- P* ^'7 ~ '#* * 

t ^^tr V ertuewhi c bw:ecall^(lyinanmen,andthateJpecian,ifiof 

• bOQ Which we call Charity in CBrJWan men \ tondemne. without he arim- 

Uf r a whichhu Maieny truly acknowledged for the Author of all lies. Blame ^ u 

noman( (ajth Siracides) before thou haue inquired the matter • vn **««*7 
dcrfiand firft , andthen reforme ri^bteoufly. Rumor, resfine'tefle, 

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fneiudic^maligna,fallax } Rumor is without witnetTe,without ludge, 
malicious and deceiueabte. This vanity of vulgar opinion it -waijhat 
u* mi HA&me St. Auguftine Argument to affirme, That he feared the praife of good 
'£*%,%"»?- men, and detefted that oftheeuiH. Andheereinno manhath gmen a better 
VZ**' "' r .de,then;his o/Seneca ; Confcientia: fatisfaciamus : nihil infamam 
a***. .-.3 labc ; remus , fcquatur v ^i mala.dum bene merearis. Letvs (atisfieour 

•>( ovvne confciences, and not trouble our felues with fame ; be it neuer • I 
To ill, it i j to be defpifed To we deferuc well. 

For myfelfe, iflhaue in any thing ferued my Country, andprifedit before 
mypriuate: the general acceptation canyeeld me no other profit at this timet 
tbm doth a f aire fun/bine day to a Sea- man after fhipwrach,andthe contrary 
no other bar me than an outragious tempeft after the port attained. I know 
that I loft the lone of many, for my fidelity to-wardes Her, whom Jmuftftill g A . 
honor in the duft } though further than the defence of Her excelleptperfonj 
neuer perfequuted any man. Ofthoje that did it, and by what deuce they did 
it : He that is the Supreame Iudge of all thefporld, hath taken the accompt-, 
r :0frs ■foasfor'tbisHndojfnft^ \( 

par:a, ddefhu. 
As jar owermen ; if there be any thathaue made thmfehes Fathers of 
^L that fame, "which hath beene begotten for them : I can neither enuy at fucb 
their purchased glory-, nor much lament mineo-wne miftap in that kind- t but ' 
content my fife toj,\y with Virgil, Sic vos non vob/s,/« many particulars.. 

To labour other Jatisfaclion,"Wereaneffe£i of phre»^.ie,not of hope: feeing • 
it is not Truth, but Opinion, that can traitaile the vorldycithoutapafeport. y * 
For "Were it othevwife \Andwere there not as many hit email formes of the 
minde, as there are extern^ figures of men ; there -were thenfomepoftbili" 
tj, toper/wade by the mouth of one Aduoeate,euen Equity alone. 
lH ^ h . JSutJlub is the multiplying and extenfiue a'ertue of dead Earth, and of 
ih.it breath- gluing life -which GOD hath caft vpon Slime and Duft : as 
that among tboje that were , of whom "We reade ant heare, and among thofe 
that are, -whom -we fee and conuerfe -with ; euery one hath reamed a feuer all 
pitTure of face, andeuerie one a diuerfe piclure of minde • euery one a forme 
ap.;rt, euery one a fancy and cogitation (Tigering -.there being nothing -where^ 
in Nature fo much trhmphetb,as in difimilitude,From "whence it commeth y • 
th.iifbere is found fo great diner fry of opinions ; foftrong a contrariety of \ 
- > inclinations ; fo many natural! and vnnaturall - 3 wife, fooli/h ; manly, and 
chi!dijbaffc7iont,andpaJ?tons in Mortal! Men. Foritisnot theyjfihlefa^ 
jhionandjjjape of plants, and of rea finable Creatures, that makes the diffe- 
rence,of-workingintbeow,andof condition in the other ybutthefomein- 
ternall. 

And though it hath pleafed GOD, to referue the Art of reading mens 
thoughts tuhimjelfe :jet, as thefrmt telsthenameof the Tree jfo doe the 

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whereof to guefeattberejf. Nay , itwere not hard 'toexWethe one by\ 

andtbeworldsloueinall teach euery capacity , accordin£mhe compact \ 
hath,tomahfieandmaskeouatheirinmrddef om itiesforatime Though 
ttbealjotrue, Ncmopoteftiuperfonamfcrrcfiaam: citoinnatu 
ram fuam readmit, quibus Veritas non fubeft.~Noman can 
ong continue masked in a counterfeit behauiour : the things 
hat are forced for pretences, hauing no ground of truth, cannot 
long diflemble their owne natures. jfcifl&rt- r Mj , J^V f aith p lu _ 

Inthis great difcor d and dipmilitude of reafonable creatures, if wee 
dire£t ourjeluestothe Multitude • Omnis honeftz rei malus index eft 

whofe.%ifdome ( /&** £„/«^ ) istobeedefpifed • iftetheleZ 
fort; every ynderfianding bath a peculiar iudgmem, by Uh it bo heel 
fureth other men, and^lueth itjelfe. AnMerefi ^me e ltZ 

WtBrnWC^erstfaw i ^eJotfpiedtota X etheR.l 
rendFatbenoftheChurcb, mtb Ambition; tbefeuereftmentothcmfelues, 
• JgSBfflfo thegreateftlouers of Iuttice^ith Popularity JdthoCe 
' ires ll Z al ° Urand f°ff{*> -vitbrvaine-glorie. BuLfthefeL^,,, 
tures^bicbheinvaytto findefault , and to turne good into euill, Ln^nr « 
Salomon complained long fince rand that theyeryage of the I orl Tnt^A 

^approuedcuftomeofthofe who haue left the memories of time pafitl 

hau7ZTr7r' "T^T* ^f^igktoHiftoj^hfchthey 
hauedone. ret feeing therein I/houldbut borrm otbePmTnfwordes , J 

SS ° therb Z e ^ f0Y , Whkh ithMh honored; inthUone it triul 
t^bouerallhumanekno w ledg e , That it hath giuenw life in our i^afe 

lLeZ:tlt° J rt r ^ md ^ n fofaire andpeircingeiestoour 

7£^V^£ l t Mlb ** m '> ^ifwebadliuedtben, tbrt 

oZkxc n T Da ^P^ 5 ° PUS ' thC Wife Wor M/^ Hermes) 

great bUU, as it Was then, whenbutnewtoitfelfe. Byitlfayit 

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rouerned : howitwascoueredwith waters, andtgamerfopled: HoW 
Kings and Kingdomes haue fimjbei and fallen; and for what <ver- 
tueandpiety GOD made profperous , and for what wee and defo r- 
mitibemade wretched, botbthe one and the other. AnditisnottbeleaM. 
debtwhichweowerv»toHiftory,tbatitbathmadeVsacquai^ 
detd Anceftors ; and, out of the depth and darkenefe of the earth, deli- /oft 
ueredrvs their memory and fame. In a word, wee may gather oat of -) 
Hiflory a policy no tijfwlfejhan eternall ; by the comparifin and apph- V . 
cation of vfcr mens fore-pafd miferics , with our owne like errour sand 

ill defer uings, 

ButitisneitherofExmplesthemo(iliuelyinftruclim,northewords 

ofthewijeftmen.northeterroroffuturetorments.thathatbyetfowroughe 
inour blind andftupifiedmindes; astomake rvsremember, Thatthcmfi* j. 
mteeyeandwifdomeofGOD doth peircethrough all our ■pretencesj asto 
makers remember, TbaTibeiufticeof GOD doth require none other ac- 
cufer,than our owne confeiences ; which neither thefalfe beauty ofourappa. 
renta£tions,nor all thefor^JBi^ , whieh (topacifie the opinions of men ) 
weputon ; caninany , ortheleaft kind, couerfromhk knowledge. Andfo 
much did that Heathen wij 'dome corf efc, noway as yet qualified by the 
knowledge ofatrue GOD. Jfanyfaith Eurypides)haum2,m his life com- 7 
mittcd wickedncile, thinke he can hide it from the euerlafting gods, ) 
hethinkesnotwell. 

To repeat GODS tudgements inpanicuhr,"t>pon thofe of all degrees^ 

which baueplaiedwith his mercies f wouldrequire a yolume apart : for the 

Sea of examples hath no bottome. The markes , fetonpriuatemen , are 

with their bodies caft into theeatth; and their fortunes , written onely in 

the memories of thofe that liuedwith them : fo as they whdfucceed,and haue 

not feene the fall of other s>doe not f ear e their cwne faults. GODSiudg- . 

ments <vpon the greater and 'great eft , haue beene left to pofterityifirft^by 

tho]e happy hands which the Holy Ghofthathguided j andfecondly x bytheir 

.^ertUAiJ^oJmegatherjdtheaBs^jndsofrnen , mighty andremarke- 

able inthe world. Nowtopoyntfarreoff, andtofpeakeoftheconUerfion 

ofMgTllsim&iTicuillsJor Ambition : Or ofthegreateftandmoft glorious 

Kings , who hauegnawne thegrafe of the earth with beafts , for pride and 

ingratitude towards GOD: Or of that wife working of Pharao, when 

hejluethe Inf. ants oflirael, ere they had recouered their Cradles I Or of 

the policy o/Iezabcl,^ couering the Murder o/Naboth by a triall of the 

Elders, according to the Lap : With many thoufands of the like : what 

wereit other , than to make an hopelejfe proofed , that farre-off exam- 

pleswould not be left to tbefamefarr-offrejpefts, as heretofore ? For 

who hath Hot obferuedj what labour , prattife, periB, bloudfbed, and 

cruelty 






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cruelty, the Kings and Princes of the world haue undergone, exercijed, 
taken on them , and committed j to make them-felues and their iffues 
maifters of theworld\ Andyet hath Babylon, Perfia, Egypt, Syria, 
Macedon, Carthage, Rome, and the reft, no fruit , flower , grajfe, 
nor leafe, fpr',r ging~»pon the face of the Earth, of tbofef cedes : No ; their 
*vcry roots andruines doe hardly remaine. Omn ia qu c manu homi- ... <^. m '"-^ *"*H 
Hum fa<9afunt,vel mania hominumeuertuntur, velitando& duran- qJ-tf- ».A-*7f- ■**''> 
do deficiunt : All that the hand of man can make, is either ouer-^ '** 
rurndbythehandof man , or at length by {landing and continuing 
confumed. Thereafons of whoferuines , arediuerflygiumbythofetbat 
ground their opinions onfecsndcaufes. AH Kingdomes and States ham 
fallen (faythe Politicians) by outward and forraine force , orbyinward 
negligence arid dijjenfion, or by a third caufe arifing from both : Others ob~ 
feme, That the ^reate ft haue funck downs i;nder their owne weight ; of 
which Liuie hath a touch : eo creuit , vt magnitudine laboret fua .' 
Others , That the diuine prouidence (which Crarippus obiccledto Porrt- 
pey ) hath jet downe the date and period of euery eftate , before their fir ft 
foundation and erection. But hereof I will glue my fife a day out? to 
rejoltie. 

For feeing the fit ft boohs oftheflollowingftory , h %ue <vnd. rtaken the 
i difcourfe of the fir ft Kings and Kingdomes : and that it is impoftiblefor 
the (hart life of a Preface, to trauaile after and ouer-take farr-off Anti- 
quity, andtoiudge of it ; I will, for the prefent , examine what profit 
bath beene gathered by our oxone Kings , and their Neighbour Princes : 
• who hauing beheld, both in diuine and human; letters , the fucceffe of in- 
fidelities , iniitfticeJ, and cruelties j haue ( notwithjlanding) planted af- 
ter the fame patterned. 

True it is that the judgements of all men are not agreeable ; nor ( which 
is more ftrangt ) the affeclion of any one man ftirred rypp a-FiKewtth ex- 
amples of like nature : But euery one is touched mo ft, with that which 
moft neerelyfeemtthto touch his owne priuati^ ; Or otherwife bell futeth 
i With his apprehenfion. But the judgements of GOD are foreuer un- 
changeable; neither is he wearied by the long proceffe of time-,, and won 
to giue his blefting in one age , to that which he hath curjed in another, 
lfhereforethofe that are wife.*, or who lew if dome ^ if it be not great, yet 
is trueandweH grounded ; will bee able to difcerne the b itter fruites ofir^ ^v 
religious policig-,, as well among thofe examples that are found in ages re- > 
tnouedfarre from the prefent, as intbofe of latter times. Andthatitmay 
no leffe appear e by euident proof c , than by affeueration , That ill doing ~k 
hath alwaies beene attended with iUfucceffe; I Will here, by way of pre- 
face , r untie ousr Jome examples , which the worke enfuing hath not 
reached. 

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Among our Kings oft be N orma n racily we haue nofoonerpafed ouer 
the violence of the bloimmConquefl , than-we encounter with afingular 
and moft remarkeable example of Gods iufticc, rvpon the children of 
Henry thefirft. For that King,-when bothby force, craft, and cruelties, 
bee had difpofiefl , ouer-reacht , andlaftly made blind and deflroyedhis elder 
Brother Robert D«^o/Normandy , to make his oyonejonnes Lords of 
this Land ; GOD caft them all, Male and Female,Nephe-wes andNeeces 
(Maud excepted) into the bottome of the Sea, "with a boue a hundred and 
fiftie others that attended them j -whereof "a great many -were Noble , and of 
the King dearely beloued. 

Topafe ouer the rett, till 'we come to Edward the Second: it is certain, 
that after the Murder oft hat King , the ifiue ofbloudthen made, though it 
had fame times of flay andftopping,didagaine breake out$ and that Jo often, 
andinjuch aboundanct^ , as all our Princes of the Mafculinerace (very few 
excepted) died of the fame difeaft*. And although the young year es of 
E d ward t he 1 bird , made his knowledge of that horrible fact no more then 
fujpitious : yet in that bee afterwards caufedhis o-wne Vnclethe Earleof 
Kent to die-j , for no other offence than the defire of his Brothers redempti- 
on, -whome the Earle as then fuppofed to bee lilting; (the King making 
that to be treajon in bis Vncle^, -which "Was indeed treafon in him-Jelfe, had 
his Vncles intelligence beenetrue)tbis Ifaymadeitmanifefl., that hee was 
not ignorant of what hadpafl, nor greatly defrous to haue had it otberwife; 
though he caufd Mo rtimer to die for the fame. 

This cruelty thefecret and vnfearchable judgement of GOD reuen- ■ 
ged,on theGrand-cbild of 'Edward the Third : andfo itfellout y 'euen toihe 
lafl of that Line , that in the fecond or third dejcent they -were all buried 
<vnder the mines of thofe buildings , of -which the Mortar hadbeene tempe- 
red-with innocent bloud. For Richard the fecond, who fa~W, both his 
Treafurers , bisChanccl[or,andhis Steward* -with diuers others of his 
Counfailours,fomeofthemflaughteredby the people, others in his abfence 
executed by his enemies iyet bee alwaies tooke him-felfefor ouer yife, to bee 
taugte-by examples. The Earles of Huntington and Kent , Montague 
and Spencer, -who thought themfelues di s great poiitjtians in thofe dales, 
as others haue done in thefe : hoping topleafethe King, aadtofecure them- 
felues, by the Murder of Gloucefter; died foone after, with many other 
their adherents , by the Be violent hands; and fane morejhamefuttythen 
did that Duk^. And as for the King bimfelfe ( who in regard of 
many deedes , rvtrwnby of his Greatnefe^ , cannot bee execufed, 
as the difauo-wing him-felft by breach of Faith , Charters , Pardons , and 
Patents) He-was inthe Prime of his youth depofed ; and murdered by 
tbefotth Semane 4nd ^ ament y° fLanca&e ^ a ^^rdsHcnty 

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1 /;«■ £*»£, *&>/« 77:/<r »w wA, <?»i &# obtaining the Crdwie trot* 
towns: vho brake Faith with the Lordes athis landing, protettivgto in. 
tend only the recouerie of his proper Inheritance ; brake faith with Richard 
himfelfe ;and brake Faith vithall the Kingdomein Parliament, to whom 
mfwore tbatthe depofed King jhould Hue . After that he had enioyedthis 
Bealmefomefeytyeares, and in that time had beenefet <~jponon all fides 
byhisSubiec~ls,andneuerfreefromconfpiracies andrebellions : he (aw (if 
Souks immortal! fee and difcerne any thinges after the bodies death) his 
Grand-childe Henrie the fixe, and his Sonne the Prince, fuddenly, and with- 
out mercy, murdered ;the pofefionofthe Crowne (for which hehadcaufed 
fimuch blood to bee powred out) transferred 'from his race-, and by the If- 
fues of his Enemies yporne and enioyed: Emmies, whom by his ovnepra- 
tfife hecfuppofed, that he had left no leffe poverleffe, than the fuccef 
fionofthe-,Kingdomec l uemonleJJe i by entailing the fame rppon his o»ne 
■ I fues by Parliament. And out. of doubt \ humane reafon could haue 
tudgcd no other-wife, but that thefe cautious prouifions of the Father, fe- 
tonded by the Valour andfgnaH Tories of hisSonneHemy thefift* 
bad buried the hopes ofeuery Competitor, lender the defpaireofalreconquefi 
and recouery. I fay, th » humane reafon might fio haue. fudged : were not this 
pafige of Cahubon alfotrue-, Dies, hora, momentum,euertendis do- 
minationibus fufficit , qua: adamantinis credebanrur radicibus effe 
fundata'; A day, an houre* a moment, is enough to ouermrne the 
things, that fccraed to haue beene founded and rooted in Adamant. 

How for\\cm\z the fixt,rvpon7chom the great ftorme of his Grand- 
fathers greeuous faults fell, as it formerly had done rvp on Richard tbc* 

Grandchilde of Edward : although he was genera^ eSleemed forages 
tie andinnocent Prirtce iy et as herefufedthe daughter of 'Armaignaco/ffe 
houfeofNauane,thegreateftoftbe Princes of France, tovbombee^ 
■Was of lanced (by which match hee might haue defended his Inheritance iff 
France)**/ married the Daughter of Anion, (by which heloU all that hee 
hadmYianct) fo as in condijcending to the unworthy death of his Fnckle 
ofGlcceder, the maine and ftrong pillar of 'the houfe of "Lancaster; Hee 
drew on himfelfe And this kingdome thegreatefl ioynt-loffe & dijhonor ;thae 
euerttfuftainedfincethe Norman Conqueft. Of itbomit may truly be f aid, 
^bichaCounfellorofhiso^nefpakeofHtmktheThirdofFrance,Q\iii 
eftoit vn for t gentil- Prince ; mais fon reigne eft adueriu en vne fort ' 
mauuois temps, That he was a very gentle Prince } but his reign hap. 
pened in a very vnfortunate feafon. ' 

It U true, that Buckingham and Suffolke vert the praElifers and con- 
triucrs of the Dukes death: Buckingham*** Suffolke, becaufetheDuke 
gaue inftruEiions to their authority, which otherwife ynder the Queen had bin 
abfohte S the Greene, in refpett of her perfomll vnmdfttet^pc injuria 

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forms', fow«/f Gloucefter diffwaded her marriage 
anfwerabletothefeed } thefuccejJetotheCounfaile. For after the cutting 
dovneof Gioace&cr, Yotke grew ypfifaft , as hee dared to dilute his 
right, both by arguments andarmes ; z'» wWflb j««r«//, Surfolke «n/ Buck- 
ingham,^ thegreateft number of their adherents, weredi^olued. And 
although for his breach of Oath by Sacrament, itpleafedGodtoftrikedown 
Yorke : yethisfonnethe Earle of March, following the plalne path which 
his Father hadtroden out, defpoyledHemy the Father, andhdwatd,the 
fm&> both of their Hues and Kingdomes. Andwhat Was the end now of 
that politique Lady the Queene, other then this, That [hee liuedto behold 
the vretched ends of all her partakers: that jleliued to looke on, while her 
HusbandtheKing, and keronelyfonne the Prince, were hewen in funder-, 
while the Crowne Wasfet on his head that did it^. S hee liuedto fee her 
felfe dejpoilcd of her EUatc^, and of her moueables : andlaUly, her 
Father , by rendnng <vp to the Crowne o/France the Earledom't-, of 
Prouence and other places, for the payment of Fifty tboufand croWnes 
for her ranfome , to become a flarke beggar. Andthis was the end of that 
sim:c.i 9 . fubtiltie^, wbicbSivati&cscaUetb&nc r bupvnri$itcous:forotherfruie d 3 -) 
hathit neuer yeeld ejdjnc£tbewrldwas. 

~~Andnow came tffo Edward the fourthstume (though after many dif- 
t\ ficulties)to triumph. For aUthe Plants of Lancafter were rooted n>pp-, 
One onely Earle of 'Richmond' excepted : whome afo hee had once bought 
of the Duke of Britaim , but could not hold him. And yet was not this 
of 'Edward fuch aplantation , as could any waypromife it felfe (lability. 
For this Edward fta King ( to omit more than many of his other cruel- 
ties) beheld and alloWedtbeflaughter, which Gloucefter, Dorfer, Has- 
tings , and others , made of Edward tht Prince in his owne prefence : of 
which tragicaHAclors , there was not one that ef coped the iudgement of \ 
GOD in the fame kinde. And He, which ( befides the execution of his 
brother of Clarence , for none other offence then hee him-felfe had 
formed in his owne imagination ) infirucled Gloucefter to kill Henry 
thefixt, his predecejfour ; taught him alfo by the fame Art to kill his owne 
fonnes andSuccefors Edward WRichard. For thofe Kings, which > 
haue fold the blond of others at a low rate ; haue but made the y 
Market for their owne enemies, to buy of theirs at the fame price*/ 
To Edward the fourth fucceeded Richard the Third, thegreatefl 
Maifterin mifcheife of all that fore-went him : who although, for the 
neceftity of hisTragedie^, hee had more parts to play, and more to per- 
forms in hk owrie~ferfon, then all the reft ; yet hee fo well fitted euery 
affeftion thatplayd with him, as if each of them had but atledhis owne 
intereft. F or he wrought fo cunningly rvpon theaffecliens of Haftings, 
^Buckingham, enemies to the 6)uecne and to all her kindred : as hee 

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eafilyaUuredthemtocondifcendythatKiuehandGtey , the Kings IsUter- 
nJl f ncle andhalfe brother ■ ) fbould(fortbefirfi ) bee feueredffom htm : fe- 
condly v hee -wrought their confent to banc ■them imprifoned, andlaslly(for 
the a-voydmg of 'future inconuenience ) to baue their heads feuered from 
their bodies, Andhau'mg now brought thofe bis chief e inflruments to ex- 
ercifethat common precept-,, -which the Deufllbatb -written oneuerypofl, ^"J^J 
namely ,To depreffe thofe whome they hadgrieued,andto deftroy thofe -whom Sca : de c ' cm - 
they had depreft j Hee rvrgedtbm argument fo farre and fo forcibly - ? as no- 
thing but the death oftheyongiing himfelfe,andofbis brother \cpuldfafbion 
tire (onclufion. For bee caujeditto be hammered into Buckingham s bead, 
T'kit , wfotifqeuer the king,or bis brotber,fhouldhaus ab'e yeares toexercife 
their power; tbey.wouldtakeamoft feuerereuenge of that cureleffewrmg t 
oJerr4totbeir<zwcledndbrotber,\ki\icrsattdGrcy. 

-But this -was not his manner ofreafoning -with Hauings/a^o/e fidelity 
to his Maifien formes -Was without fufpeft ; ; and yet the Di uell, w h o neuer 
dif]w\tdes by impdf ability , taught him to try him. And jo bee did. But -when 
heefoundby Garesby ,who founded himjtbat hewasnotfordable; Hefirfi 
n-foltiid to kill him fitting in,counce[l: t wherein hamngfayled with his, 
jwc^d; Befetthe fiangmdhrvpon him with weapon of more weight. And 
hxauje nothing eije could mdue his appe tite-i He caufed bis head to be ftrick- 
en off, bfort he eate his dinner. A greater iudgement ofG D , than this 
<-vpon Hallings, J baue neuer phferued in anyftoric^,. F or the j elf e fame 
d.ae that the Earle Riucrs , Grey , andotbers , Were ( without triad of 
Lm-, or offence giUen). by 'Haftings advice executed at Pomfret : J 
jay Baitings hinhfelfe intbefamedaie^, and (as I take it) in the fame 
hourly in the fame law lefje manner bad his headflricken off in the 
TowerofLondox), But Buckingham lined a while longer; andwith art 
eloquent orationperfwadedtbe Londoners to eleft Richard/or their king. 
AndhauingrecewedtheEarldomeqfirieTQiordforrew.ird)bejides the high 
hope if marrying his daughter to the Kings onelyfonne-, after many grie- 
t*ousyexations of minde^andrvnf ortunate attempts fieingitixhe end betray- 
ed and deliuered rvp by bis truflieflferuant ; He had his headfeueredfrom 
bh bpdy-a i Salis bury, withoutthetroubleofanyofhisPeeres. And what 
fuccep had R ich ard bimfelfe after all thefe mifchefes andMurders-policies^ 
0»dcounter-policiestoChriflianreligion:andafterfuchtime,aswitham<}fi 
mercileffe hand bee bad prefed out the breath of his Nephews andNaturaR 
Lords j other than tbeprpjpjrityoffofbort a ljfe,as it tooke end , ere him- 
■J c fc could weO looke ouer anddifcerne it\ the great outer ie ofintiocenibloudy 
obtaining at GODS hands the effufion of his ; who became afpeclacle 
offbame anddifbonpr-Jbotb tO-his friends andenemeis. 

TmcrueUKing^enry tbefeauenthcut off;andwas thereitfyo doubt) 
the immdiate inftrumentqfGODS iuflice. Apoliticke Prince bee Was 

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ifeuer there were any , and who by the ingine of his wifdome, beat downe and 
ouertumed as many ftrongoppofitions both before and after hee -ware the 
crowne as etter King of England did :I fay by his wifdome, becaufe as he euer 
left tberaines ofhkaffeOions in the hands of his profit ,fohe^<nes way- 
edhis~rvnliertalwglbyhisaHttitiesJ^^ 

muchas cannot bedeniedit wall humane atlions. Bee had well obferued 
the proceedings of Loy s the eleuentb , whome beefoRowedin all that "Was 
roy all or royal-like ;but hee wasfarrmore iufl,and begun not their procejfes 
whome hee hated or feared by the execution, as Loy s did. 

Hee could neuer indureany mediation in rewarding his feruants , and 
therein exceeding -wife-, for what fi euer him-felfegaue, bee^m-felferecei- 
ued backe the thanks and the tyue , knowing it well that the affections of men 
{purchafe^mahingj&reddely as by benefits ) were traynesWat better^ 
came great Kings , than gr eat fubie&s. Onthe contrary, inwhatfo-euerhec 
greened his fubieBs^he wifely put it off on tbofejbxt he found fit miniftersfor 
j'uch aftions. How-fo- euer-, the taking off, of Sranles head , whofet the 
Crowne on his, and the death of the young Earle of Warwick , fonne to 
GeorgcD. o/Clarencc/^w, asthefuccefealfo did, that he held fome- 
what of the errors of his Anceflers , for hiipoffefion in the firfi line ended 
in his- grand children , as that of Edward the third and Henry the fourth 
bad done. 

Now for KingHenry the eight ■: if allthepitlures^ndPatternesof a 
mercileffe P rjnce^oeYe loft in the World , they might all againe be painted to 
ifrelife^, out of theflory of this King. For how many feruants did bee ad~ 
uance in haft (but for what Dertue no man could fufpetl) and with the change 
of his fancy ruined Againe; no man knowing for what offence? To how ma- 
ny others of more dejertgaue heeaboundantfiowres from whence to gather 
bony, and in the end of Haruefi burnt them in the Hiue ? How many wines 
did hie cut off, and caft off , as his fancy and affettion changed \ How many 
Princes ofjhe bloud ( whereof fome of them for age could hardly crawle to- 
wards tbeblock) withaworldof others'of all degrees ( of whome our com- 
mon Chronicles baue kept the accompt)didhe execute? Yeajn his Dery death* 
bed , and when he w as at the point to hauegiuen his accompt to GO D for 
the aboundance of bloud already fpilt: He imprifoned the Duke p/Norfolke 
the Father ',andexecutedthe EarleofSuney thefonne;the one,whofe defer- 
nings he knew not how to<value, hauingneuerwn^dj^thingthatcon- 
cernedjiiiownehonour, andphe Kings feruices the other, neuer hauing com- 
mitted any thing -worthy ofhisleafl difpleafure : the one exceeding Valiant 
andaduifed ; theother,no lefie ^valiant than learned ,' and of excellent hope. 
But befides the fmrowes which hee heaped rvpontheFatberlefie, andwid- 
dowesat home^ • and befides the <vaineenterprifes abroade, wherein it 
fs thought that bee confumed more Treafure, than all our nnftorioiis 

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Kings did in their feuer all Conquefls : what caufelefe andcruell warm did 
^he make >vpon his owne Nephew K in g lames thefift\ What Laves and 
Wills did he deuije , to eftablifij this Kingdome in his oWne ijjues \ <vfin<r his 
(barpeft weapons to cut off, and cut downe thofe br anches, which fiprang from 
the fame roote that him-jelfe did. And in the end ( notwithftanding thefe 
his Jo many irreligious prouifons) itjleafed G D to takeaway all his 
r owne, without increafie ■ thought/or themfelues in their feuer all kindes , al 
Princes of eminent avenue . For thefe wordes of Samuels AgagJcSg' 
of the Amalekites, ham beene -verified rvpon many others : As th y fword 
liarh made other women childletfe: fo mall thy mother be childlelTe 
among other women. And that blond, whichthefame King Henry af- 
* firmed, that the cold aire o/Scotland had frozen ip in the North , GOD 
hath diffufed by the funfhine of his grace : from whence His Maiefty now 
liuing,andlongtoliue,is defended. Ofiwhome I mayfayittruely, That 
if all the malice of the world were infufedinto one «'e_> : yet could it not dif- 
cernein His life,euen to this daie^, any one ofthofefoulejpjts, by which the 
Confidences of all the forenamed Princes { tn effect ) haue beene defiled ; nor 
any d'-oppe of that innocent Moud on the fword of his iufiice, withwhichthe 
mofi that fore- went him , haueflayned both their hands andfamcL, . And 
for this Crowne of £ ngland ; it may truely be a mowed , That he hath re- Viy ^>AA ■ 
ceiuedit euenfrom the hand of GOD, and hath fiayedthe time of putting ^ } '$ f> <- ' 
it on, howfoeuer he wereprouo led to haften it^ : J hat Hee neuer tooke re- 
venge of any man , that fought to put him befide it, : That Hee refufedtbe 
afiUance of Her enemies , that wore it long , with as great glory as euer 
Prince ffe did, That His Maiefty entrednot by a breach, nor by bloud ; but 
by the Ordinary gate, which his ow>ne right jet open*, and into which, by a 
generall hue and Obedience , Hee Was receiued. And howfoeuer His 
Maiefties preceding title to this Kingdoms, Was preferred by many 
Princes ( witneffe the Treaty at Cambtay in theyeare, u 5 c, ) yet hee 
neuer pleafed to difputeit^, during the life of 'that renownedLady , his 
Pradeceffor ; no, notwithftanding theiniury of not being declared Heire, 
in all the time of Her longr eigne. 

Neither ought wee to forget, , or neglecl our thankefulnefie to GOD i ^C<^ • 
for the '-uniting of the Northerne parts of Brittany to the South , to wit 
qfScotlandto England, which though they were feuered but by fimall brookes 
and bancksjet by reafon of the long continewedwarre, and the cruelties ex- 
T era fed ypon each other, inthe affection of the Nations , they were infinitly 
feuered. This IfayisnottbeleaflofGodsblefiingsw'hlcb HisMaiefty 
bath brought with him mnto this Land : No, put all our petty greeuances 
together, and heap them Dp to their hight,they wil appear e but as a Mole-hil y 
compared with the Mount aine of this concord. And if all the Hijioriens fines 

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....'; owledgedthe --vniting of the Red-Eofe, tmdi be Wt 
..;,; happineffe, (Cbr&ian Religion excepted) that euer ibis K 
me reamed from GOD, certainelythe peace betweenetbetto > Lio 
of gold and gules >and the making them one, doth by many degrees exceed the 
former ; for by it, befides the (paring of our britifb bloud, heretofore anddu - 
ring the difference Jo often & aboundantly{hed,theflate of England is more 
' ajfured, the Kingdom more inabled to recouer her auntient honor an d rights, 
and by it made more inuincible, than by all our former alliances, praclices, po- 
licies andconquefls: It is true that hereof ^yre do not yetfinde the e§ ? eft. But 
had the Duke of Parma in theyeare 1588, ioyned the army -which bee com- 
manded } ~withtbat of Spaine, and landed it on the fouth coafl ; andkadhis 
Maiefly at the fame time declaredhimfelfe again ft <vs in the north : it is e ri- 
fe to diuine -what had become cfthe liberty of England, certainely me -would 
then without murmur haue bougbp this <vnion at a farre greater prife than it 
bath f nee cofl <vs . 

It is true, that there -Was neuer any Common-Weale orKingdome in the^ 

"World , whereinnoman had caufe to laments. K ings Hue in the -world and 

not aboite itL, . They are not infinite to examine euery mans caufe , ortore- 

leiue euery mms -wants . Andy et, in the latter, ( though to his o-wnepreiu- 

i' . dice ) His Maiefly hath had more compafion of other mens necefiuies, than 

■ ■ ' of his owne Coffers. Of '-wbme it may be {aid, as of Salomon,' Dcdic Dens 

pinemmmt Salomoni latitudinem Cordis : Which if other men doe not <-vnderfland 

msti.uK-4. with Pineda, to be meant /y> Liberality , butby Latitude of knowledge; 

yet may it bee better fpoken of His Maiefly, than of any King that euer 

England had; -who as -well in Diuine, as Humane nmderftanding, hath 

exceeded all that fore-ycent him, by many degrees. 

I could fay much more of theKings Maiefly, without flatteries : didl 
not fe are the imputation of prefumption , and-withallfujpecl , that it might 
befall thefe papers of mine , ( though the loffe -were little ) as it did the Pic- 
tures of Queene Elizabeth , made by 'vnskilfull and common Painters j 
"Which by her owne Commandement , -Were knockt inpeecs and cafl into the 
fire. For ill Artifts ,infetting out the beauty of the externally and-weake 
"Writers , in defcribing the "venues of the internal! ; doe often leaue topofte- 
rity, of -well-formed faces a deformed memory ; and of the mo ft. per feEl and 
Princely mindes, a mo ft defettiuereprtfentation. It mayfuffice, and there 
needesno other difcourfe ; if the hone ft Reader bu t compare the crueU an d 
turbulentpa^ages of our former Kings, and of other their Neighbour-Prin- V 
ces (qfypbomeJofWatpurpofe I bane inferted this breife difcourfe) -with 
BhMakftks temperate, reyengelejfe, and iiberalldifpofltion : I fay, th.-it 
if the bone ft Reader -weigh them iuftly , and -with an euen hand : and-witbatl, 
butbeftoweuery deformed child on his true Parent , Ee(ha11find,thatthere 
is no man which hathfo iufl caufe to complaine, as the King him f elf e hath. 

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Now as vps hauetoldihe fuccejfeofthe trumperies and cruelties of o.ir 
owne Kings, and other great perfonages : fowefinde , that GJLD iseuery 
where the fame GOD. And as it pleajedhimto punijhthe -vfurpatwn, 
and ronnaturaU cruelty o/Henry the fir fl , and of our third Edward , in 
their Children for many generations : fo dealt H e with thejonnes of Lays 
Debonaire, the feme of Charles the great, or Charkmain. For after 
Jttch time as Debonaire of France, had tome out the eies of Bernard his 
Nephew, the fonne 'o/Pepin , the eldeft forme (//Charlemain, andhdre of 
the Empire, and then caufedhimto dieinprifon , as did our Henry fo Ko- 
bert his elder brother : there followed nothing kit murders •-upon murders , 
poyfonings,imprifonmsnts, and ' ciuill wane ; tiO the wholerace of that fa- 
mous Emperour Was extinguified. 

And though Debonaire, after he had rid himfelfe of his Nephew by 
dnjiolent death ; and of his Baflard Brothers by a ciuill death (halting in- 
ch fed them with furegard. all the dales of their Hues ,within a Mon. iftcrizJ) 
held him felfe fecure from all oppofition : TetGOD raifed njp againib 
him {which bee fufpetlednotS) his owne • fonne s , to--vexebim, toinuade 
him, to take htmp-ifoner, andtodepoje him ; his owne fonnes, with 
. wbome ( tofatufie their ambition ) hee badfijaredhis eftate, andgiuen them 
Crownes to Weare^ , and Kingdomes togouerne^, during his owne lifc^. 
Tea bis eldefi fonne Lothaire(/or hee hadfourc, three by his firflwifc^, 
andonebyhisfecond; towitt, Lothaire, Pepin, Loys, and Charles) 
made it the caufefif his depoftion , That he had <-jf e d "violence towards 
his Brothers and Kinfmen- andthathehadfufferedhis Nephew ( whome 
bee might haue deliuered) to be flainc.,, eo quod, faith the Text, fratri- to ^«<« 
bus etpropinquis violentiam intulerit, et nepotem (uum , quern ipfe "' '"'''**'' 
liberarepoterat, interfici permiferit. Becaufehee vfed violence to 
his Brothers and Kinfmen, and fuffred his I\ ephew to be {lain whom 
hemight hauedeliuered. 

Yet did hee that which few Kings doe j namely, repent him of his cruel- 
tic^. For among many other things , which hee performed in the General! 
Afiemblie of the States, it foUowes, Poft hxc autem palam fe erralle con- 
fefius, & imitatus Imperatoris 1 heodofij exemplum, paenitentiam T , 
ipontaneam fufcepit, tarn de his, quam quaz in Bernardum proprium 
nepotem geflerat. After this hee did openly confeile him-felfe to 
haue erred, and following the example of the Emperour Theodofus 
nee vndet-went voluntary penance as, well for his other offences, 
* , as forthat which hee had done a^amO: Bernard his owne Nephew. 
-f*-7£7This hee did : andit Was praife-wortbic^. But the bloudrhat is 
vniuftly fpik , i$ notagaine gathered vp from the ground by repen- 
tance, Theic Medicines , miniftred to the dead j haue but dead 



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This Ring, as Ibmsfaid, bad four* Somes. To Lothaire his eldsfl he 

gauetbs Kingdom of Italy; as Cf#rlemain , bis Father , had done to 

Pepin tA* Father of Qernard,-wbowastofucceedhimintbe Empire. To 

V^mtbefecond forms bs gate the Kingdome of Aqamine : to Loys, the 

Kingdoms ofBauier : and to Charles, -whome bee bad by afecond-wife-, 

called ludirh,flbff remainder ofvbeKingdome of France. But this fecond 

■Wife, beingaUotber-inlwtotherefl,perfwaded D&onahctocaftbis 

JonneVeptnout o/Aquitaine; thereby to greaten Chafles; -which, after 

the death of bisfonne ?e^'m,heprofequutedto effett,again(t his Grandchild. 

bearing the fame name. In the meane -while, being inuaded by bisfonne Loys 

of Bauier, be dies for greife. 

Debonaire<fe^ : Loys o/Bauier^w^Charles after-wards caUedthe 
bald, andtheir Nephe-w Pepin of Aquitaine, ioyne in league againfl the 
Emperour Lothaire their eldefl Brother. They fight neare to Auxerre 
the mofl bloudy battaile that euer ■WjtsJtr.okenirL E?ance^» -which , the 
maruelous lojfe of Nobility, and men of -wane, gaue courage to the Sara- 
cens to inmdehalie -, to the Hunnes , to fall <vpon Almaine ; andthe 
Danes/o enter <vpon Normandy. Charles the Bald by treafon feizetb 
ypon his Nephew Pepin , kills him in a Cloy ikr 5 Carloman rebells againfl 
his Father- Charles the Bald , the Father burnes out the eies of bisfonne 
Carloman ; Bauire inuadesthe Emperour Lothaire/>& Br other, Lothzi- 
re quits the Empire , Hee is ajj "ailed and bounded to the heart by his o~Wne 
conjeience , for his rebellion again/} his Father and for, his other cruelties ■> 
and dies in a Monefiarie^. Charles the Bald theVncle oppreffeth his Ne- 
'phewes the formes of Lothaire j hee -vfurpeth the Empire to the preiudice of 
, Loys of Bauire his elder Brother , l&zuieis armies and bisfonne Carlo- 
\ man are beaten , hee dies of greife, andthe Vjurper Charles ispoyfonedby 
Zedechias a lew his Phifitian , bisfonne Loys le Beque dies of the fame 
drinke. Beque /.wiCharles the {\mpk,andfWo Baflards,LoysandCar- 
: lomanj^^y rebell againfl their Br other, but the eldefl breakes his Neck, the 
younger is flaine by a "Wild Bore ; thefonne 0/Bauiere had the f me iH defliny 
and brake his neck by a fall out of a Window infporting -with his companions. 
Charles t^grollc becomes Lord of all that thefonnes o/Debonaire held 
in Germanic, -where-with not contented, hee inuades Charles the fimple, 
butbeing forfaken of his Nobiltty , of his wife, andofhis<vnderflanding t 
bee dies a diflrafted begger. Charles the fimple is held in Ward(l)ip by 
JEudes Maior of 'the Pallace , then by Robert the Brother of YiudeSf and 
laflly being taken by the Earle of Vermandois , bee is forced to die in the 
prifon of PeromLoy s thefonne o/Charlcs the fimple breakes his Neckitg 
Cbafinga Wolfe, andof 'the two fonnes of this 'Loys, theonediesofpoyfon y 
the other dies inthe prifon of Orleans, after -whome Hugh Gapet,o/rf«o- 
tberrace^ndaftranger to the E rencb , makes him-felfa, King, 

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Tbefe miferable ends bad the ifues o/Debonaire: who after hee had 
once apparrellediniuftice with authority, his fonnes and 'fuccejj ours tookeajp 
thefajhion ; andwWe that Garment fo long "Without other prouifion,as when 
the fame Was tome from their /boulders, euery man defpifed them as mifera- 
ble and naked beggers. 1 he wretched fucceffe they had , (fath a learned 
French-man ) ftjewes , que en cefte mort il y avoir plus du fait des 
hommes que de Dieu,ou de la iuftice.that in the death ot that Pnnce, 
to wit of Bewardthe fonne of Pepin,the true heire oiCharlemaine,m&w 
had more medling,than either GOD, orlufticehad. 

But to come nearer homely it is certainethatv rancis the fir ft , One of 
the worthieft Kings {except for that faB ) that euer the French-men had, 
did neuer enioy himfelfe « after bee had commended the deftrutlion of the fr&f 
Proteftants of Mirandol^Cabrieres,fc>ffo Parliament of Prouence, 
Which poor e people-were there-rvpon burnt, andmurdered i men, woemen, 
andchildren. It is true-. , thatthefaid King Francis repented him felfe 
oftbefaSi, and gone charge to Henry hisfonnd, todoeiuftice<vpontbe 
Murderers ; threatning his fonne with GODS iudgments,ifheenegletled 
it.,. But this rvnfeafonable care of his , GOD Was notpleafedto accept 
for payments. For after Henry himfelfe was flaine infport by Mont- "N 
gumerie j we aR may remember wbatbecameofhisfourefonnes,Yrantis 
Charles,Henry ,and Hercules. Of which although three of them became J 
Kings', and were married to beautifuU and >vertuous Ladies : Yet were \ 
they, one after another, caft out of the world , without ftock or feed. Andy 
not-with-ftandingtheirjubtilty, and breach of faith; with all their Mafia- 
cres, rvpon thofe of the religion, and great effufion ofbloud; the Crowne Was 
fet onhishead,whomethey all laboured to diftolue ; the Protectants remains 
more in number than euer they were ; and hold to this day moreftrong citties 
than euer they had. 

Let 'vs now fee if GOD be not the fame GOD i»Spaine,<*?z'«Eng- 
land^waf France. Towards whome we willooke no further backe than to 
I)onPeiroofCaMe:inrefpec~tofwhichPrince,aRtheTyrantsofSkil, §^~ ^>*o/ 
our Richard the third, andthe great EuanVafilowicho/Mofcouia, 
were butpettie ones : this Caftihan , of all Cbriftian and Heathen Kings, 
baiting beene the moftmercilefe. For be fides thofe of his ownebToudTand 
Nobility which he e caufedtobeeflainein hisowne Court and Chamber, as 
SanchoRuis^^r^fAM^ro/Galatraua,RuisGonfales,Alphonlb 
Tello,tf»rf Don lohn o/Arragon , whome be cuttinpeeces and cafi into 
tbeftreets,denying him Cbriftian bur iaU : I fay befides thefe, and the flaughter 
flf Gomes Manriques , Diego Peres, Alphonfo Gomes , andthe great 
commander of CaMe; Hee made away the two Infants of Arragon his 
Cofen-germans,his brother Don Frederick,Don lohn de la Cerde, Al- 
buquerques,Nugnes de Guzman,Gorncl,€abrera,Tenorio,Mendes 

de Toledo, 



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de ToleJo, Guttiere bisgre.it Treafurer,andaUhis Kindred,anda "World 
ofot bers. Neither didhefpare his two youngefl brothers, innocent Prin- 
ces : -whome after bee bad kept in clofe prifonfrom tbeir Cradles , till one of 
them badliuedfixteeneyeares ,andtbe other, fouret:ent ; bee murdered them 
there. Nay bee fp.irednot his Mother , nor his "Wife the Lady Blanc h of 
Bourbon. Laflly as he caufedthe Archbif1)op ofToledo,andtbe Deane,to 
bee killed ofpurpofe to enioy their treafures : [o did he put to death M aho- 
«$». tf$?tiic met ^ben A lhamar King of Batbarie , -with fc men and thirty of his 
Nobilities ; that came mnto himforfuccour,"Withagreatfummeofmony, 
to leuy (byhisfauoui ) fome companies of fouldiers to remrne-withall. I Tea 
he -would needs afSiftthe Hangm.in-with bisoWite h md, in the execution of 
<f , *h the old King ; info much as Pope Vrban declared b<m anenernie both to 
GOD and Mm. But -what yeas his end ? Hauing beene formerly beaten 
Out of his Kin^dom^andre-eftahlifbedby the <va!our of the En^liih Na- 
tion Jed by the famous Duke of Lancaiter : He Teas (tabbed to death by his 
younger Brother the Parle of A ftramara , who di/pofefi all his Children of 
their inheritance i -which , but for the Fathers iniufiice and cruelty, bad ne- 
uerbecne in danger ofartyfucb thing. 

if-weecanparalkll any man -with this King, it mufi bee Dub lohn of 
Bur soigne: -who , after his traiterous murder of the Duke of Orleans, 
■caufedtheConfiab!eofArmz*nac,theChancelourof France, the Bifhops 
o/Coriftance,Bayeux, Eureux,ScnIis,Saintes, and other religions and 
reusrend Churchmen the Earleofzyzn Pre Heflor o/Chartres , and ( in 
effetl)aUthe Officers of iuflice., of the Chamber of 'Accompts, Treafurie^, 
andRequefl, (-with fixteene hundred others to accompany them)to beejud- 
denlyand<violentlyJ!aine. Hereby, {while bee hoped to gouerne, andtohane 
toteiMf mai ft red ^ nct : Eeeitasfooae after ftrucken-with an axe inthefacc^, 
hSJSIt inthe prefenceoftbe Dauphin ; and, -without any leifure to repent hit 
mifdeids.prefentlyfl.une. Thefe were the Layers of other mens mife- 
ties: and miferie found them our. 

No-w for the Kings o/Spaine, "Which liued both -with Hairy the fa 

J) &~ff^ ■ tenth, Henry the eighth, Queene Mary , ^Queene Elizabeth ; Fer- 

^^ d'nandoy ' Ana Z on -was the fir fl: and thefirfl that layd the foundation of 

tbeprefent Auftnan greatnefe. For this Kingdidnot content him-Mfe 

to hold Arra^on by the wfurpation of his Anceflor; and to fatten there- 

,, <vn tot h eK mgdomevfCzMcandUon, vbicb lfabel his vife held by 

I^gb^d, a ndhkafiflance y fr e mheromNeecetheDmghterofthelJi 

Hcmy:butmoft cruelly out craftily Without aB colour or pretence of rirbt 

^ealf^aflhiso^eNeeceoutoftheKingdomeof^Lrc, and, L-* 

znnadeiu. ^^^/^^^^^in^^Sc 

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Kings0fNaples,Prwces of 'hisownebloud,andby double alliance tied ■-unto 
him; fold them to the French : andwith the fame Army, fent for their juc- 
cour rvnder Gon faluo , cafl them out ; and fljared 'their Kindgome With the 
French , whome afterwards he moft [bamefuUy betrayed. 

ThiswifemdpoJitiqueKing,whofoldBeauenandhisowneBonour,to 
make bisfonne , the Prince o/Spaine , tbegreateft Monarch of the world : 
faw him die in the flower ofbisyeares ; and his wife neat with child, with 
her untimely birth, at once and together buried. Bis eldeft daughter married 
rvnto Don AlphonfoP/w^/Portugail, beheld 'her fir ft husband breake 
his neck in btrprefence; and being with child by herfecond,diedwitb iiL,. A 
iujliudgementof GOD ntponiberace of 'Ioh'n, father to AlphonTo, now 
Wholly extinguifoed -. w bo bad not onely leftmany difcorfolate Motbersin 
Porrugall , by the /laughter of their children), but bad formerly flaine, with 
his owne hand , thejonne and onely comforte of his Aunt the Lady Beatrix, 
Ducbeffe ofWiCeo . The fecond Daughter of 'Ferdinand, married to the 
Arch-Duke Philip, turned foole.; and died mad and deprived. Bii third 
daughter, beftowed on King Henry the 'eight, Bee faw caftojFby the King; 
the mother of many troubles in England i and the mother of a Daughter] 
that in her --vnhappy ^eafo fbed a world of innocent bloud ; loft Caliice to 
the i rench ; - and died heart-broken without increafe. To conclude : aS 
tbofe Kino domes o/Ferdinand haus maifters of anew name; and, by a 

flrangefmihe reg 'v,errM cndpo'feft . 

Gbaxkstbe0, fo;:n:tothe Arch-duke Philip, in wbofe -paine enter- 

prifesrvpontk French , <?$wthe. Almzm, and other Princes and States, 

Jo many multitudes of Chrifhanjouldiers , andrenownedCaptaines, were 

consumed : wbb gaue tbewUle a moft perilous entrance to the Turkes , and 

JuiferedKlwdesjbe Key 0) '■ Chriftendom^, to bee taken , wasmconclu- 

foncbacei out of 'France, andinafort out of 'Germany ; and left to the 

French, Metz, Touie, and\ 'erdun , places belongmgto the Empire ; 

fiole a-vayfrom Infpurg 5 andfcaledthe Alpes by torch-lhht , purfusdby 

Duks Maurice ,• hatting hoped to fw allow Dp all tbofe dominions , wherein 

bee concofted nothing fans his owns dif graces. And bailing, after the * • • 

flaughter offo many Millions of men , no one foots of ground in either : <L"% f^f 9 ?}•#■? 

Bee crept into a Cloyfter, and made himfelfea Penfoner of an hundred L hef m 

thoufand Duckets by theyeareto bisfonne Philip ; j9w« whom be yeryfow- 1 ^'''-' 1 ^ ' 

ly receiuedbis meane and ordinary maintenance. 

Bis Sonne againe King Philip tbefecond,notfatiffedto hold Holland "±Jl&f fl ^"^j 

a»d Zeland (wresledby his Anceslorsfrom Iaquelinefi&wr lawfull Prin- 

cejfe ) and to pojfeffe in peace manie other Prouinces of the Nether- 
lands : perfwaded by tbatmifchekous Cardinall of Granuile/*^ 

other Romilh Tyrants ; not onely forgot the moft remarkable ferui- 

eesy done to bis Father the Emperor by the Nobility of tbofe countries; not 

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onely forgot the prefent , made him rpponbis entrie, of forty millions of 
Florens,calledthe Nouale aide ; nor onely forgot, that hee had twice mofb 

fohmnly fwometotbe General! (lates , to maintaine and preferue their aun- 
cient rights, priuiledges, andcuftomes, -which they had 'enioyed render their 
thirty and fine Earles before* him, Conditional Princes ofthofe Prouin- 
ces : but beginningfirll to conftraine them,and enthrall them by the Spaniln 
Inquifmon , and then to impouerijh them by many new deuijed and intole- 
rable Impoftions ; He laflly, by firong hand and maine force, attempted to 

make him-felfenot onely an abfolute Monarch ouer them, likeamto the 
Kings and Soueraignes ^/England ^W France; but Turke-like, to tread 

i <vnder bisfeete all their National and fundamental! Lawes -priuiledges, and 

) ancient Rights. To eff eel -which, after he had eafily obtained from the Pope 
"uj I a difpenfation of his former Oathes"\ "Which dijpenjation was the true ' 
caufe of all the -wane andbloudfhedfihce then ) and after he had tried~what 
hee could performe, by diuiding of their owne Nobility , <vnder the gouern- 
ment of his bafeffier Margaret o/Auftria , and the Cardinall Granuile; 
Hee employed that mofl mercilejje Spaniard Don Ferdinand Aluarez of 
Toledo Duke ofAlua,followed-with a powerful! army offtrange Nations: 
bywbom hefirftflaughteredtbatrenownedCaptainethe EarleofEgcnont, 
Prince o/Gauare ; and Philip Montmorency Earle of Horn : made 
away Montigue, andthe Marquis o/Bergues; and cut off in thofe fixe 
. yeares(thatAluagouerned) of Gentlemen and others , eighteenethouf and 
>^- and fixe hundred , by the hands of the Hangman , befides all his other barba- 
rous murders and maff acres. By -wbofe miniftery -when he could not yet 
bring his affaires to their "Wifhed endes , hatting it in his hope to -worke that 
byfubtlety, -which he had failed to perfourme by force : Heefentfor gouer- 
nour his bafiard brother Don lohn o/Auftria ; a Prince of great hope, and 
rvery gracious to thofepeople.. But bee, rvfingthe fame papall aduantage 
that his predeceffors had done: madenofcrupleto take Oatb<-vpontheHoly 
EuangeliUs, to obferue the treaty made "with the general! fiates ; and to 
difcbargetheLow Countries of ' aUSpania.rds,andoth'er flrangers, there- 
in garr fond. Towards "whofe Pay andPafport , the Netherlands ftrai- 
ned them- f elites to mike payment of fixe hundredthoufandpoimds. Which 
monies receiued , Hefuddenly furprifedtheCitadells of Antwerp and Nev 
meures : not doubting (being rvnfufpefted by the States) io hauepofjelb 
him-felfe of all the mai firing places of thofe Prouinces. For "whatfoeuer 
beeouertlypretended-.Hetbeldinfecret a contrary counceU -with the ■ Secre- 
tary Efcouedo , Rhodus, Barlemont, and other s, Miniflers of the 
Spanifh tyranny . formerly praclifed, and now againe intended. But 
let rvs no-wfee the effect and end of this periwig , and of all other the 
, Dukes cruelties. Fir ft fir him-felfe; after hee had murderedfo many of 
the Nobilities; executed (as aforefaidyigbteene thufand fixe hundred . 

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infixeyeores ; and mofl cruelly flaine M.anJVoman,andCbilde, m Mecklin, 
c Zurphen, Naetden, and other places : a ndafter hee had con fumed /ixa 
andthirtiemillionsoftrcafureinfixeyeares:notwithUlndinghis'Spanif} 
rvant , That hee Wouldfuffecate the Hoi Ian ders in their owne butter- bar- 
rels, andmilke-tubbs : Hee departed the country no other-wife accompani- 
edjban Tvith the curfe and deteflaiignofthe whole Nation ; leaning his mai- 
fters affaires inatenfoldworfeejlatc , than bee found them at bis firftarri- 
uaU. .FwDonlohn, whofe haughty conceipt of 'him felfe ouer-camethe 
greatest difficulties ; though his judgem ent -were oiier-wca he to mannage the 
leaft : what wonders did his fearefull breach of faith bring fort h-, other 
than the King his brothers iealoufie and diflrufl ; with the runtime !y death 
that fei^ed him , euen in the flowre of his youth . Jndforcfcoucdohis 
(harpe- witted Secretaries , who in his owne imagination had conquered fir 
his Maifler both England and the Netherlands ; being fent into Spaine 
<vponfomenevproiecl,Hewas atthefirfi arriuall, and before any accejfeto 
the King, bycertaine Ruffians appointed by Anthony Peres (though by 
better -warrant than his ) rudely murdered in his owne lodging. Lafily , if 
Wee confider the King of Staines carriage , his counfaile, andfucceffein 
this bufinejfe ; there is nothing left to the memorie of man more remarkeable. 
For hee hath paid aboue an hundred 'Millions , and the Hues of aboue fours 
bundredthoufandChrittians, for the lojfe of alltbpfe countries; which, for 
beauty , gout flacetonone ; and for reuenue, didequaUhis Weft Indies: 
for the lojfe of a Nation, which tnofl willingly obeyed him ; andwhoatthis 
day, after forty y ear eswarre, are in defpight of all his forces become free E- 
ftates,andfarremorerichandpewerfull, thantheywere, when hee firSi be- 
gan to impouerifb andopprefe them . 

Oh by what plots, by whatforfwearings, betray ings, opprefions, impri- 
fonmentsfortures^oyfonings^ndrvnderwhatreafons of State, andpoli^ 
^i»efubtelti^hauethefeforenamedKings,bothftrangers,andof 'our owne 
Nation^pUedthervengeameofGODrvponthem-felues^rvpontheirs^nd 
rvpontheirprudentminifters ! andin the end haue brought thofethingsto 
pajfefor their enemies , andfeene aneffea fojireftly contrarie to aOtheir 
owne counfailes and cruelties j as the o ne could neucrlme hoped for them- 
fkes ; and the otherneuer haue fucceedjd; if nofuch oppofition hadeuer 
beene made. GOD hathfaid it andperformed it euer : Perdam fapi- } °J) ' 
entiam fapientum, I willdcftrqy the wifdome of the wife^ 

But what of all this ? and to what end doe we lay before thTeies of the li- 
mngjhef aland fortunes of the dead feeing the world is the fame that it hath 
bmandthecbildrenofthcprefenttime,wilftilobeytbetrparents\ltismthe 
prefenttime, that all the wits ofthe world are exercifed. To hold the times 
Wehaue^e hold aU things lawfull:and either we hope to hold them for euer- } 
or at kaft we bopz* , that there is nothing after them to bee hoped for. 

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For as Wee are content to forget our owne experience , and to counterfeit 
the ignorance of our owne knowledge , in all things that concern? our flues ; 
or prejwade our fellies , that GOD hathgiuen <vs letters patents to purfue 
all our irreligious affections , with a non oWrante : fo wee neither looke 
behind <-vs what hath beene, nor before <vs whit (lull bed. It is true, that 
the quantitie which wee have , is of the body : wee are by it ioynedto the 
earth : weare compounded of earth j andwee inbabitit^,. The Heauens 
are high, fan off and<vnjearcheable: wee hauefenfe and "feeling of corporal 
things; and ofeternall grace ,but by reuelation. No meruaile then that our 
thoughts are alfo eartblie-, : and it is lefie to bee wondredat^ , that the 
words ofworthlefie men cannot cleanfe them ) feeing their doctrine and in- 
(irutlion, whofe nwderftanding the Holy Gbott <vouchfafedto inhabite, 
haue not performed it.,. For as the Prophet Efai cryedout long agone, 
Lord, who hath beleeued our reports? And out of doubt, ascfaicom- 
plaine d then for him f elf e and others : fo are they lejfe beleeued , euery day 
after other. For although Religion , and the truth thereof, bee in euery 
mans mouth, yea in the di(courje~of euery woman,whofor thegreatefl num- 
niitetttnus berarebut Idollsofvanitie.- what is it other than an rvniuer fall difiimu- 
tb.i.v t ,ia, i atl0n ? Wee profejfe that weeknow GOD : butbywork.es wedenyhim. 
For Beatitude doth not confifl in the knowledge of diuine things , but in a. 
■ diuine life : for the YDeuBs know them better than men. Beatitudon pn 
eft diuinorurjxcogRitio^ fed vitadiuina. And certainly there is nothing 
more to bee admired , and more to bee lamented , than thepriuat contention, 
thepaffionate dijpute, the per fonaU hatred, and the perpetuall want-,, maf- 
facres, And murders , for Religion among Chriftian s : the dijcourje where- 
of hath fo occupied the World, as it hath well neare driuen the prattife there- 
of out of the world. Who would not foone refolue^ , that tooke knowledge 
but of the religious difputations among men , and not of their hues which 
difpute, that there were no other thing in their defires, than the pur chafe of 
'Heauen 3 and that the World itfelfe were but D fed as it ought , and as an 
Inne or place, wherein to repofe ourfelues in pacing on towards our celeftiail 
babitationlwhen on the contrary, befides the difcourfe & outward profef ion, 
th£foul^hathjwthing buthypocrifie. Wee are all ( in effect) become Come- 
dians in religion -. and while we act ingeflure and -voice , diuine <vertues, in 
all the courfe of our Hues wee renounce our Perfons , andthe parts Wee play. 
Fort^tritie, IjJ^jtnd Truth, hauebuttheir being in termes , like the 
PhiloJophersM'kteris^tima'. — 

Neither is it that wif dome, which Salomon defineth to be t he Schoole- 
Mifti-efle of the know ledge of God, that hath valuation in the world ; it 
is enough that wegiue it our good word; but the fame which is altogether ex- 
ercifedintbeferuiceofthe World, as thegathering of riches 'cheifly^y which 
we pur chafe and obtaine honour , with the many refpeds which attends. 

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Titf/£ zW^ fee ftta mark.es ,which ( ■$»/;£« "flw tee £«# o«r confciences 
to the bigbefl ) wee alljboote at. For the obtayning thereof it is true , that 
the care is our owne ; the care our owne inthis life-,, the peril! our owne in 
the future : andyetwhenwe haue gathered the greateft aboundance^,, wee 
our jelues enioy no more thereof, thanfo much as belongs to one man. For 
the reft j Hee that had the greateft wifdome-, , and the greateft ability that 
euer man had , hath tdld<us that this is the <-vfe : When goods increafe 
(faith Salomon) they alfo increafe thar eat them j and what good com- ^i^- 1 * 
meth to the Owners, but the beholding thereofwith their eyes ? As 
for thofe that deuour the reft , and follow <-vs in fair e weather : theyagaine 
for fake a>s in the fir ft tempeft of misfortune-, , and fleer e away before the 
Sea andWinde 5 leauing otf to the malice of our deftinies. Ofthefe , among 
a thouf and examples , / will take but one out ofMaifter Dannet , and <vfe 
his owne -words : Whileft the Emperour Charles the flft, after the refig- 
nation of his Eftates , flayed at Vluftiing for winde , to carrie him his 
laftiournieintoSpaine; Hee conferred on atimewith Seldiiis, his 
brother Ferdinands Embafladour , till the deepe of the night. And 
when Seldiiis (hould depart : the Emperour calling for fome of his 
feruants, and no bodie anfwering him ( for tho fe that attended vpon 
him, were fome gone to theirlodgings , andallrhe reftafleepe)the 
Emperour tooke vp the candle him-felfe , and went before Seldiiis to 
light him downe theftaires 5 and fo did, notwithstanding all the re- 
finance that Seldiiis could make. And when Hee was come to the 
ftaires foot, He faid thus vnto him : Seldiiis, remember this of Charles 
the Emperour, when hee lhalbe dead and gone, ThatHim,whome 
thou haftknowneinthy time enuironed with lb many mighty Ar- 
mies,and Guards offouldiors,thou haft alfo feenealone,abandoned, 
and forfaken , yea euen of his owne domefticall feruants. &c. 1 ac- 
knowledge this change of Fortune to proceed from the mighty hand 
of G D >y which I will by no meancs goe about to withftand. 

But you will fay that there are fome things elfe , and of greater regard 
thanthe former. Thefirft^isthereuerendrefpetlthat is held of great men, 
■ and the Honour done -unto them by all forts of people. And it is true indeed: 
prouidedjhat an inward lone for their iuftice andpiety, accompany the out- 
ward worfbipgiuen to their places and power without which what is the ap- 
. plaufe of the Multitude, but as the outer ie of an Heard of Animals, who 
Without the knowledge of 'any true caufe , pleafe them-felues With the noyfe 
they male.,*. For feeing it is a thing exceeding rare , to diftinguifh Vertue \ 
and Fortune: the moft impious ( ifprofperous ) haue euer beene applauded; - 
the mo ft <-vertuous (if nmprofpcroiis) haue euer beene defpifed. For as 
Fortunes manrides the Horfe, fo Fortune her-felfe rides the Man. Ilfooy 
when hee is defended and on footer : the Man taken from bis Beaft , and 
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Fortune from the Man ; a bafegroome hates the one, and a bitter contempt 
Jpurnes at the other, with equall libertie. 

Thefecond\U the gr earning ofourpoflerity,andthe contemplation of their 
glory whomeweeleauebebindrvs. Certainly, of thofe which conceiue that 
their foules departed take any comfort therein , it may truly befaid of them, 
which La&antiusfpake of certaine Heathen Philosophers , quod fapieiv 
tes funt in re ftulra. For when ourfpi rits imm ortauTbalbe oncefeperaU 
from our mortall bodies, anddifpofedby GOD: there remaineth inthem no 
other ioy of their poflerity which fucceed , than there doth of pride in that 
flone^, which fleepethintbeWallof a Kings Palace; nor any other forrow 
for their pouertie, than there doth ofjhame inthat, which beareth -up a Beg- 
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f^t W " eorumfill i quiaanimae mortuorum rebus viuentiumnon interfunr.- 
The dead though holy , know nothing of theliuing, no, not of their 
owne children : for the foules of thofe departed , arc not conuerfanr 
with their affaires that remaine. And ifwee doubt of SaintAuspftinc, 
wee cannot of lob j whotchrvs, That wee know not if our fonnes 
fhalbe honorable: neither fhall wee vnderfhnd concerning them, 
whether they fhalbe of low degree. WhichEcckCiaacsalfoconfermeth: 
Man walketh in a fhadow , and difquieteth him-fclfe in vainc : hee 
heapethvp riches, andcannot tell who fhali gather them. Theli- 
uing (faithhee) know that they fhall die, but the dead know nothing 
at all . forwhacanfhewvntoman, what fhalbe after him vnder the 

*«;*.r.cbr.2.Sunne ? Heetbereforeaccompteditamongtbsrefl of 'worldly >vanities, to 
labour andtrauaile in the world; not knowing after death, whether afoole or 
a Wife manfhould enioy the fruits thereof: which made mee {faith hee) 
endeauour euen to abhorrc mine owne labour. And what can other 
tnenhope,whofebleffedorforrowfullefiates after death GOD hathrefer- 
ued \ mans knowledge lying bum his hope ; feeing the Prophet Efai confefi 
fethoftheeletl, That Abraham is ignorant of vs , and Ifraelknowes 
vs not. But hereof wee are ajfured,that the long and darke night of death 
( of whofe following day wefiallneusr beholdthedawne, M bis returne that 
hath triumphed oner it )JhaU couer <vs ouer,M the world bee no more. Af 
^^hicb,andwhenwee/}jallagainereceiueOrgmsglorifiedandincorrup- 
{ in f easo f An i elicaa 4^ions : info great admiration /ball the foules 
ophebkjfedbeeexercifed , asthey cannot admit the mixture of any fecond 
o r l Y™y)normyrmirneofforegone 

kindred or children. Ofwhome whether wee /hall retaine any particular 
knowledge, or in any fort diUmgui/btbem : nomncaaffirea,,., andthe 
Wtfeflmendoubt But on the contrary Jfadiuine life retaine any of }hofe 
faculttcs whtcbthefiule exercifedin amortajlbody ; wee jhaUotattL 
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of their felicities which remains in the W^rld. No j bee their estates grea- 
ter than euer the World gaue-> y Wee /ball (by 'the difference hnowne <-vnto 
rus ) euen deteft their consideration . And whatfoeuer comfort flail remains 
cfallforepaft,thefame will confift in the charitie, which we exercifed lining: 
andin thatPietie-,, Iuflice-,, andfirme Faith 7 for which itpleafedthe infi- 
nite mercy of GOD to accept of rvs, andreceiue ai S . Shall we therefore 
rvalue honour and riches at nothing ? and neglect them , as <vnnecefarie 
and n)aine ? certdnlie no. For that infinite wifdome of GOD, which 
hath diftingui/bed bis AngeUs by degrees : which hath giuen greater and leffe 
light.,-, and beauties, to Heauenly bodies : which hath made differences be- 
tweene beafts and birds : createdthe Eagle and the fie.,, the Cedar and the 
Shrub : and among (tones, giuen the f aire ft tincture to the Ruble-,, and the 
quickeft light to the Diamond ; hath alp ordained Kings, Dukes or Leaders 
of the people, Magistrates, Iudges, and other degrees among men. And as 
honour is left to pofteritit-, , for a marke andenfgne of the <vertue andyn- 
derftanding of their Anceftors :fo , feeing Siraciaespreferreth Death be- sir "^ - v - i 
fore Beggeric : and that titles, without proportionable estates, fall <vnder 
the mifer able fuccour of other mens pittie^. ; IaccomptitfoolifJmejTetocon- 
demne fitch a care : Prouided , that worldly goods bee well gotten , andtha:- 
Wee raife not our owne buildings out of other mens mines. For as Plato 
dothfirft preferrethe perfection of bodilie health ;fecondly , the forme and 'pi*. Megs* 
beautie; andthirdly, D iuitias nulla frau d e^uaefitas : foHieremie cries, t,e "" GQr & i 
Woe vnto them that ere£ttheir houfes by vnrishteoufneile , and, 
their chambers without cquitie : and Efai the fame, Woe to thole 
thatfpoyle and were not fpoyled. Anditwas out of the true wij dome 
o/Salomon, thathee commandeth<vs, nottodrinkethewineorvio-p,,,^ r . 
lence j notto lie in wait for bloud ; and not to fwallow them vp aliue, *""•* ?■ i>j 
whofe riches wee cOuec ; for fuch are the wages (faith hee ) of euery ' M ' b ' 9 ' 
one that is greedy of gaine. 

And if wee could affoord our felues but fo muchleifure as to confider, 
That heewhkhhathmoftin the world,hath,i n refpect of the world, nothing 
in it : and that he which hath the longeft time lent him to Hue in it, hathyet 
no proportion at all therein , Jetting it either by that which is past when wee 
Werenot , or by that time which is to comein which wee /ball 'abide for euer: 
If a h if both, to wit our proporti onint he world , and our time in the World, 
differ not m uch from thatwMcMsjnotbmgj it is not out of any excellency of 
r vnderslanding i thatWee fo muchprife the one, which hath ( in effect )no be- 
ing : andfo much neglect the other , which bath no ending : coueting thofs 
mortall things oft he world,as ifourfoules Were therein immortaU , and neg- 
lecting thofe things which areimmortaU,as if our felues after the world were 
but mortall. 

But let euery man make his owne wifdome , as hee pleafeth. Let the 

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Rich manthinkeaUfooles, that cannot ecpuaUbis aboundance^; the Reven- 
ger etteeme ail negligent* , that haue not troden downe their opposes ; the 
Politician, allgrojje, that cannot merchandise their faith : Yet when wee 
oncTcome in fight of the Port of death , to -which aR winds driue <vs j and 
when by letting fall t hat fatall Anchor, which canneuer be weighed 'againe, 
the Navigation of this life takes end : Then it is I fay, that our owne cogi- 
tations ( thojefad and feitere cogitations , formerly beaten from >vs by our 
Health and Felicities) returne againe, and pay ys tothe<vttermoslfor 
all the pleafing paffages of our Hues pafl . It it then that wee ctxe out to 
G Dfor mercies ; then , when our jelues can no longer exercife cruelty 
towards others : and it is onely then , that wee areflrucken through thefoule 
with this terrible fentenczs , That GOD will not be mockt. For if 
according to SaintPetct , Therkhteousfcarcely bee faued : and that 
GOD fpared not his Angeils : where jhall thofe appeare , who , kauing 
ferued their appetites all their liues,prefumetothmke , that tbefeuerecom- 
mandements of the All-powerfull GOD Were giuen but infport ; and that 
thefbort breath , which wee draw when death preffetb <vs , if wee can but 
fafiion it to tbefound of Mercy (without any kinde of fatiffaclion or 
amends) isfuficient ? O quam m\Au,faitb a reuerend Father ', Cum hac 
fpe ad eternos labores gt beila defcendunt : / confeffe that it is agreat 
comfort to ourfri :nds t to haue it f aid-thai Wee ended well ; for wee all defire 
(<t* Balaam did)to die the deathofihe righteous. But what JbaUwee 
calladifefteeming, anappofmg, or[ indeed) a mocking of GO D; iftbofe 
men doe not appofe him , dijefleeme him ,and mocke him ,that thinke it enough 
for GOD , to asks himforgiitemffe at leifure, with the remainder andlatt 
drawing of a tnalitious breath I For what doe they other-wife , that die 
this kinde of well-dying-, but fay rdnto GOD dsfolloweth \ Wee befeecb thee 
G D 5 that all thefalfboods , forfwearings, and treacheries of our Hues- 
pafl, may be pleafng njntothees; that thou wilt for our fakes (that haue 
badm leifnre to doe any thing for tbine^ ) change thy nature ( though impof. 
frble)andforgetio bee a iutt GOD s that thou wilt hue iniuries-and op- 
prefions, call ambition wijlome , and charity foolifbneffe. For lfjallpr<e- 
iudicemyfonne Xwhicb I am •■ rejoined not to doe) if Imakereflftution; and 
confeffe myfelfe to haue beene rvniuft (which lam too pr-oud to doe )ifl 
ddiuer the oppreffed. Certainly jthefe, wife Worldlings haue either found out 
anew GOD; or haue made One : andinall likelihood fuch a Leaden One > 
^^msthee!euentbwareinhisCappeiwbicb,whenhehadcaufedanytbat 
hefeared,or hated jo be killed ,hee Would take it from his- head and kiffeiu : 
befeechingk topardonhimthis one euillail more, and it fiould be the lafi f 
whicb,(as at other times ) bee did; when bytbepraaifeofa Cardinally** 
falfified Sacrament., becaufedtbe Earleof Armagnack to bee ftabbed to 
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euer-liuing GOD. But of this compofition are all the deuout loners of the 
-World, that they feare all that is durelefe and ridiculous : theyfearetbe 
■plots and praclijes of their oppo Cites, and t heir "very whifperings . thy feare 
theppwions of men which beat but njponfhadowss : they flatter and forfake 
the • prosperous and <vnpr offer oics ■, bee they friends or Kings 'yea they dine 
rvnder Water, like Ducks, at euerypebble.fi one, that sbutthrowne towards 
them by apowerf ill hand : and on the contrary , t/;y [bew anobUinate and 
Giant-like-* ^valour , again ft the terrible hidgements of the All-powerfuU 
GOD: yea theyftew themfeluesgods againft GOD, and planes towards 
men • towards men whofe bodies and confidences are alike rotten. 

Now for the reU : If Wee truly examine the difference of both conditions; 
towitof the rich and mighty , wbome -pee call fortunate ; and of the poors 
and oppreffed , wbome we account- wretched : weefbaHjinde the bappinefje 
of the one, and the miferabie efiate of the other, fo tied by GOD to the ye- 
ry inftant, and both fofiibieil to interchange ( witneffe thefuddaine downe- 
f all of the greateU Princes , andtbefpeedyrvprifingofthemeanettperjons) 
as the one hath nothing fo certaine , whereof to boa ft j nor the other fo <un- 
certune-,, whereof to bewaile itfielfe->. For there is no man fo affured of 
his honour, of his riches, health, or life; but that hee may be deprived oj ei- 
ther or all, thea>erynexthoureordaytocome->. Qjidvefpcrvehat,in- 
certumeft, What the euening will bring with it, ic is vncerraine. 
And yet yee cannot tell {faith Saint lames ) whatmalbetomorrow. *, l4# ? 
To day he is fet vp , and to morrow hee (hall not bee found ; for hee 
is fumed into duft , and his purpofe perifheth. And although the aire 
which compaffeth aduerfitic* , be <very obficure ; yet therein Wee better dif- 
cerne GOD, than in thatfbinning light which enuironeth worldly glories; 
through which , for the clear eneffe thereof, there is no <uanitie-> which ef- 
capeth our fight*. And let aduerfitie feeme what it Will ; to happie men-, 
ridiculous ,who make them-Jelues merrie at other mens misfortunes j and to 
thofeynder the a:o\fe,greiuous : yet this is true-,, That for all that is paft -, 
to the 'very inftant , theportions remainning are e quail to either. For bee 
it that wee haue liued many yeares, and ( according to Salomon ) in them all 
wee haue reioyced ; orbeeit that wee bauemeafuredthe fame length of 
dales, and therein haue euer-moreforrowed : yet looking backefrom ourpre- 
fent being,We find both the one And the other ,to wit,the ioy andthe woe, fay- 
ledout of fight 3 and death, which dothpurfue njs and bold ^vs in chace,from 
our infancies , hath gathered it*. Quicquid xtatis retro eft, mors te- 
net : What-fo-euer of our age is paft , death holds it. So as who- 
fo-euer hee bee, towhome Fortune hath beene afieruant-, and the Time a 
friend : let him but take the accompt of bis memory {for Wee haue no 
other keeper of our pleafures paft ) and truelie examine what it hath 
rejerued,either of beauty andyouth,or foregone delights-, what it bathfaued, 

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£ to if wwgfe laft,ofhis deareft affections , or of -what euer elfe the amorous 
Spring-time gaue his thoughts ofcontentmenL-,then<vnualuable-> j andhee 
/hall finde that aU the art -which his elder yeares baud , candrawno other 
rvapour out ofthe fe dijfolutions -than heauic->,jecret^, andfadfighes. Hee 
fb all finde nothing remaining, but thofe forrowes, "which gro-w <vp after our 
faft-fpringingyouth; ouer-take ic , -whenitisatafland; and ouer-topit 
<vtterly, -when it beginnes to "Wither : in jo much as looking backe from the 
<very in ft ant time-., and from our now being; the poor e, difeafed, and cap- 
tiue creature , hath as little fence of all his former miferies andpaines ; as 
hee, that is moft bleft in common opinion, hathofhisfore-paffedpleafures 
and delights. For "Wh at-fo-euer is caft behindrvs , is iuft nothing : and 
-what is to come , deceiptfull hope hath jt^. Omnia qux euentura funt, 
incertoiacent. Onely thofe few black Swannes I muft except : ypboha- 
/v*-t v W£^j- ~>. u i n g had the grace to <value "Worldly /vanities at no more than their owne 
price; doe, by retayning the comfortable memorie of aypei acted life-,., be- 
hold death -without dread , andthe grauejnthoutfeare j and embrace both, 
as neceffary guideslo endl'effeglorie->. 

For my fife, this is my conflation, and all that lean offer to others •, 
that thejorrowes of this life, are but of two forts : thereof the one hath 
rejpetfto GOD; the other , to the World. ^thefrft'yJeJcVmplaineto 
GOD again ft our felues, for our offences againffbim-, andconfeffe, Ettu 
iuftuses in omnibus quxveneruntfupernos, And thou O Lord act 
iuft in all that hath befallen vs. \In the fecond -wee complaine to our 
felues again® GOD: as if hee had done <vs "Wrong , either in notgiuing T>s 
■Worldly goods and honours , anfwering our appetites : or for taking them a~ 
gainefromrvs , hauing bad them ; forgetting that humble andiuU acknow- 
ledgment of \o\^, The Lord harhgiuen , and the Lord hath taken. 
Tothefirftof-wbicbSaintPaal hath promifed Meffedneffe ; tothefecond', 
death. Andout of doubtheeis either afooleor'vngratefuUto GOD or 
bothy that doth not acknowledge, howmeanefo-euerhiseftatebee, that the 
fame is yet farre greater, thanthafwhicb GOD oweth him : ordothnot 
acknowledge, hoyp/harpefo-euerhis affliclionsbee, that the fame are yet 
farrelefte, thanthofe -whichare due nmtohim. And if an Heathen-wife 
man call the aduerfties of the -world but tributa viuendi; the tributes of 
liuing: a -wife Cbriftian man ought to kwwthem,andbeare them, but as 
the tributes ofoffending.He ought tojbearetbm man-like,andrefolued1y$st 
not as thofe -whining fouldiors «fo*,qui gementes fequuntur imperato're. 
ForfeeingGod,-who is the Author ofaUdurtrage^T, hath -written out 

forvs,andappointedysaUthepartsweamopiay:andhathnot,intheirdir- 
mbution , beene partiall to the moft mighty Princes of the -world- That 
gaue rvnto Darius the part of the greateil Emperour , and depart 
ojthjmoftmifer^hbeggr^ a begger begging -water of ^Enemi^ 

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to quench the great drought of death ; That appointedhaiaicttoplay the 

Gran Signior of theTuvkcsinthemorning, andinthe fame day theYoot- 

frooleo/Tamerlane ( both which partsVakuan had aljo play d, beeeing 

taken by Sapores) that made Bel)ifariusJ>/^ the moft wiftorious Captaine, 

and laftlythepartofa blinde beggar ; of -which examples many thcufands 

may be produced: -why ft ould other men, -who are but e] 'tbeleaflwormes; 

complaine of -Wrongs \ Certainly there is no other account to be made of this 

ridiculous -world, than to refolus, That the change of fortune on the great 

. Theater, is but as the change of garments on the leffe. For when on the one 

and the other, euery man -weares but his crwne shin ; the Players are all alike. 

No-wifanyman,out of-weaknes,priJethepajfages oftbisytoiidother-wife 

(for faith Petrarch, Magni ingemj eft reuocare mentern a fen- 

fibus) it is by reafon of that r-jnhappie fantafie ofours,-wbicbfor<yethin 

the braines of Alan all the miferies (the corporal i excepted) yohereunto bee is 

fubieel : Therein it is, that Misfortune and Aduerftie yporke all that they 

■worke. For jeeing Death jn the end of the Play, ta kesfrom all , wbatfoeuer 

Fortune or Force takes from any one : it -were afoolifj madnes in the~fhfp. 

ieracke of -worldly things, -where all finkes but the Sorrow, tofaueit. That 

were,as Semcajaith,Vottanx(uccumbcre,quod triftius eft omnifato, 

to fall vnder r ortune, of ail other the moft miferable deflinie, 

But it is now time to found aretrait; and to defire tobeexcufedofthis 
long pur fat : and-withall, that the good intent, which hath mouedme^ to 
draw thepitture oft'mepafti-which we call Hiftorie) info large a table, may 
aljo be accepted inplace of a better reafon. ' ~~ 

The examples ofdiuineprouidence, euery where found (the fir ft diuinc^ 
Hiftorie! being nothing elje but a continuation offuch examples ) haue per- 
vaded me to fetch my beginning from the beginning of all things ; to -wit, 
Creation. For though theje fWo glorious ablions of the Almigbiie be jo ncare, 
and (as it were) linked together, that the one necejfarily imply eth the other : 
Creation,inferring Prouidence-. (for what Father for fketb the child that he 
hath begotten}) and ' Prouidence prejuppofng Creation) Yet many oftbofe 
that baiiefeemedto excell in worldly wifedome , hauegone about to difioyne 
this coherence ; the Epicure denying both Creation fcf Prouidence, butgran- 
tingthattbe-world bada beginning ithe AuRotelmngranting Prouidence y 
but denyingbotb the Creation and the Beginnim. 

Now although this doBrine of Faith, touching the Creation intime[for\>y 
Faith wevnderftand,thatthc world wasmadebytheword of God)fe 
too weighty awork for Ariftotles rotten grmndtpfeare 'vp, ypon -which he 
hath{mt^ithftan^ing)foimedildelTefences^Fortreffes of all his Verbal! 
Dotlrine-.Tetthatthe neceffttie cfinfinitepower,andthe-worlds beginning, 
andtheimpofsibilityofthe contrary cuenin tbeiudgement of Natural! rea- ~~ 
fon,TPbereinbee beleeued, badnot better informed him; it is greatly to bee 

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maruailedat,. And it is no leffeftrange, that thofe men -which are defrous 
of knowledge (feing Ariftotle hath fay led in this mainepoynt^; Mid taught 
litle other than termes in the re& ) hauefo retrench their mindesfrom the 
following and ouertaking of truth , andfoabfolutelyfubiecledthem-feluesto 
the law of thofe Philojophicall principles j as all contrary kinde of teaching, 
in the fear ch ofcaufes, they haue condemned either j or phantafiicall, or curi- 
ous . But doth itfollosv , that thepofitions of Heathen Philofophers , are 
ryndoub ted grounds an d principles indee d , b ecaufefo called ? Or that ipfi 
dixerunt , doth make them to beefuch ? certainly no. But this is true-> y 
That -where naturaE reafon hath built any thing fo fir ongagainft it felfe , as 
the fame reafon can hardly ajfaile it-,-, much lejfe batter it downe~> : the fame 
in eueryqueftion of Nature^, and finite power, may beeapprouedfor a fun- 
damentally of humane knowledg. For faith Gharron in his Booke of 
•wifdoms,Tout proportion humaine a autant d' authorise que l'autre, 
fi la raifon n' on fait la difference ; Euery humane prop ortion hath^ 
equall authoritie, if reafon nuke not the difference, the reft being but 
the fables of principles. But hereof how (hall the njprightand >vnpartiall 
iudgment ofmangiue a fentence^jwhere oppofition and examination are not 
admitted to giue in euidencc^ \ And to this purpofe it -was "WeUfaid of 
Lacfantius, Sapientiam fibi adimunt, qui fine vlloiudicioinuenra 
maiorumprobant,&abaliispecudummoreducuntur : They neg- 
lect their owne wifdome , who without any iudgment approue the 
iuuention of thofe that fore-went them j and fuffer them-felues,after 
the manner of Beafts, to bee led by them. By the aduantage of -which 
flouth andduUneffe , ignorance is now become fopo-WerfuH a Tyrant. : as it 
hath fet true Philofophie , Phifick , a ndDiuinitv ? in a Pillory Imd-written 
ouertbefirft,Contra. negantem Principiaj ouertbefecond-, Vertus fpeci- 
fica 5 andouerthetbird,Ticde{}3LRom.ana. 

Butformyfelfe-,- > lfba!lneuerbeeperfwadeditbatGODbath/butrvp 7 
all light of Learning -within the lanthorne of Ariftorlcs braines ; or that ie ( 
"Waseuerfaid-vntohim, asnvntoEtdras, Accendamin CordetuoLu- 
cernamintelleaus :that GOD hath giuen indention but to the Heathen; 
and that they onely haue innjaded Nature^, and found the flrength andbot- 
tome thereof; the fame nature hauing confumedallberflore^, and left no- 
thing of price to after-ages. That theft andthefebee the caufes ofthefe and 
thejee^eScs , Time hath 'taught <ds ; andnotreajon : andfo hath experi- 
ence^, -without Art.,. The Cheeje-wife knoweth it as -Well as the Philofo- 
pherjbatfowre Runnet doth coagulate her milke into a curdc-,. But if -wee 
aske a reafon of this can fe, -why thefowreneffe doth it. ? -whereby it doth it* 
andthe manner how} Ithinketbat there isnothing to beefoundin vulgar 
Philofophie , tofatiffie this and many other like vulgar queftions. But 
tnan,tocouer his ignorancein the leaft things, -who cannot gwe a true reafon 

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for the Grafervnderhisfeetc, *tohy it ffyouldbee greener other thenred, 
or of any other colour $ that could neueryet difeouer the way andreafon of 
Natures working j inthofewhich are farre leffe noble creatures thanhim- 
Jelfe ; who k fane more Noble than the Heauens them-felues : Man 
(faith Salomon ) that can hardly difcerne the things that are vpon the mmp* 
fcarth, and with great labour finde out the things that are before vsj 
that hathfojhort a time in the world , as hee no foonerjbeginnei to learne-, 
than to die ; that hath in his memory but borrowed knowledge ; in hii<vn~ 
demanding, nothing trulie 5 that is ignorant of the Effeme of his ownefoule y 
and which the wijefl of the Naturalifts (if Axiilottebeehee) could neuer 
Jo much as define , but by the Action and effect , telling <z»x what it yvorkes 
( which all men know as well as hee )but not what it is , which neither hee y 
noranyelfe, doth know , but G D that created it ; ( for though I were 
perfect, yet I know not my fouk,faitbloh. )ManIfay, that is but an 
Jdiotin the next cat fe ofhisownelifc^, and in the can fe of alltheaclions 
of his life-, : will ( notwithstanding ) examine the art ofG D in crea- 
ting the World ; of GOD who (faith lob ) is fo excellent as wee knowe 
him not; andexaminethe beginning of the worke, which had end before ^-^ 
Man-kind had a beginning of being. Hee will difable GODS power to 
make a world.without matter to make it of. He will rather glue the mothes 
of the Aire for a caufe 5 eafi the worke on necefity or chance ; be flow the ho- 
nour thereof on Nature ; maketwopowers, the one to be the Author of the 
Matter , the other of the Forme j andlaftly , for want of a worke-man, 
haue it Eternal! -.which latter opinion Ariftotle, to make kim-felfe the Au- 
thor of anew Dotfrine, brought into the World : and his Setlatours haue 
tnainetainedit, ; paratiac coniurati,quos fequuntur, Philofophorum 
animis irmidf is opiniones tueri. For Hermes , who liuedat oncewith, 
orfooncafter,MofQ h Zoroafter, Mufarus, Orpheus , Linus, Anaxi- 
inencsjAnaxagoras^mpedoclesjMelilTus^herecydesjThales^Cle- 1 ''' 8 ^ 
anthes,Pythagotas,Plato,dKd 'many others (whofe opinions are exauifite- 
ly gathered by Steuehius Eugubinus ) found inthenecefitie of "muimible 
reafon,Onc eternaland infiniteBeing,fo be theParentofthirvniuerfaU. 
Horum omnium fententia quamuis fit incerta,eodem tamenipectaf, 
VtProuidentiam vnam effe confentiant : flue enimNatura, fiue &. 
ther,fiue Ratio, fiue mens, fiue fatalis neceffttas, fiue diuina Lex* 
idem etle quod a nobis dicitur Deus : All thefe mens opinions (faith 
Laclantius ) though vncertaine , come to this ; That they agree 
vpon one Prouidence ; whether the fame bee Nature , or light, or 
Reafon, orvnderftanding, or deitinie, or diuine ordinance; that itis 
thefamevvhich wecall GflD. Certainely, as all the Riuers in the world, 
though they haue diuers rifings, and diners runnings; though theyfome-times 
hide them-felues for awhile <vnder ground, andfeemeto be loft in Sea-like 

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Lakes ; doe at laftfinde, and fail into the great Ocean : fo after all the fear- 
ches that humaine capacitie hath ; and after all PhilofophicaR contemplation 
andcwioftie ; mtheneceftitieofthisinfinitepower, all the reaj on of matt 
ends and dijfolue sit Jelfe. 

Asfor others; andfirfl touching thofe, which conceiue the matter of the 
World to haue been eternall, and that Goddidnot create the world ex nihi- 
\o, but ex materia prjeexiilente ; the Supposition isfo weake, as is hardily 
worth the anfwering. For (faith Eufebius) Mihividenturquihoc du 
Eufi :diprt(. cunt > forrunam quoqu? Deo anne&ere, They feeme vnto me,which 
mng,t. 7 j.t, a ffi rm e this,to giue part of the work to God,and part to Fortune : w\ 
fomuch as ifGodbadnot found this firit matter by chance > He had neither^ 
been Author, nor Father, nor Creator, nor Lord of the VniiierfaU. For were 
the Matter or Chaos , eternall : it then follows, That either thisjuppofed 
Matter did ft- it jelfe to God; or God, accommodate himfelfeto the matter J 
For the fir ft; it isimpofsib'e, that things without fenfe could proportion 
themfehes to the Workmans will. For thefecond ; it were horrible to conceiut 
of God) That as an Artificer he applied himfelfe , according to the proporti- 
on of Matter which heligfaeda/pon. 

But let it be juppofed, That this matter had been made by any Power , 
not Omnipotent-, and infinitely wife ; I would gladly learne how it came ta 
paffefbat the fame was proportionable to his intention, thatwasOmnipo* 
tent and infinitely Wife j andno more, nor no lejfe, thanferuedto receiue the] 
forme oftheVniuerfall. For, had it wanted any thing of what wdsfuffici- 
ent 5 then muft it be granted, 1 hat God created out of nothing^*? much of 
new matter, asferued to finifb the worke of the World : Or bad there been* 
moreofthis mattexjhanfufficed; then didGoddifiolueisf annihilate what- 
foeuer remained and 'w as fuperfluo us. And this muft eUeryreafonablefoule 
confeffe, That it is the fame worke of God alone , to create any thing out of 
nothing, And by the fame art and power, and by none other, can thofe 
things, or any part of that eternall matter , bee againe changed into No- 
thing j by which thofe things, that once were nothing , obtained a beginning 
ofbeing. 

Againe, tofay that this matter Was the caufe of it Jelfe; thiSi of 'all o- 
ther, Were thegreateft idiotifme. For, if it were the caufe of it J f elf "eat any 
time ; then there Was alfo a time when it felf e was not ; at which time-, of 
not being, it is eafie enough to conceiue, that it could neither produce it felfe± 
nor anything elfe. For to be, and not to be, at once, is impoffible. Nihil au- 
teva feipfum prscedit, neq ; feiptum componit corpus. There is no- 
thing that doth precede it felfe, neither doe bodies compound them* 
felues. 

For the reft ; Thofe thatfaine this matter to be eternall, muft ofneceffitie 
confeffei that Infinite cawtt befepar#efrom Etemitie, And then had infi- 
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nire matter left no place for infinite forme , but that the firftmatter was 
finite , the forme which it receiued proues it,. For conclufionofthis 
part i who-Jo-euer will make cboyce, rather to beleeue in et email deformitie, 
or in et email dead matter, than in eternal! light and et email life ; let et email 
death be his rewat d. For it is a madnejje of that kind, as wanteth tearmes 
to t vprefe it. For what reajon of man ( whome the curje of prefumption 
. I ■ ,<no:ftupified) hathdoubted, That infinite power ( of which wee can *- • 
cpmp ehendbutakindofjbadow,quia comprehenfio eft intra terminos, 
qui infinito repugnant ) batb any tbingwantingin it feife, either for mat- 
ter or forme ; yea for as many worlds ( iffuch hadbeene GODS will ) 
astheSezhatbfands ? For where the power is Without limitation ; the 
Wor k hath no other limitation, than the workmans will. TeaRe,:fonitfelfe 
findes it more eafie for infinite power, to deliuerfrom it f elf e a finite world, 
witboutthe belpe of matter prepared i than for afiniteman, afooleand 
duU, to changethe forme of matter made to his hands. TbeyareDiony* 
fius his words , Deus in vna exiftentia omnia prxhabet : andagaine 
Efte omnium eft ipfe Diuinitas,omne quod vides,& quod non vides; 
to wit , caufaliter, or inbetter tearmes, non tamquam forma, fed tan. 
quam caufa vniuerfahs. Neither hath the world wniuerjaMofed rvp 
atlofGOD. For the moft parts of hisworkes (faith Siracides) are 
hid. Neither can the depth of his Wifdome be openedjy the glorious work c * ,, *" t "' 
of the world : which neuer brought to knowledge all it can 5 for then were 
bis infinite power bounded, and made finite. And hereof it comes, 1 bat we 
feldome entitle GOD the all-fhewing , or the all-willing ; but the all- 
mighty /bat is, infinitely able. 

Butnowfortbofe, who fromthat ground , Thatoutof nothingno- 
thingis made , inferre the Worlds eternity, and yet not fofaluage therein, 
as thofeare,whichgiueanetemall being to dead matter : It is true, if the 
Word (nothing) bee taken inthe affirmatiue , and tbevaakinv,impofed 
rvpon Natural! Agents and finite power; That out of nothing, nothing is 
tnade^. But feeing their great Doflour Ariftotle bimfelfe confefth, 
quod omnes antiqui decreuerunt quafi quoddam rerum principium, 
ipfum infinitum, That all the ancient decree a kind of beginning , 
and the fame to bee infinite : and a little after, more largely andplainely, 



W I ? . 



Principium eius eft nullum, fed ipfum omnium cernituretTeprinci- ««*.£..,, 
pium ,ac omnia complefti ac regere : it isfirange that this Philofipher, «S£,t* 
yotthhis followers,fbould 'rather make choice out of falfhood, toconclude 
fafly ; than out of truth , t e refolue truely. For if wee compare the world 
VmuerfaR,andaU the rvnmeafurable Orbes ofHeauen, andthofe merueilous 
bodies of the%nr\ne,Mooac,andStzues{PPith ipfum infinitum : it may 
truely beef aid of them all, which him-felfe ajfirmetb of his imaginary Ma- 
teria prima, That they are neither quid, quale, nor quantum 3 andtbere- 

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foreto bring finite (which bath no proportion with infinite) outof infinite 
( qui delimit omncm proportionem ) is no ponder in GOD S power 
j^r^r tf Ana X imander,Mcliirus,WEmp«iocles,^ffowrW 
rvuuerfall, but particulam VniuerfitatisWinfinitatis, aparcellot 
that which is the vniucrfalitie and the infinirie it felfe ; and Plato, but 
a fliadow of GOD . But the other, to ptoue the worlds etemtie, 
rvnetb this Maxime , That, A mtficient and effeauall caufe being 
granted , an anfwerableeffeftthereof is alfo granted : infemng,that 
GODbeingforeuer afufficknt and cpaiidlcaijeoj the world, tbeegetl 

ofthecaujeflmddalfobaue beene for euer ; towit, theworld <vni*erfaB. 
Butwhataftrang mockerie isthisinfo greataMaifler ^oconfefjeajuf- 
ficient'.mdef'auMca^feoftheWorld, {to wit an almighty GOD) inhis 
Antecedent ; and the fame GODtobeaGOD refrained in his conclufon; 
to makeG D free in power , and bound in will ; able to ejfeft , vnableta 
determine ; able to rn.de all things,andyet ynable to make choyce of the time 
when ? For this were impioufly to rejolue of GOD, as of natural necef- 
fitie-,) which hath neither choice, nor ■will.nor'vnderftanding; which can- 
not but WorXmamr being prefenL, ; as fir o , to burne things combufiible. 
- Agame be thus difputeth , That euery Agent which can worke, and doth 
notworkc^ : ifitafter-wardworke^^ itiseithertheretomouedbyitfelfe, 
or by fome-wbat elfe^ ; and fo it paffetb from power to Aft. But GOD 
(faith be ) is immouable, and 'is neither mowed by bim-felfe,nor by any other; 
but beingalwaies tbefame,dotb alwaies worke ; Whence he concludeth, if the 
WorldWerecaufedbyGOD, tbatbeewas for euer the caufe tb.reof-, mi 
therefore eternal}. The anjwer to this is <very eafe^ , For that GODS 
performing in due time that- , which bee euer determined at lergth toper* 
formd, doth not argue any alteration or change, but rather conflantiein 
him. For the fame aft ion of bis Will , which made the world for euer , did 
alfo with- hold the effeB to the time ordained. To this an/were, init felfe 
fuffirient- ,others adde further, that thepatterne or Image of the World may 
befaidto beeternall : which the Platonic! s c<jfl,lpirituaicm mundum ; 
and doe inthis fort diflinguifi) the \dxa, WCreationintime. Spiritu. 
M0. Ticmjc, ahs Me mundus,mundi huius exemplar , primumque Dei opus, vita 
immort. Am'. X q m \i e ft Architeao ; fuit Temper cum illo , eritque fumper. Mun- 
dus autem corporalis , quod fecundum opus ell Dei , deceditiamab 
opifice ex parte vna, quia nonfuit Temper; retinet alteram, quia fa 
Temper futurus . That reprefentatiue , or the intentionall world 
(fay they ) the fampler of this vifiblc world , the firft worke of GOD t 
was acqually ancient with the Architedjfor it was for euer with him, 
and euer (halbe. This material! world ,the fecond worke or creature 
of G D, doth differ from the worker in this, That it was not from 
euerlafting, and in this it doth agree, that it mall be for euer to come. 

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The fir ft point-, That it was notforeuer , aUCbrifliansconfejJe : Tie other 
they <vnderftand no other-wife , tW t/;<# ^/f^r theconfummation of this 
Worldthire flnlbe a new HeauenandanewEarth; withoiitany new 
creation of mat rer. But ofthefe things "ft e need not here ft and to argue : 
though fuch opinions bee not unworthy the propounding ; in this cenfidera- 
tion,ofan eternall andvnchangeable caufe ^producing a changeable and tem- 
porall effect. 1 ouching which point Proclus the Platonill dijpureth, 
That the compounded e [fence of the I for Id ( and becaufe compounded, there- 
fore difiipable ) is continued-, and knit to the Diuine Being, by an indiuiduall 
an dinfeper able power, flowing from diuine <vnitie-.\ and that the il'orlds 
natural! appetite ofG D fheweth , that the fame proceedeth from agood- 
neffe and <-vnderslanding diuine ; and that thisrvertue , by which the World 
is continued and knit together , mufl be infinite , that it may infinitely and e- 
uer lastingly continue andprefcrue thefame^. Winch infinite Vertue , the 
finite World (faich he ) is not capable of , butrectiuethit jrom the diuine 
infinite., , according to the temporall Nature it hath , (uccepliuely euery mo- 
ment by little and little^ j e.ien as the whole Material! World is not alto- 
gfth.r : but the abolijhd parts are departed by fmall degrees , and the 
parts yet to come^. , doe by the fame fmall degrees fucceed; as the jhadow 
of a tree in a Riuer , Jeemeth to haue continued the fame a long time m the 
Water, butitis perp.tually renewed, in the continual! ebbing and flowing 
thereof. 

But to renime to them,which denying that euer the World had any legin- 
ttingiWithaU denic that euer it fl)all haue any end; and to thispurpofe ajfirme , 
That it Was neucr heard, neuer read-, neuerfeene , no not by any reajon per- 
ceiued , that the Heauens haue euer fuffcred corruption 5 or that they 
eppeareany way the Elder by continuance^ j or in any fort other-wife then 
they Werc^ ; which had they beenefubietl tofinall corruption , fome change 
would haue becne difcerned info long a time^ : To this it is anfwered, 
That the little change asyetperceiued,doth rather proue their newneffe, and 
that thy haue not continued fo long j than that they will continue for euer 
as they are-,. And if conietturaU arguments may receiue an/wer by con- 
jectures : itthenfeemeth , that fome alteration may be found. For either 
Ariftotle , Plinie , Strabo , Beda , Aquinas , andothers , wefegroffeiy ^"if;""- *■ 
mifiaken : or elfethofe parts of the world, lying within the burnt Zone, s m % Mda 
Were not in elder times habitable-- , by reafon of the Sunnes he -l, ; neicher ,\ I Ti'xZ'* 
Were the Seas , render the EquinoBiaS , nauigable. Bu; wee know by 'Jfj '"• 
experience^, thatthofe Regions, fofituate, are filled with p-ople-,, 
and exceeding temperate-.; and the Sea, oner which wee Nauigite-,, 
paffable enough. Wee read alfo many H&ories of deluges : and how 
that in the time 0/"Phaeton, diners places in tbeworldwen burnt <vp y 
by the Sunnes njiolent heat. 

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iMi'ff rf Jfori , f his obferuation is exceeding feeble^. For ~»e know it 
for certains , Tbatfion'e--wa!!s , of matter moldring and friable, baue flood 
two, orthreee thoufand yeares : that maty things baue beene digged nxp 
out of the earth , of that depth , as Juppofed to baue beetle buried by the 
general! floud ; "Without any alteration either of Jubilance or figure-, yea, 
it is beleiued , and it is n>ery probable , tbattljejroldjwbich is daily found 
inMynes, and Rocks , <vnder ground^jwaisreated -together "With the 
Earth. 

And if bodies elementaric-* , and compounded, the elded times baue 
not innaded and corrupted : -what great alteration Jhould -wee lookefor 
in Calefiiall and quintepntial! bodies ? And yet 'wee baue reafon to 
tkinkc-, , that ibe Sunnc^, by -whoje helpe all Creatures are generate, 
doth nop inib&fb latter Mesafifit Natute l: asJiere-tg^for^. We baue nei- 
ther Gyants , fucb as the eldefi -world had : nor mighty men , fucb as the 
elder "World had $ but all things in general! are reputed of leffe njertue , 
"which from the Heauens receiue afertuc->. Whence > if the nature of a 
Preface -wouldpermit a larger difcourfe , -wee might eafily fetch fiore of 
proofs; as that this -world JhaU at length baue end , as that once it had 
beginning. 

And I fee no good aunfw-r that can bee made to this cbieBibn ': If 
the World -were eternal! ; "Why not all thinges in the World Eternal! ? 
If there -were no firft , no caufe , no Father , no Creator , . no in- 
comprehenfible wifdome , hut that etiery Nature had beene a-like-, 
eternally and Matt more rational than euery other Nature : Why had 
not the eternal! reafon of Man , prouided for his eternal! beeing in the 
World} For if all -were equaU : -why not equal! conditions to all ? 
•whyfboiU heauenly bodies Hue for euer >, andtbe bodies of 'Menrotte and 

AgaintL, , -who "Was it that appointed the Earth to keepe the center, 
mdgdue Order that it fbould hang intbe Aire-, : thatthe Sunne Jhould 
trauaile between* the Tropicks, and neutr exceed 'thofe boundes, norfaile 
to performs that Progrejfe once 'in euety yearc : the Moone to Hue by bor~ 
rowed lights : the firft jlnrres ( accordingto common opinion)to be faflnei 
lifyNailes in a Can~-wbeel^, ; and the Planets to -wander at their plea- 
furc^t dnfmneoftbefebadpowerouerdtber: -Was it out of Charity 
and LoufL, , that the Sunne by his perpetual! trauaile -Within thofe two 
Circles y hath<vifited, giuenlight nmto , andreleiued all parts of the 
Earthy and the Creatures therein, by tutnes andtimesl OutofdoubtL, 
if the Sunne haue of his owne accord kept this courfe in aU eternities; 

HefnayiiMlybecanedet(rnaacbarity 3 andet^rlafiingLoue.Thefamemay 
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of<v;rtue and operation, may alfo bee called et email 'vermes : the Earth 
may be called etemallpatience-, the Moone,an eternaU borrower and beeper; 
and Man of all other the mofl miferable , eternally mortall. And yohat Tr. re 
this, but to beleiue againe in the old Play of the gods I Tea in more #ods by 
Millions , than euer Hefiodus dreampt of. Butinfleedofthd madfoUie, 
wee fee it yteO enough with our feeble and mortaU eyes : and the eyes of our 
re a f on defceme it better ; That the Sunne, Moone, Starves, and the Earth, 
are limited, bounded, and conftraimd : thetnf elites they haue not conjlrai- 
ned, nor cou'd. Omne detetminarumcaufamhabetaliauam errici- 
cntem,quxilluddercrminauerit, Euery thing bounded hath fomc 
efficient cauie, by which it is bounded. 

Noivfor Nature ; As by the ambiguity of this name, thefcboole of 
SAriitotte hath both commended many errours njnto Ds , and fought alfo 
^th reby to obfcure the glory of the high Moderator of all things, finning in 
t>:eCreation,andinthegouemingoftbeWorld:Joifthe btfl definition bee 
taken out ofthefecondofKx\^.ox\ts^h\{\ck^,or primodc Cselo, or out 
of the fifth of his Metaphyficksj I fay that the bcft is but n mi»aH,and fep . 
uing onely to difference the beginning of Natural! motion , from Artificial! : 
•which yet the Academicks open better, ythen they call it A Seminary 
ftrength, infufed into matter by the Soule of the V\ ord : who g'me 
the firfl place to Prquidence , thefecondto Fate, and but the third to Na- 
ture. Viou\dcnt^byj^bJ£bjheyjvnder(land GOD) dux & < apur j 
Fa: urn, medium ex prouidentia prodiens ; Naaira poikemum. But 
bee it sob at hee -will, or bee it any ofthefe (GOD excepted jor participating 
of all: yet that it hack choice or rvnderilrnding( both "Which are neceffarily 
in the caufe of all things) no man hash aroowed. For this is rvnanfrperabls 
q/Xa&antius:Is autemfacit aliqmd, qui aut voluntatem faciendum 
habet,aut fcientiam ; Hee onely can bee faid to bee the doer of a 
thing, that hach either willor knowledge in the doing it. 

But the will andfeience of Nature , are inthefe -words tritely expreflby 
Ficinus ■ Foteft vbiqueNatura,veIperdiuerfamedia,veiexdiui;rl'iS 
materijs, diuerfa facere : fublat a vero mediorum materiarumque di- 
ucrfitate,velvnicum vel fimilimum operatur, neque poteft quan- 
doadeft materia nonoperari; ltisthepower ofNatureby diuerfity 
cf meanes,or*Ait of diuerfity of matter,to produce diners things:but 
taking away the diuerfity of meanes, and the diuerfity of matter ,it 
then workes but one or the like workej neither can it but wori- e, 
matter beeing prefent. Nob> z/Nature made choyce of diuerfity of 
matter , to -works all thefe ^variable "Workes ofHeauen and Earth j it, 
hadthen both vnderftanding and will ; it had counfnlc to beginner j 
feafonto difpofe ; rvertue and knowledge to fimfb ; and power to gouerne : 
without which , all things had beene but one and thefamc-* : all of the 

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matter of Heduen ; or all of the matter of Earth . And if we grant Nature 
ua ; itlr * phts'Will, andthis "Vndcrftanding, this counfaile, reafon, andpo-wer : Cur 
^gimxa^ot'ms,quiDciisriom'mctmWl^fhMwethencallfuchacauft 
ratherNature, than God ? God,of-whom all men haue notion, andgiue the-. 
irfrj/j, (. i Jtfirfl and hi gkc ft place to Diuine power : O mnes homines notio ngmjieQ- 
'"'' 5 ' ' rum habent, omnefq; fummum locum diui nocuidaro numini afl>% -* 
nant. A ndthis 1,'ayinfiortitbatitis a tru~Z> ejfeft of true reaforTin man 
'(■were there* no authority more binding than reafon) to acknowledge and 
adore'tbe firSh and 'moftfublime power. VeraPhilofop hia^ert afcenfus ab 
his quae rluunt, & onuntur, & occidunt, a'd eaqux vere funt, &• tem- 
per eadem : True Philofophy, is an afcendwgfrom the things -which flow, 
md rife-, and fall-, to the things that are for euer the fame. 
. ^ l^ For the reft ;T do alfo account it not the meaneft,but an impiety monftrous, 

to confoundGod and Nature : be it but in tearmes. For it is God, that only 
difpofeth of all things according to his ovene "will j andmaketh of one Earth, 
Vcflels o/nonor and dishonor. It is Nature that can difpofe ofnothing y 
but according to the -Will of the matter wherein it "Worketh. ItUGod,that 
commandeth all : It is Nature that is obedient to all. It is God that doth good 
rvnto all, knowing and lotting the good he doth : It is Nature, thatfeconda- 
rily doth alfo good, but it neither knowetb nor lotieth the goodit doth. It is 
God, that hath all things in himfeife ; Nature, nothing in itfelfe . It is 
God,"which is the Fatherland hath begotten all things : It is Nature, -which 
is begotten by all thinges ; in which it liueth and laboureth ifor by itfelfe it 
txifteth not. Forftjall we fay, that it is out ofaffeclion to the earth, that bea- 
ny things fall towards it \ Shall -we callit Reafon, -which doth condutl euery 
Riuer into the fait Sea \ Shall yoe tear me it knowledge in fire, that makes it to 
confume combuftible matter \lf it be Affeftion, Reafon, and Knowledge in 
thefe : by the fame Affeclion,Rvfon, and knowledge it is, that Nature-work- 
eth. Andthsrfore feeing all things work as they do, (callit by form, by Na- 
ture, or by ■wbatyoupleafe)yet becaufe they "W^rk by an impidfionjwhich they 
cannot refft ; or by a f. acuity, infufed by the fupr erne ft power : -we are neither 
to"Wonderat,norto-worfbip, the faculty that -worketh, nor the Creature 
wherein it worketh. But herein lies the -wonder. & to him is the -worfiip due, 
who bath created fuch a Nature in things, fcffuch a faculty^* neither know- 
ing itfelfe, the matter -wherein it worketh, nor the 7>ertue*jmd power -which 

ithath',dothyefworkallthingstotheirlaftand<vttermoftperfe£lion.And 
therefore euery reafonable manjakingto himfeife for agroundtbat "Wbichis 
granted by all Antiquity, and by al men truly learned that euer the world had; 
to-wit; Thatthere isapowerinfinit,andeternall,(-whicha!fonecefiity doth 
proue rvnto ™, without the belpe of Faith ; and Reafon, -without the force 
of Author iti e) ah things doe as eafily follow -which haue beene deliuered by 
diuine letters, as the -waters of arunning Riuer doe fucceftmelypurfue each 
other fromthe fit ft fountaines. j-fa 



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This much I fay it is , that Reafon itfelfe hath taught >-ys : and this ; 
the beginning of knowledge , Sa pientia pracedit, Religio feguitur : guiap"»»* 
priuseft Deum fcire, confequens colere; Safiencegoes before, lieUpion 
followes : beeaufe it isfirfl to know God,and then to worfhip him. This Sapi- 
pience Plato calleth, abfoluti boni fcicntiam, Thefcience of the abfohte 
good: and another yitientiam rerum primarum/empiternarurr>,perpe- 7 ^ ri '''' ;/6, 
tuarum. For Fait h f faith Ifi dote )is not extorted by Violence j but by rea~ 
fonan^exampleyperf^adfd^ fides nequaquam vi extorquetur j CeSta^ 
tione &ex?mvhs!iaadetur.Iconfeffeit,Tbat to inquire further, as of the 
effenceofGod, ofhispower,ofhisArt, and by whatmeaneHe createdths 
world: Or ofhisfecret judgment, and the caufes ; is not an effeft of Reafon : 
Sed cum ratione inhniunt, but tb"y grow mad with reafon, that inquire 
after it. For as it is nofhamenor difhonor(Jaitba French Author) de fail e~ 
arreft au but qu'on nafceu furpalTer, For a man to reft himfelfe-. there, 
where hefindsitimpofiibletopaffe on farther :fowhatfoemr is beyond, and 
out of the reach of true reafon, It acknowledged it to befo ; as <vnderftan- 
ding itfelfe not to be infinite, but according to the Name and Nature it hath , ®&i ' ' a '*• 
to be aTeacher, that beftknowes the end of his own Art. For feeing both Rea-fa^mw 
fin and Necefity teach ys(Reafon,wbicb is pars diuini fpiritus in corpus S* « 7, 
humanii merC\)thattbeworldwas made by apower infinite • and yet how^T' 
it was made, it cannot teach rvs : and feeing the fame Reafon and Necefjty f ^" 
make ys know, that the fame infinit power is euery wher in the world; and yet 
how euery where, it canot informe <~js :our beleefe hereof is not weakned, but 
greatly ftrengthned, by our ignorance ; beeaufe it is the. fame Reafon that tels 
<vs, That fuch a Nature cannot be f aid to be God, that can be in all concerned 
by man. 

Ihaue beenes already euerlong,to make any large difcourfe either of the 
parts of the following Story, or in mine owne excufe : ejpecially in the excufe 
of this or that pa f] age j feeing the -whole is exceeding weake and defeft iue^. 
Among thegrofeft, the -vnjittable diuifion of the bookes , I could not know 
bow to excufefud I not been djrebledto inlarge the building after the foun- 
dation yeas laid, and the firftpartfiniftjed. All men know that there is no 
great Art in the deuiding euenly ofthofe things, which arefubiecl to number 
andmeafure. For the reft, itfutes Well enough with a great many Bookes of 
this age,whichfpeaketomuch,andyetfay little ;Ipfi nobis furto fuKdu-. 
cimur, We areflollen away from our f elites fetting a highprice on all that- 
isouf ovme. Bit t hereof, though a late goodWriter, make complaint. yetfhaR 
it not lay hold on me, beeaufe I beleeue as be doth ; that who Jo thinkes him- 
felfethe wife ft man , is but a poorer and miferable ignorant. Thofe that are 
the ajftnen of war, again ft all the •vanities and fooleries of the Wotld, doe 
alvaies keepe the ftrongeU guards againUthemfelues, to defend them from 
tbemfeluestfromfelfe loue,felfe estimation, andfelfe opinion. 

E } Generally 



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Generally concerning the order of the -worke , J haue onely taken counfaile 
from the Argument*, For of theMfytians, -which after the do-wnef all of 
Babel take >vp the firfl part ,and "Were the fir ft great Kings of theWorld^ 
there came little to the roierw ofpoflerity ■ jo me few enter prifes , greater in 
famethan faith , q/"Ninu s and Semiramis excepted. 

Itwasthefiory of the Hebrewes, of all before the Olympiads,?^ 
oner came the con fuming difeafe of time; and prejerued it je'.fe, from the ' \ 
njery crad'e and beginning to this day : andyet not jo entire, but that the 
large dijeourfes thereof ( to which in many Scriptures "Wre are referred ) 
areno -where found. The Fragments of other Stories, "With the actions of 
thoje Kings and Princes srhich/hot sphere and there in the fame time, I 
am drtuen to relate by -wayofdigrefion : of -which -wemayfay with Virgil. 

A pparenr rari nantes in gurgite vafto ; 
They appearehereandthereflotinginthegreatgulfeof time. ^ 

To the fame fir ft Ages do belong the report of many Jnuentions there'n 
found, and frem'themderiued to <-js>, though moll of the Authors Namts , 
haue periled info long a Nauigation. For thoje Ages had their Laypes j 
they had diuerfity of Gouernment ; they had Kingly rule-' ; N^biliti^ • 
Pollicie in~warre j Nauigation; and all, or the mo{t of needful! Trades. To 
fpeake therefore of thefe^feeinginagenerallEijlorie -wefhould haue left a 
great deale of Nakedneffe, by their omif ion) it cannot properly bee called a 
dign fs'ion. True it is that I haue aljo made many others : -which if they 
Jball be lay d to my charge , I mttftcaft the fault into the great heape of hu- 
r'f-xfi r** rhr rfjr? ffffrnane error. For feeing -weedigrefje in all the -way es of our Hues eyeafee- 
ing the life of man is nothing elfe but digrefiion ; I may the better bee excu- 
Jed, in-wnting their Hues and actions. I am not altogether ignorant in the 
La-wes ofHiftorie,vnd of the Kindes. 

The fame hath beene taught by many ; but by no man better, and -with 
greater breuity, than by that excellent learnedGentlemanSk Francis Ba- 
con. Chriftian Lawes are alfo taught <vs by the Prophets and dpofiles; ■ 
mdeuery day preach ^vnto <vs. But weeftiO make large digreft. ons : yea 
the teachrsthemfeluesdonot [in all) keepe the path -which theypoynt out 
to others. 

For the reft; after fuch time as thePerbans had -wrefted the Empire 
from the Chaldxans , andhadraifedagreat Monarcbie^,producing Acti- 
ons of more importance th answer e elf e-where to be found: it "Was agreeable 
to the Order of Story , to attend this Empire -{while ftitjofiorftoed, that 
the affaires of the nations adioyning had reference there-ainto . The ike 
obferuance-was to bee rvfed to-war ds the fortunes of Greece, -when theya- 
gaine began to get ground ypon the Perfians,^ alfo towards the affaires of 

Rome 



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Rome, when the Romans grew more mighty than the Grcekes. 

As for the Medes,?/;* Macedonians,?/*? Sicilians,^ Carthaginians? 
and other N ation s ,w ho refifted the beginnings of the former Empires ; and 
afterwards became but parts of their compofition and enlargement : itfeemed 
befi to remember what was knowne of them from therfeuerall beginnings, 
infuch times and places, as they in their flour ifhing e fates oppofed thofe 
Monarchies 3 which in the end/wallowed them njp. And herein I boue follo- 
wed the beft Geographers: who feldome giUe names to thofe fmall brookes, 
whereof many ,ioyned together , make great Riuers j till fuch time as they 
become united, and runne in a maine flreame to the Ccran Sea. If the 
Phrafe be weake , and the Stile not eucry -where like itfelfe : the fir fl, (hewes 
their ■ legitimation and 'true Parent; the fecond, will excttfe itfelfe mpontbe 
Variety of Matter. FerVirgilI,^c?-a'a^/;«-Eclogues,graciliaL:ena, 
njhd f ranger pipeswhen he founded the wanes of Aeneas, Itmayalfo 
bedayd to my charge that I afe diuers Hebrew words inmyfirU booke, 
mdelle where: in which language others may think, end Imy-felfe achncw- 
/></£_, that 1 am altogether ignorant : but it is true, that fome of 'them I 
finddn Monranu s; others in lattaineCatefter in S. Senenfis, andofthe 
reft I h. me borrowed the interpretation of fome of my learned friends* But 
fay I had beene beholding to neither , yet were it not to bee Wondredat ho- 
ning had a eleuenyeares leafure,to attaine the knowledge of that, or of any <?~ 1 , 
thery tongue, how-fo-euer, I know that it Will bee faid by many, That I might 
haue beene more pleafngto the Reader, if I had written the Story of mine •> 
cwnetimesi hauing beene permitted to draw water -as ne arethe WeU-beact \ 6 ' 
as another. Tothfs Ianfwere,tbatwbofoeuerinwritingamoderneHif lf 
<, torie , fhaU follow truth too neare the heeles , it may happily fir ike out his 
[teeth. Thercisno Mittreffe or 'Guide, that hath led her followers artdfer- 
uants into greater miferies. He that goes after her too fane off, loofeth 
her fight, and loofeth him-felfe : andheethatwalkesafterheratamidledif 
tame 3 I how not whether MIjouldcalltbatkindofcourfeTemperorBafe- 
neffe. It is true , that Ineuer trauailed after mens opinions , when I might 
haue made the beftrpfe of them : and I haue now too few daiesremayning,to 
imitate thofe , that either out ofextreame ambition , or extreame cowardife y 
or both,doeyet,(when death hath them on his ffjoulders) flatter the world,be- 
tweenethe bedandthegraue. It is enough for me{beinginthatftate lam) to 
write of the eldefi times: wherein alfo why may it not befaid,thattnfpeaking 
ofthepafl, I point at theprefent, andtaxe the wices of thofe that are yet ly- ,-y 
aing , in their per fons that are longfmce dead ; and haue it laid to my charge. 
But this I cannot helpe, though innocent. Andcertainely if there be any, that 
fndmgthemfelues [potted like the Tigers of old time, fhaUfinde fault with 
me for painting them ouer a new ; theyjhall therein accufe themfelues iuftly, 
andmefalfly. 

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For IproteftbeforetheMaieflyof GOD, That I malice no manrvn- 
der the Stmne^. Impofible I know it is topleafe all : feeing few or none are 
fopleafed-with themjeluesfirfo aJfuredoftbemfelues s by reafonof their fub- 
W4- iehionto their private pafions-; but that thiyfeeme diuerfeperfons in one 
andthefame day. Seneca bath [aid it^andfo doe I : Vnus mihi pro po- 
pulo erat : and to the fame effect Epicurus 7 Hoc ego non multis fed 
tibi { or (as it hath f nee lamentably fatten out ) I may borrow the refolution 
of an ancient Philofopher , Satis eft vnus , Satis eft nullus. For it -Was 
forthefefuiceofthatmeJlimablePrinceHeniy-ttbefiiCcefiiuehope^andone 
efthegreateJloftbeChnfiianlVorld, that I<vndertookethtsWorke. It 
f leafed him toperyfe fome part thereof , andtopardon-what "Was amijfe~>. 
It is now left to the "world -without a Maifter.from -which all that is prefen- 
ted-,hathreceiuedbo:b blows iy^4«^Eademprobamus,eademrepre- 
hendimus/hicexituseftomnisiudicijjinquolislecundumpluresda- 
tur. But thefe difcourfes are idlt*. Iknow that -as the charitable "Witt iudge 
■ -charitably : fo againjl tbofe y qui glori antur in malitia , myprefent adtter- 
fitiebatbdifarmedmee . lam on the ground already ; and therefore haue 
{■«u C?~ **■' tf^-'not fane to fall; andforryfingagaine , as inthe Naturall priuation their 
is no recefion to habits ; fois it feldomefeene in the priuation politi~ 
que. I doe therefore for-beare 'to 'file my Readers Gentle, Courteous, 
*i«iFriendly , thereby to beg their gdod opinions, or to promife afecond and 
iti* thirdrvolumtJc»bich Ialfo intend ) if thefirfl recejuef race and goodac - 
. ceptance. For that -which is already djne, may bethought enough', and 
too much: and it iscertaine, Jet ^vs claw the Reader -withneuerfo many 
courteous phrafesi yet [halite euer-more be thought fooles> that "Write foo- 
tifhly. Forconclufon.; all the hope I haue lies in this , That I haue already 
fowadmore ^ngentleand'vncurteous Readers of my houeto"Wards them, ■ 
emd-wett-deferuingofibem, thaneuerlfljaSddeagaine. Forbaditbeene 
otberwife, I fhoi dd hard ly haue had this kifure , to haue mad e my (e lf e a 
fq&kmprm$, — 



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THE CONTENTS OF. THE 

CHAPTERS, PARAGRAPHES, 

AND SECTIONS, OF THE FIRST 

BOOKE OF THE FIRST PART OF 

THE HIST OKIE OF THE 

World. 



ttf 



C H A P T £ R. i. 

Of the Creation , and T referuation of the Worldl 




t^^d&ffsj theinuifble God is feet) in 
bit Creatures, 
b. II. 
That the wifefi of the Hea- 
then , whofe authorttie is not 
to be JMtfed, baue acknowledged the World 
to baue beene created by God. 
$. III. 
of the meaning of In pvmdpio, Gen i.j. 

$. IIII. 
Of the meaning of the wards [Heatien amd 
Earth,] Gen.i.i. 

i v. 

That the fubfisnee of the Waters, as mixt 
in the bo die of the Earth, is by Mofes ■vnder- 
Jioodw the word [ Earth : ] and that tht_j 
Earth, by the Attributes of informed and 
Vo:d,is defcribedai the Chaos of the ancient 
Heathen. 

\. VI. 

How it is to be vnder flood, that the Spi- 
rit of God moucd vpon the waters : and 
that this is not to befemhed curioufly. 
{. VII. 

Of the Light created,,*; the material! fub- 
flance of the Sunne : and of the nature of it, 
and&fficultie oj knowledge of it : and of "the 
excellence and -M o? tt : frj. of ntotion % and 
heat annexed vnto it. 



f VIII. 

Of the Firmament, e.n.d of the Waters aboue 
the Firmament : and whether there bee any 
criftaUme Hcauen , or any Primum Mo- 
bile. 

\. IX. 

k_A conclufen,refeating thefumme of the 
workesmthe Creation , which arereducedto 
three heads : The creation of matter \ The for- 
ming of it ; Thefimfhmg of 'it. 

f «. 

That "Nature is no Principium per Ce-,nor 
Forme, the giuer of being : and of our igno- 
rance, how fecond caufisfhould baue any pro- 
portion with their ejfils. 
f XI. 
■Of Fate-, and that the Starres baue great 
influenct^j : and that their operations may di- 
uerfy be Presented er furthered. 
$. XII. 
Of PrjfcienctL-J. 

$. XIII. 
Of ProuidenciLj. 

\. XI III. 
Of Prtdeflmation. 

d. XV. 
of Fortune : and of the reafon of fenac_j 
things that Jeemetobe by Fortunes , anda- 
gainfl Reafon and Promd e nct^>. 

a CHAP. 



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*. I. 

OF the Image of God, according t« 
.vhtch Man wasfirft created. 

$. II. " 
0/7A* intelletfuaU minde of Man , «* 
jyfctA ^<r>? « /»«f£ <>/7/^ /#fcigv ^ God:' 
and that this Image is much deformed by 
fmnc^i. 

$. III. 

• 

Of our bafe andfitile bodies : and that the 
tare thereof fhtuld yeeld to the immortal! 
Souie_j. 




y 



The Contents 



CHAP. II. 



Of Mans eftate in bisfirfi creation : andofCjods reft. 



$. nil. 

of the Spirit of life which God breathed 
into LMan in his creation. 

*.v. . 

That Man is (as it were) a little World: 
■with a digrefion touching our mortaUtie. 
{. VI. 
Of the free power , which Man had in hit 
fir ft creation to dijpofe efhimfelft_j . 
$. VII. 
Of Gods ceafmg to create any more : and of 
the caufe thereof, becanfe the Vniuerfall crea- 
ted was exceeding good. 



CHAP. III. 

Of the place ofTaradi/c^. 



$. I. 

THat thefeateof Paradife is greatly 
qtijlaken : and that it is no mer utile 
that men fbodderre_j. 
> II. 
isfrecitaHofjtrange opinions touching 
Paradife. 

$. III. 
That there was a true loctll Paradife, Eail- 
ward,in the Countrie of Eden. 

f mi. 

Why it fhouU bee needful! to intreat dili- 
gently of the place of Paradife. 
$. V. 

That the Floud hath not vttcrly defaced 
the markes of Paradife, nor caufe d hills in the 
Earth. 

\. VI. 
Th it Paradife was not the whole Earth, as 
feme hauc thought , making the Ocean to bee 
the fountaine of thofe foure Miners. 
f,- V I.I. 
Of their opinion which make Paradife as 
high as the Moone : andofothtrs which make 
it higher then the middle Region of the aire. 

$. vi I r. 

Of their opimonthatfeat Paradife vnier 
the „€ quint tfiull: and of the plea/ant habi- 
tation "under thofe Climates. 



$. IX. 

Of the change of the names of places : and 
that befidesthat Eden in Cazkfyria,there is 
a Countrie in Babylon, once of this name,as 
isprouedoutofEfay 37.4WEzech.27. 

$. X. 

Ofdiuers other teftimonies of the Land of 
Eden .• and that this is the Eden «f Paradife. 

$. XL 

Ofthedifficultie in the Text, which fee- 
met h to make the foure Riuers to rife from one 
ftreame^j, 

$. XII. 
Oftheftrangefertilitieandhappineffeof 
the Babylonian foile , as it is cert tint that E- 
denwas fuch. 

$. XIII. 
Of the Riuer Pifon, and the Land of Har 
uilah. 

k- XIIII. 
Of the" Riuer Gchon, &the Land of Cufh: 
and oftheill tranflatwg of Ethiopia for 
Culk 2.Chron.2r.i<?. 

$. XV. 

A conclnfion, by way of repetition fffomu 
things Jfoken of before. 

CHAP. 



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>it!)imti«fpkts:ml 
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in, mk »f tfc ww,« 
57.1iwEzccb.27, 

X 

xi. 



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of the Bril Booice. 



chap. 1 1 1 1. 
Of the tvpo chiefe Trees in the Garden ofTaradife^. 



$. 1. 

THi/ the Tree of Life was a materia/J 
Tree : arid in what fen fe it is to ks ta- 
ken., that Man by bis earing the for- 
bidden fruit, is made fub:°il to death. 
$. II. 
Of "Becanus his opinion , that the Tree of 
Knowledge was Ficus Indica. 



$. III. 

O/Becanus his not vnwittie allegorizing 
ofthefiarieefhisVkus Indica. 

$. IIII. i 
Of the name of the Tree of Knowledge of 
good and euil : with feme other notes touching 
the ftorie of 'Adams Jinne. 



CHAP. Vr 

Ofdiuers memorable things heWeene thefallofAdam, 
and the /loud of Noah. 



*. I- 

OF the eaufe , and the reuenge of 
Cains finne : and of his going out 
from God. 

\- II. 
of Cains dwellmgin the Land of Nod : 
undo/ his Citie Enoch. 

$. I IT- 

ofMofes his omittingfundrie things con- 
cerning Cains generation. 
$. IIII. 

/ 'the diuet flies in the <^iges of the Pa- 
triarchs, when they begat their children. 



$• v. 

. Of the long Hues of the Patriarchs : and 
fome of late memorie. 

■ $■ vi. 

Of the Patriarchs dcliuermg their know- 
ledge by Tradition : and thai Enoch writ he- 
fore thefloud. 

k- v 1 i. 

of 'the men ojrenowne before the floud. 
\. VIII. 

That the Giants, by Mofesfo called , were 
indeede men of huge bodies -.as alfo diners in 
latter times. 



CHAP. VI. 

Offdolatrovj corruptions, cjuickfy rifing^ and hardly at length 
yani/hing in the "world : and of the J^eliques of "Truth 
touching thefe ancient times^ ohfcurely appearing 
in Tables and eld Levends* 

d 

$1; IIII. 



$■ I- 

r— ^— \ Hat in eld corruptions we may finde 
M fomefgnes of more ancient truth. 
-*• ' $. II. 

That the corruptions themf elites were very 

ancient : as in the-pamilie of Noah , and in 

the old JEsy\pthns. 

$■ llh 

That in proceffe of time thefe leffer errors 

drew on greater , as appeareth in the groffe 
fuperjlitions of the ./Egyptians. , 



Thiatfrom the Reliqucs of ancient Records 
amongthe Egyptians and others, the first 
I do Us and Babies were inuented :and that the 
first IupicerW/w Cain; Vulcan, Tubal- 
eain,&c. 

\. V. 

Of the three chiefefi Iupitcrs ; and the 
frange fiorie of the third. 

a a \. VI. 






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$. VI. 

O/Cham, 4W other wickedones , where- 
of fame gat , feme affecled the name of 
Gods. 

f VII. 
That the wifer of the ancient Heathen had 
fxrre better opinions of Gad. 




The Contents 



\. VIII. 

That Hekthenifme and Iudaiffaejifter ma- 
ny wounds, were at length about the fame time 
■under Iulian miraculoufly confounded. 
f IX. 

Of the lafi refuges of the Deuill to main- 
tainebis Kingdoms. 



\. I. 

OF Gods forewarning: and fome hu- 
mane tefi 'monies :& feme doubting 
touching the truth of Noahs floud. 
f II. 
Of the floud in the time of Ogyees : and 
that this was-not Noahs floud. 
$. III. 
ofDeucaiionsJloud.and that this was not 
Noahs floud : nor the Vmbri in Italie a 
remnant of any vniuerfall floud. 
$. 1 1 II. 
Of fome other records teflifym^thevni- 
uerfill floud : and of two ancient deluges in 
*^%V^t:andoffomeelfewhere. 
$.' V. 
That the floud of Noah was fupernaturall, 
though fome Jay it might banc beeneforefeene 
by the Starr es. 

\- VI. 

That there was no neede of any new Creati- 
on of matter to make the vnmerfali floud: and 
TpftZJttre Cataf adi C<3eH, GeE *V.TT " 
$ VII. 
Of fome remainder of the memorie of 
Noah among the Heathen. 
\. VIII. 
Of fnndrie particulars touching the A At: 
m the place whe ; re it teas made ; the matter } 



Inon-, and name. 



$. IX. 

That the Arke was offufficient capacitie. 
■ $. X. ' 

7*4? the Arke «/??</ -upon part of the Hill 
Taurus (VCaucafus) betwecne the EaH 
Indies4/M?Scychia. 

t- I. 

A Pretention of fome queftions leffema- 
*» to«//: jw/A a note of thevfe of this 
queftionjofindoutthe Metropolis of nations. 
\. II. 
K^fpropafall of the common opinion, that 
the Arke refted vpon fome of the Hills of Ar- 
menia. 



CHAP. VII. 

oahs Floud. 

t. in. 

The' fir ft Argument againft the common o- 
pinion. They that came to bmldBabel,would 
haue come fooner , had they come from fe neare 

a place as. Armenia. . 

t. mi. 

Thifecond Argument; That the Eaflerne 
people were more ancient, in populofitie, and in 
all humane glories. 

t- v. 

The third Argument $ From the wonder- 
full refiflancewhich Semiramh found in the 
Eafi Indies. 

i VI. 

The fourth Argument ; From diuers con- 
federations in theperfon of Noah. 

f. VII. 

Of the fenfeleffe opinion of Annius the^> 
Commenter vpon Bcrofus, that the Arke re- 
fledvpon Montes Cafpij in Armenia ; and 
yetvpon Gordiafi, which are three hundred 
miles diflant alfb in Armenia , and yet in 
Scythia. 

t. VIII. 

The fift Argument ; The Vine muflgrow 
naturally neare the place where the Arke 
refled. 

t. IX. 

<^Anfwere to an obieffion put of the words 
of the Text. The Lord fcattered them 
from thence vpon the face of the whole 
earth. 

K^in anfwere to the obieffion from, the 
name of Ararat, taken for Armenia : and the 
height of the Hills there. ' 

t- XL. 

OfCmc^\ii,anddiuersfarrehigher Hills 
than the Armenian, 



t- XII. . 
Of diuers incongruities, if in thisflorie we 
Should take Aram for Armenia. 

f. XIII. 



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of the firft Booke. 



t. XIII. 

o/>»* contrarie fit nation of ^Armenia to 
the place noted in the Text : and that it is no 
merntule, that the fame [edge of hills running 
from Armenia to India fhould keepe the fame 
name all a- long, and euen in India, bee called 
Ararat. 



\. XIIII. 

of the bell Vine naturally growing on the 
South- fide ofthemountamesCaucali, and to- 
ward the Eajl Indies .-and of other excellencies 
ofthefoile. j-. XV. 

The cOnclufion, with a briefe repeating of 
diners chief "e points. 



CHAP, VIII. 

Of the fir/I planting of Rations after thefloud: and of the 

Sonnes of N.oah • Sem, Ham, and Iaphet, by whom 

the Earth was replied. 



$. i. 

WHetherShem andHam were 
elder then Iaphet. 
f IT. 
Of diners things that in allreafon are to be 
frejumed, touching the fir ft -planting of "the 
World ; as that all Hi ft ones muji yceld to Mo- 
les : that the world was not plan ted all at once, 
nor ■aii bout great direction : and that thes 
knowne great Lords of the firft Jges , were 
of the iffueofHzm. 

$. III. 
Of the lies of the Gcntillsin Iaphets por- 
tion : of&tToi\ii his too {pee die J eating Go- 
mcr the Sonne of Iaphet /» Italic t and ano- 
ther of Iaphets Sonnes Tubal in Spainc: 
and of the Antiquitie of lenginque Naui- 
gution. 

$. mi- 

Of Gog and Magog.T ubal, W Mcfccb, 
feated firft about <^/ifia the lefife; out of E- 
zechicl, cap.38.39. 

* V. 
i^Againft the ft. buleusBerofus his fiction^ 
That the Italian Ianusw.w Noah. 
$. VI.- 
ThatGomcrdfo and his SonneT ogor- 
.ma , of the pofteritie of 'Iaphet , were firft 
feated about \^ifia the lefii-J : and that from 
thence they fpreadlVcftward into Europe^ ; 
and Northward into Sarmatia. 
$. VII. 
O/lauan the fourth Sonne of\a^hct-,and 
cflA<:kh,of Ay am,& Meftiech ^/'Iaphet. 
$. VIII. 
o/Afcanez and Ripbath, the two elder 
Sonnes of "Gorncr. 



$. IX. 

Ofthefoure Sonnes of hum ■ and of the 
double fignificxtion of Tharfis , either for * 
proper name, or for the Sea. 

fox. 

That the feat of Cbufll, thecldeft Sonne 
tf/Ham , was in Arabia, not in ^Ethiopia : 
and of ftrangc fables , arid ill tranfiations of 
Scripture , grounded ipen the mrftakingof 
this point. 

t- I. 

(f\F lofcphusfc- talc of an ty£thiopeffe_j 
wife to Mofes, grounded on the mifi as- 
king of the feat o/Chufh. 
t- II- 
A difpute againft the tale ofloCephus. 

t- III. 
Chufh ill expounded for tALthiepia, E- 
zech. 29.10. 1 

t. I I'll. 
Another place ^Ezeehic^cap. 30. v. 9. 
in like manner mijlaken. 
\. V. 
A place Efay 1 8. v.r. in like manner cor- 
rupted by taking Chufh for Ethiopia. 

i vi. ' 

That vpon the like mifaking , both Ter- 
bAa in the Stori'e of Schacbcrib, ahdXcra 
in the for ie ofACa, are vnadmfedlji madcj 
^/Ethiopians. 

\. VII. 
^A farther expofition of the places. 
Efay 1 8. 1. 

$. XI. 
of the plantation and Antiquities ofzAL- 

BJ*- 

a 3 t. I. 




The Contents 



t- I. 

THat Mizraim the chiefe planter ofJE- 
oypt,and the rejl of the fonne s-of Ham, 
were featedin order, one by another : 
t. II. 
Of the time, about which the name ofis£- 
gypt beganmeto beknowne : and of ' ihe tx£- 
gyptians Lunarie yeares , which made their 
antiquities feeme the morefabulom, 

\. III. 
i Of cert nine vaine offer t ions of the antiqui- 
tie of the /Egyptian:. 

t mi. 

K^fgainfi Pererius ; That it is not vnlike- 
ly, but that /Egypt was peopledwithintwo 
hundred jeares after the Creation ; at leaB 
that both it, andthemojl parts of the World, 
were peopled before the Floud. 
t- V. 
Of feme other reafons againfi the opinion 
^Pererius. 

t- VI. 
ofthe words of Motes, Gen. 10. v.vlt. 
whereupon Pereriusg roundedhis opinion. 
- t- VII. 
orf conclufion , refoluing of that which is 
mofl likely, touching the Egyptian antiqui- 
ties :withfomewhat of Phut , another fonne 
of Wi.m, which peopled Lybia. 
f XII. 
Of the eleuen fonne s of "Canaan,* A< 'fourth 
fonne of Wim. 

i i. 

OF the bounds of the Land of Canaan ; 
with the names of his eleuen fonnes. 
\. II. 
Of the portions of 2.idon WHeth. 

t- HI- 
Of the Iebufites, and A morites. 

f. IIII. 
of the Gcrgcfitcs,Hcuites,d" Harkitcs. 

t. V. 
o/Sini WAruadi. 



t. VI. 
Of Zemari. 

t. VII. 
o/"Hamathi. 

£. XIII. 
ofthefonnes of Chuib, exceptingNim- 
rod, of ahom hereafter. 

t- r. 

TT 'Hat the mofl of the fens ofChulh were 
*• featedin Arabia the happy : and of the 
Sabasans that robbed lob:and of the Queene 
that came to Salomon. 

t. II. 
Iofephus his opinion 0/Dedan, one of 
the iffue ofCh\}[h,to haue beene featedin the 
W?/? /Ethiopia, diffroued out o/Ezechiel 
«»ijfHieremie. 

£. XIIII. 
ofthe iffue of 'Mizraim -.and of the place 
o/Hiercmic, cap.p.v. 7. 

$. XV. 

Of 'the iffue of "Sem. 

t- I. 

OF Elam, AfTur, Arphaxad , and 
Lud. 

t- II. 
Ofhrum, and his Sonnes. 

t- III. 

ofthe diuifion ofthe Earth in the time of 
Phaleg, one ofthefonnes </Heber, efthcj 

iffue of Sera, 

t- IIII- 
Ofthefonnes of \odan,the other fonne of 
Hebcr. 

t- V. 
o/Ophir oneoflo&zmfonnes, andof 
Peru : andof that voyage o/Salomon. 
f. VI. 
Oftizmhhthe fonne of lo&an , whoalfb 
paffed into the Eaft Indies: andofMc(hz,*itd 
Sephcr, named in the bordering ofthe fami- 
lies of Ioftan : with a conclufion of this dif- 
courfe touching the plantation ofthe World. 



CHAP. IX. 

Of the beginning and ejlabHJhing of Gouemment. 



$. 1. 

OF the proceeding from the fir ft Go- 
uememdnt '•under the eldejl of Fa- • 
milies to Regally and from Rega/lab- 
foluteto Regalltemperedwitb Lawes. 



$. II. 

Ofthe three commendable forts of Go- 
uernement, with their oppof.tes : and ofthe 
degrees of humane focietie^j. 

\. III. 






T 



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VI. 
Vll. 

;. i. 



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Ml. 
XJHL 

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», Arphaxad , W 

II. 

.' Ams, 
. 111. 

f/ivEirtljifitWw/ 

JIB 

t- V ' jf 

VI u 



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of the firfl: Booke. 



Of the 
Kings. 



$. III. 

Gouernement of the fir ft 



£. IIII. 

Of the beginning of Kchlitie : and of the 
vainevaunt thereof without vertue. 't I 



CHAP. X. 

0/Nimrod, Belus, WNinus : and of memorable 
things about thofe times. 



$. i. 

THtt Nimrod was the fir ft after the 
P loud that raignei like Soueraigne 
Lord:andthat his beginning feemeth 
to hme beene of iufi author /tie. 
$. II. 
TWNimrod,Belus, WNinus, were 
three dtfi mil perfons. 

$. III. 
That Nimrod, not Aflur, built'Nmme : 
and that it is probable out efEizi aj. I i.that 
Attur built Vr of the Chaldces. 
$. IIII. 
Of the Atfs o/Nimrod and Bclus , as 
fitrre as now they are knowne. 



$■ v. 

That we are not to meruaile hew fo many 
Kingaomcs could be ere tied about thefe times: 
and of "Vexoris c/«x£gypc ; and Tanais 
of Scy thia. 

£. VI. 
<?/>/#■ 7^##f of Bclus , and other Names 
affine vnto it. 

$. VII. 

Oftheworflipping of 'images , begunne^j 
from Bclus /'» Babel. 

£. VIII. 

OftheWtrres c/Ninus : andUfilyofhis 
Wane again ft Zoroafter. 



CHAP. XI. 

OfZoroafter,fuppofedto bane beene the chief e Author of Ma- 
gicians : and of diners hjnds ofMagic\„ 



$. r. 

THat Zoroafter was not Chzm,nor 
the firfl Inuenter of^firologie, or of 
Magtcke: and that there were diners 
great ^Magicians of this name. 

$. II. 

Ofthe'Nkme */"Magia.- and thatitwas 
anciently farre diuers from Coniurmg and 

Witchcraft. 

$. III. 

That the goo?, knowledge in theaunctent 
Aiagicke is not io bet condemned; though the 
demllhere^as inotHer kinds, htth fought to 
obtrude euill things inder the name and co- 
lour of good things. 



.$ IIII. 

That Daniels mijltking Nabuchodono- 
lbrs condemning of the ^Magicians, doth not 
iuflifie all t heir praffifes. 
$. V. 

The abufe of things , which may bee found 
in all kinds , is not to condemne the right vfe 
efthem. 

f VI. 
Of the diuers kinds of -unlawfull Magtcke, 

$. VII. 
Of diuers waies by which the deuillfeemeth 
to worke his wonders. 

$. VIII. 
That none waseuer raifedfrom the dead 
by the power of the deuill: and that it was not 
the true Samuel which appeared to Saul. 

CHAP. 



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I 



The Contents 



$. i. 

OF the magnificent building ofNi- 
niue by Ninus : andof Babylon 
by Scmiramis. 

$. n. 

Of the end tf/'Ninus : and beginning of 
Semiramis ragne. 

$. III. 

O/Scmiramis Parentage, andeducation i 
and Mctamorphofis of. her Mother. 

£i iisi£ 5£at UsS Jfias . 




CHAP. XII. 

Oft be memorable buildings o/*Ninus : and of his wife-* 
Semiramis : and bf other heraih. 



f mi. 

of her Expedition into India , and death 
after difcomfiture .-with a note oft be improba- 
bilitie of her vices, 

■\. V. 

of the Temple of Belus , built by Se- 
miramis : and of the Pyramided of \y£- 

gyp c - 



mvh 






J he Contents of the Chapters, Paragraphes, and 

Sections ,, in the (ccond Booke of the firft 

Part of the Hiftoric of the 

W OtlD, 

CHAPTER I. 

Of the Time of the birth of A braham : and of the vfe of 

this qucjlion ? for the ordering oft he forte of the 

.A (Tynan Empire^, 



$. r. 

F feme oj the fucceffors ofSc- 
miramis ; with ahiefetranfi- 
tien to the queftion , about the 
Time of the birth of Abra- 
ham, 
$. II. 

i_yf prep fall of reifons or arguments, thtt 
are brought to proue Abraham was borne, 
inthe yeare zyz.after the f loud, and not in 
the year e 351, 

ft III. 

The tinfiyere to one of the obiecfionspro- 
pofed , jbewing that A bi aham made but one 
toumey out of Mefopotarriiaw/* Canaan 5 
and it, after hts'Faibers death. 

iwu . : \ $. mi. 

Thetnfwereto another of the objections 
propofed, /hewing that it was not vnltkcly, 
that TertUfhould beget Abraham in his 
hundred and thirtieth yeare. 



$.V. 
The arfvere to two mojre of the obiefiions, 
fhewtng that we may h.iue certamtie of A bra- 
ham's age from the Scriptitre,thougbwem"uke 
not Abraham the e'jejl fonne : andtfiat 
there was great caufe, why in theft orie of 
Abraham his two brethren ftjould'bee re. 
Jpetted. 

fe VI. 

That the naming of Abraham firft »fihe 
three Brethren, Gen. 1 i.v.z6doth not proue 
that hee was the eldeft ;' together with diuers 
reafons , prouing that Abraham was not the 
eldeft "fonne ofTexah. 

$ VII. 

>^i conclufion of this difpute, noting the 
Mthors on both fides: with an admonition, 
that they which fhor ten the times, make all an- 
cient for ies the more vnprobable. 

£. VIII. 



^ 









A; 



'■• 














°A&# 



ti 



tit.....!:',""' 



V. 







oftbifttf 
•it of tit 



V. 

;ttmtl ftkM»> 



ip 



VI. 



*#4* 






v 



of the firft Booke. 



f VIII. 

t^A computation of the times of the Afly- 
nansand others, grounded vpott the times 
notedin the /lone of Abraham. 

$. IX. 

That Amraphel , one of the foure Kings 
whom Abraham ouerehrew , Gen. 14. may 
probably be thought to haue beenelsmhs the 
fonne of 'Ninus. 

\. X. 

of. Arioch , another of the foure Kings : 
andthtti-lhs, whereof hee ufaidtohaut_j 
been: King, lies betweene Coelcfyria, and 
Arabia Perraa. 



$■ XL 

O/Tidal, another of the foure Kings. 
f XII. 

That Chcdorlaomcr, the chiefe of the 
foure Kings,WM»etof AiTyriu, but of 'Per. 
fia : and ihat the Aflyrian Empire at this 
time was much impaired 

. £• XIII. 

That it isnotvnprobable, that the foure 
Ktngs had no Dominion in the Countries na- 
med, but that they had elfewhere withtheir 
Colonies planted them fe'mcs, and fo retained 
the names of the Countries whence they came: 
which if it befo, weneeienot to fay that km- 
raphe] was Ninias , nor trouble tur felues 
with may other difficulties. 



CHAP. II. 

OftheKjngt ofMgjpt from the firfl peopling of it after 

the Floud, to the time ofthedeliuerieofthe 

ffraelites from thence^- 



I 

ABriefe of the Names and Timesof 
the first Kings of ^£gy pt : with a. 
note of the caufes of difficult te in re- 
Joluing ofthe truth in thefepotnts. 

$. II. 

That by the account oft he Egyptian Dy- 
naftics, & otherwife,it appeares that Chams 
raigne in tsSgypt begannewtheyearc after 
the F I oud 191. 

$. III. 

that thefe Dynafties were not diuersft ■ 
rnilies of Kings, but rather fuccef ions of Re- 
gents ; ofttimesmany vnder one King. 

$. 1111. 

o/Cham , and his fonne Mizraim , or 
Ofiris. 



j f V. 

Ofthe time when Ofiris raigne ended: and 
thatlacob came into t,/£gypt in the time of 
Orus, the feme ^/Ofiris. 
£. VI. 
0/Typhon, Hercules i/fgyptius, O- 
rus, and the two Sefoftres, fucce finely raig- 
nmg after Mizraim : and ef diners errorsa- 
bout the former S efo I tres . 
$. VII. 
Of 'Bufiris, the firfl oppreffor ofthe ifrae- 
lites : and of his fuccef or Queene Thermu- 
tis, thattooke vp Mofes out ofthewMer. 
\. VIII. 
Of the two bretheren of Queene Ther- 
mutis : and what King it Was , -vnderwhom 
Mofes was borne : and who it was thatperifh- 
edinthcRedSea. 



CHAP. in. 

Ofthe deliuerie of Jfrael out of &gypt, . 



o 



$. I. 

F the time of 'Moles birth.-andhow 
long the Ifraelitcs were oppreffed 
in /Egypt- 



$. II. 

ofdiuers Cities and Places in v£gy '^men- 
tioned in thiiflorie or elfewhere in the Scri- 
pture. 

$. III. 



$. III. 

of the crueltie againfl the Ifraelhcs yeng 
children in JEgy pt : and o/Mofes bis prefer* 
uation and education. 

$. mi. 

0/MoCc5 his flying out efALgypt-, and 
the opinions of cert nine ancient Hijiorians, of 
his iVarre in ^Ethiopia ; and of his mariage 
there : Philo his iudgement ofhisPaBorall 
life -.and that tf/*Percrius of the Bookes of 
Genefls,4WIob. 

f V. 

©/"Pharaohs purfuit df the Ifraelites : 
andof their paffage towards the Red Sea ,fo 
farre as Succoth. 




The Contents 



\. VI. 

of the Solar ie and Lunar ie yeares : and 
how they are reconciled. -with the forme of the 
Hebrew yeare, and their manner of interca- 
lation. 

f VII. 
Of the paffage oflfncl from Succoth to- 
wards the Red Set : and of the diuers wayes 
leading out oft/Egypt. 

$. VIII. 
of their paffage ouer the Rid Sea : and of 
the Red Sea it fife. 

$. IX. 
That the paffage through the Red Sea wot 
miraculous ; and not at alow Ebbe^j. 



CHAP. 1 1 1 1. 

Of the iournjing of the Kraditesfrom the %edSea> to the 
place where the Laiv was giuen them : "frith a. 
difcourfe of Lowes. 



ATranfition, by way of recapitulation 
of feme things touching Chronolo- 
gie : with a continuance oftheftorie, 
•vntillthe Amalekites met with the Ifrae- 
lites. 

$. II. 
. Of the Amalekites, Madianites, WKe- 
Tlitcs, vponoccafion of the battel! witbtht_j 
Amalekites , and Iethro's comming , who 
being a Kenitc, was Prieft of Madian. 
$. III. 
Of the time when the Law was giuen i with 
diuers commendations of the inuention of 
Lawes. 

* IIII. 
Of the name and meaning of the words, 
Law, and Right. 

$. V. 
Of the definition of Lawes, and of the Law 
eternal!. 

f VI.- 

Ofthe Law of Natures, 

k* VII. 
Of the written Law of God 

k- VIII. 
Of the vnwritten Law ofGod,giuen to the 
Patriarchs by Tradition. 



$. IX. 

OftheiMoraff, Judicial!, and Ceremonial! 
Law : with a 2{ote prefixed , How theScrip- 
ture fpeakctbnot alway in onefenfe , when it 
nameththe Law i^Mofcs. 
\. X. 
A propofall of nine ether points to be con- 
fideredt, withatouchofthefiuefirp. 
$. XI. 
Of the fix t point, to wit, of the difference 
and agreement of the Old and New Tejia. 
ment. 

f XII. 
Of the rest of the points propofed. 

K xiii. 

OftbefeucrallCommmdementsoftht_j 
Decalogue: and that the difficult isnotin 
re/pec! of the Commandements, but by our de- 
fault. 

$. XIIII. 
if there were not any Religion , nor Judge- 
ment tocome, yet ffo Decalogue were most 
necefiarie to be obferued. 

\. XV. 
Of humane Liw,written and vnwritten; 

I *' XVL 

That only the Prince is exempt from hu- 
mane Lawes, & in what fort. 

CHAP. 







•;«/" 



** 



H 






^H 







imi ^, 



<N 



***** 



««%, 



*» 



Dpi 

■ vin 

• IX. 



dhmk 



•Mb a 



.IX. 

'»iai,aiCtrmmtl 

:yij inmftrft ,jpfai( 
Mofcs. 

t&ifkfufif. 
I XI. 

. XII. 
ad 



5^" 



of the firft Booke. 



CHAP. V. 

The forte of the Uvaclitcsfrom the receiuing of the Law 
to the death of Alofes. 



f !. 

OHfe num bring and diffofing of the 
Ho ft <?/"Ifrael , /w - flfew- marches 
through the iVilderncffe ; »v//> a 
Note of the reiterence giuen to the worflnp of 
Godwin thu ordertngofthetr Troups. 
$. II. 
trff offerings of the twelue Princes : The 
Paffeouer ofthefecond ' yeare : J~hc debarring 
of Icthro. 

\ HI. 
7&rwM4jf/5w»Horeb/tfKadcs : the_j 
mutinies by the way : and the caufe of their 
turning back to the Red Sea. 

$. mi. 

of their vmvilhigneffe toreturne : with 
the punifhment thereof : and of diuers acci- 
dents in thereturne. 

0/ Motes arriuallatTL'm Kadcs : and the 
tec f dents while they abode there. 



$. VI. 

Of their compafing Iduma;a, and Kami- 
ling tt Anion the border of Moab. 

f VII. 

OftheBooke of thebattailes of the Lord, 
mentioned in thu Storie, and of other Bookes 
mentioned in Scripture, which arclofi. 

\. VIII. 

O/Mofcs £« ^w«7£ ffe ? jf„ f */Xot : 
and of the Giants m thofe farts : and ofSc- 
hon and Og. 

$. IX. 
Of the troubles about the Madianitcj, and 
of Mofcs his death. 

f X. 

Obferuations out of the ftorie of 'Mofcs, 
How God dtfpojetb both thefma/tefl occafions, 
and thegreateft refjlances, to the effecting of 
his purpofe. 



CHAP. VI. 

Oft he Rations with whom the Ifraelites had dealing after their 

comming out of /Egypt : and of the men ofrenowne in other 

Stations, about the times of Mofcs and Iofua : with 

thefmnmeofthe HiHorie of 

Iofua. 



$. I. 

HOW the Tuitions, with whom the 1C- 
raelitcs»wf/<i> hauewarre, were 
diuers waies (a,s it were) prepared 
to be their enemies. 

\. II. 
■_ Of the Kings of //^CanaanitesWMa- 
dianitcs , mentioned in the ancient warres of 
the Ifraelites. 

f III. | 

Of the Amalctatcs W Ifmaclites. 

$. mi. 

Of the inftaurttion of ciuilitie in Europe 
about theft times ; and <?/*Prometbeu5 and 
Adas. 



c 



of Deucalion and Phaeton. 

$. VI. 

o/Hcrmcs Trifmegiftus. 

$. VII. • 

^IaiinesWIambres, andfome other 
that lined about thofe times. 

£. VIII. 

A Brief of the Hi ftorie of Iofua : and of 
the fpacc betweene him and Othoniel : and 
of the remainders of the Canaanites : with a 
Note of feme Contemporaries to Iofua -.and 
efthe breach of Fat 

CHAP. 



>& 



ass „ 



'"& 



» r. 




*«!■ 



The Contents 



CHAP. VII. 

Of the Tribes oflfrael that were planted in the borders of 

Phoenicia : withfundriejlories depending ypon 

thofe daces \ 



d. I. 

THe Froeme to the defcription of the 
whole Land of Canaan ; with an 
expofttion of the name of Syria. 

f II. 

Of the hounds of the Land of Canaan; 
and of the promifes touching this Land. 

f III. 
■ TheTribe of Aftier. 

t- I- 

T He homds of the tribe of Aiher. 
f. II. 
O/Zidon. 

t- HI. 
Of Sarcpta : with a briefe hifsrie of 
Tyre in the fame Coafl. 

t. mi. 

ofPtolomais, or Aeon. 

t- V. 
Of the Cafrle of&. George. 

t VI. 
o/'Acziba, Sandalium,4»^tf/^«. 

t- VII. 
o/Thoron, Gifcala, and feme ether 
places. 

f. VIII. 
Of the Riuers and Mountaines of After. 

f mi. 

The Tribe of Nephtalim. 



t- I 

F the bounds of Nephtalim : and of 
Heliopolis,WAbi!a. 

t. II. 
OfHazor. 

t- III. 
©/"Csfarca Philippi. 

t, IIII. 
of Capernaum, and the Cities ofDecar- 
polis. 

f. V. 
0/Hamath. 

t- VI. 
0/Reblatha, and Rama, and diners 
ether Townes. 

f V. 
The Tribe tf/"Zabulon. 
b. VI. 
The Tribe of Iiachar. 

£. VII. 
The h'alfe of the Tribe of ManaflK 

t. I. 

r\T the bounds of this half e Tribe : and 
^-^ff/Scythopolis, Salem, Thcrla, and 
ethers. 

t. II. 
o/Gc/areaPalarftina:, and feme other 
Townes. 



CHAP. VIII. 

Of the Kjngdome of Phoenicia. 



$. I. 

THe bounds and chief e Cities , and 
Founders , and Name of this King- 
dome : and of the imtention of Let- 
ters a/cribed to them. 

$. II. 
of 'the Kings of Tyre. 



$. III. 

0/T3ozius his conceit , that f/kEdumse- 
zns,inhabiting along the Red Sea,were the_j 
Progenitors of the Tyrians ; and that thes 
Ty nans from them receiuedand brought in- 
to Phoenicia the knowledge ef the triie^j 
God. 



CHAP. 










T: 



^ 



4,n>/ 



(•//. 

• UI. 
ulipp/. 

nil 

t v. 

n. 

■ V. 
Mb. 

VI. 
har. 

VII. 
rrite«/Mana!fe. 

f. I. 

jlhUftltir.&i 
s, SaJan, TAcflS, ^ 

II. 

:tint, alfalfa 



c 0- 



of the firft Booke. 



CHAP. IX. 



Of the Tribe o/Ephraim : and of the KJngs of 

the Ten Tribes, yvbofe head was 

Ephraim. 



$. i. 

OF //*> memorable places in the Tribe 
of Ephraim. 
$. II. 



Icroboam to Achab. 
\. III. 

0/ Achab , Wfc Succcffors : withthi^ 
Captiuitie of the Ten Tribes. 



CHAP. X. 



Ofthe memorable places of Dan, Simeon, Iuda, 

Ruben, Gad, and the other halfe of 

Manafle. 



$. I. 

OF Dan : where 0/Ioppe , Gath, 
Accaron , Azotus , and other 
Townes. 

$. II. 
The Tribe of Simeon. 
f III. 
The Tribe of Iuda. 

$. mi. 

T/k 7>^ of Reuben , and his borde- 
rers. 

t- I- 

Tffefeats and hounds of Midun, Moab, 
WAmmon ; />«r/ whereof the Rcu- 
bmltcs wanne from Sehon -S'w,? «/Hef- 

bon. 

f. II. 

Of/fe memorable places of the Reube- 
nites. 



i in. 

Of diners places bordering Reuben < be- 
longing to Midian, Moab, or Edom. 

t. mi. 

Of the Dead Sea. 

t- v. 

Of the King; u/Moab; much ofwhofe 
Ceuntriemthm Arnon Reuben poffefi. 

\.V. 

of the memorable places of the Gadites, 
and the bordering places u/Ammon. 

f VI.- 

Of the Ammonites; part. ofwhofe Ter- 
ritories the Gadites wanne from Og, the^f 
K/^tf/Baftn. 

- f VII. 

0/}/xr #£«" /S^6 o/Manaflc. 



CHAP. 



-£*> 



&6£ 

£££ 




gi£g 


I 


3SS 


' 


00™ 
528 


« 


piu 

sis 

S S £ 
3S3 


1 
■1 

! 



ft^ 



, *. I. 

F the Cttie */"Damafcus , and the 
' diuers fortunes thereof. 

\. II. 

Ofthefirfi Kings ^/Damafcus, and of 
the growing vp oft heir power. 




a»«r 



The Contents 



CHAP. XI. 



The Hislorie of the Syrians, the chief e borderers of 
the IfraeJftes, that dwelt on the Easl 
of lor dan. 



| i- m 

Of the latter Kings, and decay andouer- 
throw of their power. 

$» uii. 

Ofotherlefer Kingdoms of the Syrians 
which being brought vnder the Aflyrians' 
J neuer recovered tbemfelues agoine_j. 



CHAP. XII. 

Of the Tribe o/"Beniamin 9 and of 
Ierufalem.- 



f diners memorable places in the^j 

Tribe «/Beniamin, where of Hie- 

ridio,GiIgal,Mitlpa, Bethel, 

Kama, Gobah, WGibha. 

£. II. 

Of diuers memorable things concerning 

Hierufalem. 

■ 



$• IJl 

Of the deftumon of Hierufalem by the 
Romans. 

0. IIII. 

of the vaine and malitious reports of 
Heachen Writers , touching the auncient 
Ievves. 



CHAP. XIII. 

Of the memorable things that happened in the World 
from the death o/Iofua to the Wane of Troy : 
which was about the time of 
Iephtha, 



Gethe Inter-regnum after Iofua's 
death :m d of Ol\xomc\. 
\. II. 
Of the memorable things tfthuAee mo- 
ther Rations : and of the difficult in the^ 
computation of Times. 

$■ III. 
o/Ehuds time; Wj/Proftrpina, 



I 



Admetus , and others that liued about thefe 
times. 

I in i. 

0/Debora, and her Contemporaries 

k v. 

O/G.deon andof Dxdzhs, Sphinx, 
Mmos,and others that liuedwthifjfrc.j 
$• VI. 



Orirhya, Tereus, Tantalus, T «V, Jj ^U^ 

$• VII, 











m 



*• Hi. 

. mi 



^S«»o 



*Af^ 



V 



'/Hicrufakfytti 

in 

i HulitUII! KjWfS »/ 



troj: 



mM 1 






of the firft Booke. 



ch,' 



VII. 

o/'Abimclech, Tholah , Wlair : and 
eftbe Lapy char , and of Thcfcus, Hyppo- 
\itm,£)(.c. and of the iVarrc of T hebcswbich 
pat tn thit Age. 



$. VIII. 
Of lephra : W haw the three hundred 
yeareswhichhe/feaketh of Iudg.i i.v.28 are 
to be reconciled with the places, Aft.ij.20. 
I.Reg tf. 1. together with fgme ither things 
touching chronologic about thefe times. 



CHAP. XI III. 

Of the Wane of Troy, 



$. I. 

OF the Genedogie of the Kings of 
Troy : with a ?(ote, touching the 
ancient Poets, how they haue obfer- 
uea tiijloricali truth. 

f II. 
of the Rape «/Helen : tndofthejlrcngth 
tf both fides for the W*rre_j. 
$. III. 
Of the Grecians tourney and Embaffage 
to Troy : and of Helena's being det/unedtn 
M^ypt -.andofthejacrificing of Iphigenia. 



$ 1 1 II. 

Of the <^icts of the Grecians at thc^ 
fiege. 

f V. 

Of the taking of T roy : the wooden Horfe: 
the Booke of Dares and Dyftis : the Colonies 
of the ReliquesofTtoy. 

$. VI. 

Of the difireffes and differ font ofthe^f 
Grcckes, returningfrom Troy. 



CHAP. XV. 

O/Sampfon, Eli , and 
Samuel. 



o 



$. I. 

v Sampfon. 

\. II. 
Of Eli : and of the i^rke taken : \ 



j and ofDagons fall : anithe fending back of 

(the Csirkes. 
$. III. 
©/"Samuel ; and of his Gouemement. 



CHAP. XVI. 

O/Saul. 



o 



$. I. 

F the deliberation to change the Gottern- 
ntcnt mo a Kingdome, 



$. II. 



Ofthe election of Siul 
hi 



$. III. 



lm 


■ 


"~ S5S 




8 K^5 


- 




- 


SES 




6S3 


• 


5 SS2 


- 






-■ 


■ 


S|| 


- 


1 


Sis 




3 


= 68 




a 






$ 




1 




G&l* 




g£S 


u 



tfc 







hi < 


I 


l%l 


' 


pip 


« 




S S s 

sis 

--- 

S S S 
SgS 

'. , 

3 8 • 


; 

■1 

! 



$■ III. 

Of the eflablifhing of Saul by his fir -ft ■victories 
\. IIII. 
of Sauls difobedience in his proceedings in 
the Wanes with the Philiftims and Amalc- 
kiccs , which caufed hisfinallrcieclion. 

\.v. 

. Of the eccurrents betweene the resection 
if Saul and his death. 




a»< 



The Contents 



$. VI. 

of fuch atliuedwith Samuel WSaul ; 
*/Hellen and Hercules, andof their iffucs, 
•upon occafion of the Dores , with the Hera- 
clida: , entring Peloponefus about thk 
timt^j. 

$. VII. 

O/Homer and Hetiod;andmany changes 
in the world that hapned about this <^ige. 



CHAP.XVIL 

0/Dauid. 



$. i. 

OF Dauids efiate in the time of Saul. 
# II. 
qftfe beginning tf/Dauids rag*.- 
and the wane made by Abner/ir Ifbofcth. 

£• ni- 

0/7A<r <fot?£ ofAbncrJtaine by Ioab : W 
*/"Ifbofeth,^ Reehab WBaunah. 
$. IIII. 

Of the purifying time of T>3Lu\dt King- 
dome : tbeuking^flsrufakm; with two 
euerthvovees giuen to /^Philiftims : and the 
conduct ion of the Arke to the Citie of Dauid. 

The ouerthrow of the Philiftims andMoa- 
bites. 



$. VI. 
The Wane which Dauid madevpon tb<^> 
Syrians. 

$. VII. 
O/Dauids troubles in bis raigne: andof 
his forces. , 

■$. VIII. 
Ofthelasl acts of Dauid : Adoniah's/i- 
#/*»: thereucngevfon Ioab WShimci. 
f IX. 
<y/^ treafurts of Dauid «ul Salo- 
mon. 

$. X. 
Of the Philiftims, whom Dauid abfelutefy 
majlered: andof fundrie other Contempora- 
ries withDzuid. 



n — I 



CHAP. XVIII. 

O/Salomon. 



0. i. 

OF theeffablf/btng of Salomon : of 
birth-right \ and of the caufe of A- 
doniah's death : and of Salomons 
wifedemc_j. 

$. H. 

0/" Salomons buildings and glorie. 

f III. 
0/ 'Salomons fending to Ophir :aW //" 
fomefeeming contradictions about Ssrio- 



mons rwfer .- Wo/Pineda's «»«// of two 
flrange pajfages about Afrique. 
$. IIII. 
Of the faff of Salomon; and hew long 
-he lined, •- ■ 

$. V. 

. of Salomons -writings. 
\. VI. 
Of the Contemporaries of Salomon. 






CHAP. 













r 












Utd *lthK 

f Vli. 



J- VI. 

• VII. 

VIII, 
'/Dauid:Adon/aA*s/i. 

■^IoaWShimei 

LIX 

H'/Daiiid^Salo- 

fX. 

'inktdirCmanfm 



atop- 

Ull 

lornon; 

V. 

to- 
il 



if' 



C0 



1 



of the firft Booke. 



CH A P. XIX. 



f .Salomons fuccejfors until! the end of 
lehoiaphat. 



f I. 

OF Rehoboarn.fe beginnings -.the 
lefeclioh of the ten Tnbcsioj Icro- 
boams idolatrie. 
$. II. 
O/Rchoboam hkimpietie, forwh'xhhe 
Wat pumfljed by Sc.'acv «/ ha endandcon- 
temporarics. 

\. III. 
Of the great baitatlefetweene Icraboam 
and Abin: nfeS <j CoroUri: of the examples 
efGodsiudgemcnts. ' 



$. -mi. 

' of Kh,and his Contemporaries. 

O/- W<r grW alteration falling out in the 
ten Tribes during the r eigne of A/a. 

- - f VI,. 

^ coniecfureoftheicaufes, hindering the 
-rcvmon of Ifracl )«76 Iuda, -which might 
haue bcene effected by thefe trcn blcs. 

f VII. 

o/Iehofaphat and his Contemporaries. 



CHAP. X X, 

O/Iehoramj^yoww^o/Iehofaphat • and 



A\ 



■ 



uzia. 




$. I. 

\Hat Iehoram Was made King fun- 
drieiimes. 

f II. 

Vrcbable comet! tires of the motiues indu- 
cing the old Ring Iehofaphjt to change his 
pnrpofe often , in making hisjonne Iehoram 
King. 

\. III. 
The doings of Iehoram vohenheerai^ned 
done: and the rebellion <?fEdom and Libna. 



£. mi. 

Of the mifcries falling ipon Ichcram.- 
and of his death. 

\. V. 

Of the raigne of A hazia.- and his bufineffe 
with the King of Ifracl. 

f VI. 
How Ahazia pen/hed with the hcufe of 
Ahab; andhow that family was deftroyedby 
Ichu. 



CHAP. XXI. 



Of Athalia and vohofe fonne he was that fue- 
ceeded ynto her. 



o 






$. I. 

V Athalia her vfurftngthe King- 
lome : and what pretences fhe might 
forge. 



$. II. 

Hove Iehu if em his time in Ifracl , fo thai 
he could not molef Athalia, 
\. III. 
0/"Athalia's Gouemcment. 
b 3 $. IIII. 




t* 



2-^ 




- i' 1 ? 


1 


3 s- 




op p. 


- 


ssa 
fess 

sis 

ssa 

sag 

i - £ 
B £ S 
s S £ 

s S ;: 


! 



I J 5! 



*»*r 



St g 



I 



. 


':!"' 


3 


s 


a;s 


s 


s 


:ss 


9 


- 


S3? 

5T R 


| 

s 



The Contents 



$. mi. 

Of the prefer nation of Ioas* 

i v. 

IVbofefonne Ioas w,«. 

t- I. 

W/W/j«- Ioas w<y bee thought likely 
to hnuebecne the forme of Ahazia. 
t- II- 
TAtf Ioas did not defend from Nathan. 

f. III. 
That Ioas may probably be thought to haue 
beene the (onne of Iehoram. 



t- I III. 

Vfonwhatreafons Athalia might feeke to 
defiroy Ioas , if bee were her owne Grand- 
child. 

$. VI. 
isf digrefion , wherein is maintained the 
liber tie efvfmg conietfurein Htftories. 
f VII. 
Theconffiracieagainfl Athalia. 

f VIII. 
The death of Athalia; withacomparifon 
of her and Iczabcl. 



CHAP. XXII. 

0/Toas WAmafia : mth their Contemporaries • 

rvherefomewhat of the building of 

Carthage. 



\. I. 

OF Ioas his doings whilefl Hehoiada 
the PncH hued. 
\. II. 
The death of Iehoiada, and Afoflafie of 
Ioas. 

\. in. 

Tbecaufes and time of the Syrians mot- 
dmg Iuda/» the dates of Ioas. 

0. mi. 

HowTachanawtrs murdered by Ioas. 

*■ v 

#iw Ioas was flume fully beaten by tbc~> 
Aramkes : andofhis dsath. 
f VI. 
Of the Princes liuinginthetime of loss : 
Ofthetime,when Carthage was bmlt : and 
o/Dido. 

VII. 
The beginning of Amazia his raigne. 
of Ioas Kmgeflfael, and Eliihathe Pro- 
fhet. 



{. VIII. • 

Of Amazia his Wane again!} Edom : 
his y^ipoltafe : andouerthrow by Ioas. 

f IX. 

A difcourfe of the reafons hindering Ioas 
from uniting Iuda to the Crowne of Ifrael, 
when he had wonne Hieru/alem , W &W 
Amazia prifoner . The end of Ioas his 
raigne^>. 

§. Xi 

The end of Amazia his raigne and life. 

$. XL 

0/7& Inter-rcgnum , or racande, that 
was inthcKmgdomeof luda after the death 
of Amazia. 

$. XII. 

Of Princes contemporarie with Amazia: 
andmore particularly ^Sardanapalus. 



CHAP. 



T 







OS 



%i 



-J* 






s 







c0 



of the firfl Boofce. 



CHAP. XXIII. 



zzia. 



f I. 

THeprofpentie ofVTi\3,andofleio- 
boam thefecond, who raignedwith 
him wl&aehof the Anarchic that 
was in the ten Tribes after the death of Iero- 
boam: Of Zacharia,Sallum,Menahem, 
end Pekahia, 

k- II- 

The end of Vina, his raigne and life. 

$. in: 

of the Prophets which Hue d in the time of 
Vzzia: and of Princes then ruling in /Egypt, 
mdtn fome other Countries. 



\- nil. 

' Of the Affyrian Kings defending from 
Phul : and whether Phul WBelofus were 
oneperfonjr Heads of Jundrie Families,that 
raigned apart in Niniue and Babylon. 

$• V. 

. 0ftheOlympuds,andthetimewhen they 
beganne_j. 

.f VI. 

Of lotham, and his Contemporaries. 

f VII. 
Of Achaz, and his Contemporaries. 



CHAP. X X 1 1 1 I. 

Of the Antiquities of ftaife ; and foundation ofKome 
in the time of Alias. 



o 



*. I- 

F f/k oW inhabitants: and ofthiLJ 
name of 'Italic. 

$. II. 

O/Vfc Aborigines, and other Inhabitants 
o/Xatium :andofthereafonofthenamcsof 
Latini,WLatium. 



\. III. 

o//fc «»«'«; %; of the Latines vnti'd 
e/£ncas /w camming. 

$. mi. 

0/"sy£neas 5 and of the Kings and Gouer- 
nours of Alba. 

$.-V. 

0///^ beginning of Rome: andefRo- 
mulus birth and death. 



CHAP. XXV. 

0/HzeIua , and his Contemporaries. 



$. I. 

OF the beginning of Ezekias: and of 
the agreeing of PtolomiesNabo- 
naffar, Nabopolaflar, and Mar- 
docempadus , with the Historic of the_j 
Bible. 

$.. II. 

Of the danger and delinerance of ludxa 
fiom Sennacherib. 



\. III. 

0/"Ezekias hisjickneffe&recotierie-.andof 
£fe Babylonian Kingthat cogratulatedhim. 

I mi. 

TheKingsthat were in Media during the\* 
raigne of Ezckia ; Of 'the difference foundbe- 
tween fundrie Authors m rehear fin? the Me- 
dian Kings : Other Contemporaries of Eze- 
kia.-^'Candaules, Gygcs, andtheKmgs 
defended from Hercules. 



I 






_ _ . 


■bJSS 


. 


ass 


N 


lis 


-'" 


III 


. 


-63 

.:: S g 


3 






aS 








= 65 








ssg 









•^ 



CHAP. 



f I. 

Tmt many names if Egyptian 
Kings, foHtid in Hijlorie , arelik^j 
to haue belonged only to riceroies : 
Jncxamp[e,prouingtbis,OHtofWi\\'un\of 
Tyre his Hijlorie of the holy warre. 
f II. 
0/"Acherres; whether hee were Vcho- 
reus , tbat-wos the eighth from Ofyman- 
dyas : Of Oiymandyas, and his Tombe. 
$. HI. 
Of Chcms , Armeus, RamefTes, and 
Amenophis : Of Myris, and the Lake that 
beares hit name. 

$■1111 

of the Kings that raigned in the Dynaftie 
o/V^Larthes. 




•MB* 



The Contents 



CHAP. XXVI. 



Of the Kjngs that raignedm iEgypt, bemeenethedeliue* 

ranee oflhaclfrom thence y and the raigne, o/Eztkia. 

inluda. , rehen ^gypt mi luda made 

a league againjl the 



AlTy 



'nans. 

A. V. 
Of v£%yymr\ Kings y whofe names are^> 
found frittering in fundrie Authors, their 
times bemgnot recorded: TheKings of v£- 
gypt,according to Cedrcnus ■ of Vaphrcs 
and Scfac. 

% VI - 

O/Chemmis, Cheops, Ccphrcnes, 
and ether Kings recited by Herodotus 
and Diodorus Siculus , which raigned be- 
tweene the times o/Re,hoboam and E- 
zekia. 

$. VII. 

Of Scthon , who raigned -with Eze- 
kia , andfidedwuh him againjl Sennache- 
rib. 



CHAP. XXVII. 

Q/ManafTe and his Contemporaries. 



§. I. 

THe wickcdmfjc of Manafles : His 
Imprifrnment, repent ance,& death. 
'f II. 
Of troubles in ^gypt following the death 
"/Section -.Theraigne ^/'Pfammiticus. 
f III. 
What reference thefe Egyptian matters 
might haue to the imprifrnment and enlarge- 
ment of "Manafles- In what part of 'his raigne 
Manaffcs was taken prifoner. 



^ mi. 

ofthefrfiandfrcondMcSknhn wanes 
which were in the raignes */ Ezekia, and Ma- 
naflcs, iswg'^luda. 

$■ V. 

Of the Kings that were in Lydia andUc- 
dia : Whether Dcioces were that Kin?; Ar. 
phaxad mentioned in the Hiflorie of Iudith 
k- VI. 

Of other Princes and attions that Were in ' 
thofe times. 



CHAP. 







Bait*'.' 
tip;**' 



s* 



( Htl 



t ^'0f% 



.<*■ 



c0 



of the firft Bookc 



CHAP. XXVIII. 



Of the times from the death ofM anaffe s to the deflruBion 
o/^Ierufalem. 



OF Aramon W Iofiasi 
f II. 
o/"PharaoNcco,//;.tf fought with 
Iofias : O/Iehoahaz^wilehoiakim,^/^ 
e/Iuda. 

$. III. 
o///^ Kings of Babylon W Media : 
How it cime to paffe that the Kings of Babel 
f «»/<^ w/ £■/«£• attendance on their bufneffe 
in Syria - which caufed them to loofe that 
Promnce. 

$. IIII. 

The great Expedition of the Scythians, 
who ruled in Aha eight mdtwentte yeares. 



t. I. 

T He time of this Expedition. 
t. II. 
What Tuitions they were that brake into 
Afiaj withthe caufe of 'their wttrnie. 
t- III. 
Of the Cimmerians Wane in Lydia. 

t. III I. 
The Warn of the Scythians in the higher 
Afia. 

\. V. 
Of Princes Hum* in diners Countries in 
thefe Ages. 

\. VI. 
The opprefwn of ludxa, and deflruttion 
«/"Icrufalem by the Chaldeans. 



■« 



MM 



jgg<i 









£l 






The Contents of the Chapters, Paragraphes, and 

Sections, in the third Booke of the firll 

Part of the Hifloric of the 

VV oil d. 

CHAPTER I. 

Of the time pa/sing betveeene the dejlruBion of lerufalem, 
and the fall of the Afsyrian Empire^,, 




$. I. 

?F the. connexion of f acred and 
jN32 prophage Kifiorie— J. 
\\. I I. 
^yi briefe rehearfalloftwo 
opinions , touching the begin- 
r.ing of the Captiuitie -.with an an fw ere to the 
cnuii/s of Vorphyr\c,imteighing agatnfi Saint . 
Mathcw«#i Daniel, tpon whom the later ' 
of thefe opinions is founded. 
$. III. 
That the 70. yeares of captiuitie are to bee 
mtmbredfrom the dejlructionof "Ierufalem; ' 
not from the migration o/lechonia. 

$. IIII. 

Sundrie opinions of the Kings which raig- 
nedin Babylon during the -jo. yeares. 



h. V. 

<_•/ more particuLr examination of one o^ 
pinion touching the number , perfons , and 
raignes of the Babylonian Kings, 
\. VI. 
What may bee held as probable of the Per- 
fons and Times of Nabuchodonofor his 
Succeffers. £ yil. 

Of the vi$ tries which Nabuchodonofor 
obtayned, between the deftruction of Ierufa- 
lem andconquejl o/^Egy pr. 
$. VIII. 
That .(Egypt was conqncred,andthe King, 
therinraigning flame by Nabuchodonofor, 
contrarie to the opinion of most Authorsrtvho 
following Herodotus and Diodorus, relate 
iteiherwifz-j, 

. ' $- IX. 



n 




■ 



-§* 



0. IX. 

How i/£gypt was fubdued Mid htld by 
Nabucliadnezzar. 

$. X. 

Of the fundrie accompts drawnc from fun- 
drie Aft s of Nebuchadnezzar : and of the 
deJlrucJion ^Niniue by him; the time of 
which Action is vncertoine. 
f XL 

Ofthe later time ^Nebuchadnezzar; his 
buildings, madneffe, and death. 



$. I. 

THi/ the Medcs were chiefs Aftors 
in thcfubucrf.on of the Babylonian 
Empires. 

By what meanes the Em fire was tr inflated 
from the Medes to the Perfians. 




*»JK- 



The Contents 



f XII. 

0/ r Euilmcrodach. 

f XIII. 

\yi priuate coniecJure of the Authour; 
feruing to make good thofe things which are 
cited out of Berofiis , concerning the Sue- 
ccjfors of Euflmerodach , without wrong 
to the truth; thequalitie, and death of Bih 
thafar. 



CHAP. II. 



Of the originatt and fir/} greatneffe of the 
Periians. 



\. Hi. 

Xcnophons relation of the Wane, which 
the Medes andPcrCrjas made with iojnt for- 
ces vfon the Aflynans and others. 

$. mi. 

Theejlate of the Medcs and Perfians** 
times foregoing this great Warren. 



CHAP. Hi. 

Of Cyrus. 



\. i. 

OF Cyrus hit name and firjt ani- 
ons. 
$. II. 

O/Croefus the King ofhydxi, who made 
IVarre vpott Cyrus. 

$. III. 

Croefus his expedition againfl Cyrus. 

$. IIII. 

The concpueft of Lydia by Cyrus. 



*• v. 

ffowCyrmwonne Babylon. 
$. VI. 

The end of Cyrus. 

$. VII. 
O/Cyrus hi* decree for building thetem- 
ple ofcodinlerudkm. 

$. VIII. 
Of Cyrus hu ijfue -.and whether Atofla, 
was his Daughter , or (asfomethtnke) were 
the fame with Qnecne Heftcr. 



CHAP. 



J& 



V* 






r 



















*» 



ofthefirftBooke. 



CHAP. mi. 

The eflate of things from the death of Cyrus to 
the raigne of D arias. 



$. I- 

, F the number and names of the^> 
r Perfian Kings. 

Of Ca mbytes ; And the conquering of 
ts£ gypt by him. 




$. I'll. 

The reft of Cambyfes his A els. 

\. mi. 

0/>& Inter-regnum fo/jr«ow Camby- 
fes and Darius. 



^ 



CHAP. V. 

Of Darius the Sonne <?/ Hyftafpes. 



$. I. 

OF Darius his Linage. 
$. II. 
O/ Darius & Gouememem ; 
and fupprefing the rebellion tf/Babylon. 

0/Darius hisfauour to the Icwcs «z fe/- 
ding the Temple. 

$. mi. 

of Danus his Scythian nwc.;. 

I V. 
Some aliens eftbeVctCansin Europe, 
^fc?r the Scythian IVarre. 



f VI. 

7& 7S7? <>««/&» tf///^ /// jm . wfafj jj a _ 

nusmadevpon Greece ; jw/Z> arehearfallof 
the Gouernement in Athens j whence thef^ 
quarrell grew. 

\ VII. 

o/V/* Ionian .AVfeZw* , nfeS »^ //,<^, 
pnncipallcaufe of the wanes enfuing between 
Greece andPcrCa, 

$. VIII. 

r*« W»w »'&^ Darius w^ ^ fl » 

Greece ; mth thehattaikof Marathon;and 
Darius & ^//6. 



Q0- 



Of- 

TM. 
He preparation of Xerxes again}? 
Greece, 
f' ft. 

Xerxes Armie entertained £)<Pythius : 
his cutting off 'Mount Athosfiom the Conti- 
nent .- his bridge of Boats ouer the Hells- 

F° n t '" *" d the ^fi our fi betweene hm and 
Artabanus vyontbe view of his Armies. 

\. III. 

Of the fights at T h ermopy \x and A rtc- 
mifiurn. 

$. mi. 

The attempt of Xerxes -vpon Apollo's 
Temple : and his taking of Athens. 



CHAP. VI. 
Xerxes. 



$. v. 

How Thcmiftocles the Athenian drey 

the Greekcs to fight at Salamis. 
f VI. 
HowthcVexiizns confuted about gluing 
battaile : and how Themiftodes by paMicie 
held the Grcekes to their reflation-^ with the 
■viilerie at Salamis thereupon enfi ting. 
\ VII. 
of 'things following after the battaile of Sa- 
lamis : and of the flight of Xerxes. 
\. VIII. 
The negotiations between MardoniusW 
the Athenians ; as alfe betweene the Athe- 
nians and Lacedaemonians ; after the fight 
of Xerxes. 

h. IX. 




The Contents 



$. XI. 

Of the barbarous qualttie of Xerxes : with 
a tranfition from the Perfian affaires to mat- 
ters of Greece, which from this time grew 
more wort hie of regard. 



CHAP. VII. 

Of things that faffed in Greece from the end of the-* 

Perfian wane , to the beginning of the 

Peloponnefian. 



fr. I. 

Ow Athens was rebuilt and for- 
tified. 

$. II. 

The beginning of the Athenian greatnes, 
andprofperotu wanes made by that State vp- 
ontheVerdan. 



The death ofXcrxes by the treafon ofhr- 
tabanus. 

\. mi. 

The banifhment ^Thcmiftocles • his 
fright to Artaxcrxcs newly raigning in Per- 
fia ; and his death. 



$. V. 

How the Athenians, breaking the peaces 
which to their great honour they had mades 
with the Perfian, were fhamefully beaten in 
^Egypt. 

\. VI. 
Of other wanes made by the Athenians 
(for the moil part) with good fuccejfe, about 
thcfamct'me. 

\. VII. 
O/Artaxerxcs Longimanus,f/w^<rn><« 
Ahalhuerolh, the husband of QueeneUc- 
ftcr. 

£. VIII. 
Of the troubles in Greece , foregoing the 
Peloponnefian Wane. 



CHAP. VIII. 

Of the Peloponnefian #Vre_>. 



\. i. 

V? on what termes the two principal 
Cities of Greece, AthenscfSpar- 
tajloodat the beginning of the X?e- 
\o^onr\e^\m Wane. 

$. II. 
How Sparta and Athens entred into 
Wane. 

$. III. 

The beginning of the Peloponnefian 
Wane. 

\. 1 1 II. 

Of the great loffe which the Spartans re- 
edited at Pylus. 



*■ v. 

How the Lacedarmonians hardly , and to 
their great difaduantage , obtained a peace, 
that was not well kept. 

$. VI. 
Of the negotiations and praclifcs held be- 
tweene many States of Greece, by occafron of 
the peace that was concluded. 
\. VII. 
How the peace between Athens and Spar- 
ta was ill kept, though not openly broken. 

k : VIII. 
The AtheniansvWwg' two fleets tofack Sy- 
X&cuk,areput to fight & utterly difcomfited. 

f IX. 






H 



:' ; ,,... ■ 















)? 



\ 



of the third Booke. 



$. IX. 

Of the troubles wherein to the State of A • 
thcns/<r//, after the great lofifr of the Fleet, 
andArmie,in Sicilia. 

$ X. 
How Alcibiades wan many important vi- 
ctories for the Athenians ; was recalled from 
exile; wade their Generall ; andagaine de- 
fofel . 



f XI. 

Thebattmleat Arginufe ■ and condemna- 
tion of the victorious Athenian Captaines 
by the people. 

$■ XII, 

Thehtttrileat t^gos- Potamosj, wherein 
thewhole State of Athens was ruined; with 
the endof'tbeVdonomziim Warrc. 



CHAP. IX. 



Of matters concurring rpith the Peloponnefiannwr^ 
or Jhortly following tt t 



$. i. 

HOw the affaires ofPerCuflood 'in thefe 
times. 

\. II. 
How the thirtie Tyrants get their Do- 



minion in Athens . 

$• in. 

The confpiracieagainfl the thirtie Tyrants- 
and their deposition. 



tfc 






CHAP. X. 

Of the expedition of Cyrus theyonger. 



$ i. 

THe grounds oj Cyrus his attempt a- 
gainfl his brother. 
$. II. 
The preparations of Cyrus ; atidhisfirfl 
en trie into the l far re. 

$. HI. 
How Cyrus tooke his iournie into the 
higher Alia, and came vp clofeto his brother. 

\. mi. 

Thehattaile betweene Cyrus <?#^Artax- 
crxes. 

\. V. 
"the hardeflateof the Grcekcs after the 
fight; and bow Artaxcrxes in vaine fought 
to haue made themyeeldvnto him. 
\. VI. 
How the Grcekcs began to reiurne home- 
Wards. 

b. VII. 
How T iflapherncs vnder colour of peace, 
betraiedallthe Captaines of the Greekes. 

$. VIII. 
Bow Xenophon beamed the Greekes, and 



in deffight of TiiTapherncs went offfafely. 
$. IX. 

The difficulties which the Greeke ^Jrmie 
found, in fifing through the Land of the 
Garduchi. 

$, X. 

How Tenbazus Gouernour of Armcnh, 
feeking to entrap the Grcekcs with termesof 
fained peace, was d/J "f pointed, andfhtmeful- 
ly beaten. 

$. XI. 

The paffage of the ^Armieto Trabizondc 
through the Countries bordering upon the 
Riuer tf/P halls, and other ebfeure Nations. 
\. XII. 

Bow the Arm'e beganat Trabizonde/o 
prouide a Fleet, wherewith to returnehemeby 
Sea . Hoa> it came into the Territorie of Si- 
nope, and. there profecuted the fame purpofe 
to effect. 

$. XIII. 

Of'dtffenfon which arofein theArmie;and 
bow it was embarqued. 

c $. xii n. 




The Contents 



$. xv. 

Of diners peeces of feruice done by Xeno- 
phon ; and how the Armie returned inta 
Greece. The otcafioris of the wane betweene 
/feLacedarmonians and the Perfian. 



CHAP. XI. 

Of the affaires ^Greece, vbilejt they veeremannttged 
by the Lacedaemonians. 



$. r. 

Ow the Laccdarmonians took cou- 
rage by example of Xcnophons 
Armie, to make wane vpen Ar- 

*. "• 

The proffer ous beginnings of the wane in 
Alia. 

How the Laced asmonians tooke rcuenge 
•vpon theHcans for old difpleofure. Thedif- 
wMmtsjifthe Corinthians and Thebans, 
comeiuedagainft the State <?/"Sparta. 

$. mi. 

The paffhge of Agefilaus into Ada. His 
wanemtb T lihyhcrncs. How Tiflaphcr- 
lies was put to death ; and the wane diuerted 
into another Prouince, through ferfwafon 
and gifts tf/Tithrauftes his fucceffor. How 
curelejfe the Perfian Lieutenants were of the 
Kings good. 

\. V. 

The wane., and treatie , betweene Agefi- 
laus WPharnabazus. 
$. VI. 

The great commotions raifed in Greece, 
fy/A? Thebans and others , thatwere hired 
with grtdftom the Perfian. 



£ VII. 

How Agefilaus was called out of ACia, ta 
helpc his Countrie. A -vtclorie of the Spar- 
tans. Conon the Athenian , afsifled by 
Pharnabazus , ouer-comes the Lacedxmo- 
riianfieet 5 recoucrsthemaftrte of the Sens : 
and rebuilds the walls ^Athens. 

$. VIII. 

Offundrie fmtli 'viffmes, gotten en each 
part. ThcLaccdxmrmhnsleofea/ltr.M'm. 
The Athenians receuer feme part ef then- 
old Dominion. 

$. IX. 

The bafe conditions offered vnto the Pcrfi. 
an by the Lacedaemonians. off tl »drie_j 
fights, and other paffages in the wane. The 
peace of Antalcidas. 

\. X. 

The wane which the Lacedaemonians 
w^<r^«»01ynthus. They take Thebes 
by treafon, and Olynrhus by famine, 

$. XI. 

Hew the Thebans recouered their liber- 
tie, driuingoutthe Lacedemonian Gani- 
fon. 



CHAP. XII. 

Of the flouri/hingettate of ThshtSy from the'Battaile 
Leudtra, to the "Battaile of 
Mantinasa. 



Ow Thebes and Athens ioyned 
together againfi- Sparta . How the 
Athenians made peace for them- 



flues, and others : out of wkch theThe- 
bans were excluded. Thebattaile o/Lcuftra 
W htgmmngcfthe Thcban greatneffe. 

\- II. 



IJUff* 



\x 



K 






/* 



^'tr'J\ 



I tf tkir 



of the fourth Booke. 



$: ri; . 

How the Athenians tithe vpon them to 
m untaine the peace of Greece >.?{jw troubles 
hence arifrng. Epaminondas invadetband 
wafleth the Territorie 0/"Laccda:mon. 

$. III. 

the tompofition betweene Athens and 
Sparta, for command in warreagainfl thtL^ 
Thcbans ; whoagaine invade andfpoile^j 
Pcloponnefus. The unfortunate frefump- 
tion of the Arcadians. 

f IIII. 

The great growth of the T heban Rfate. 
Embaffages of the Greckes to the Perfian ; 
with the reaf ons why he mo ft ftuoured the; 
Tbebans. Troubles in the Perfian Empire. 
Thefiuitlejfe ijfue of the Embaffages. 



*. V. 

How all Greece w.is divided; between the 
Athenians azfc/Laccdarmonians, or,tk_j 
one fide, and T hebans on the other. Of the 
great tumults rifin^ in Arcadia 
\. VI. 

i_J terrible invaf/on of Pcloponncfusjy 
Epaminondas. 

$. VII. 

The great battaile ofM a n t i f i x a . The ho- 
norable death of Epaminondas ; with hit 
commendation. 

$. VIII. 

Of the peace concludedm Greece after the 
batt.uleof- Mantinasa. Thevoiage of Age- 
filaus into .Egypt. His deatb,md qualities^ 
with an examination of the comparison, made 
betweene him andPompey the Roman. 




The Contents of the Chapters, Paragraph^ and 

Sections, in the Fourth Booke of the firit Part 

of the Hiftbrie of the 

Would. 

CHAPTER I. 

O/Phili'p, the Father of Alexander the great, 
fQngofMacedon. 

Hat A'ings reigned in Mace 
don before Philip. 



w 



\. II. 

Thehegimmgof Philipsraj/w 1 ; andhow 
he deliuered Maccdon from the troubles , 
wherein he found it entangled. 
$. III. 

The goodfuccefewhichPhilip had in ma- 
ny enterprifes. 

k- HIE 
Of the Phocian Wane: which firft drew 
Philip into Greece. 

$. V. 
O/V^Olynthian Wane. The ambitions 
frtclifes of Philip. 



$. VI. 

How Philip ended the Phocian IVarre. 



$. VII. 

How Philip with tffueceffe attempt edvp* 
in Perinchus, Bizantium, and the Scy- 
thians. 

$. VIII. 

How Ph i ! ip, ouerthr owing the Greekes in 
the battaile of Cheronxa , was chofen Cap- 
taine Generallof Greece. The death ('/Phi- 
lip. 

$. IX. 

What good foundations of Alexanders 
greatneffe were laid 'by Philip, of his lauda- 
ble qadities,andiffue. 



CHAP. II. 

Of Alexander the Qreat. 

Brief rehearf,//^ Alexanders doings, How Alexander, fafing into Mn, fought 

j w^^Perfians^W;m/Mr<7/Granicus 
c * \.1U. 



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f III. 

c^ digrefton , concerning the defence of 
Bardpaffages. Of things following the battailc 
o/Granick. 

$• IIII. 
Of thevnwarlikc Armieleuiedby Darius 
againft Alexander. The vnaduifed ceurfes 
rthichDzrimteoke in this Expedition. He is 
■vanqwfljedatlftus ; where his Mother, wife, 
and children, are madeprifoners. Of feme_j 
things followingthebattatle of "IflTus. 

$ V. ' 

How Alexander beficgedandwanne thc^> 
CitieofTyre. 

$. VI. 

How Darius tf/f«r,sf conditions of peace to 
Alexander. Alexandcriw'ww Gaz3,tnd 
deales gracioufly with the Ie vves. 

k- VII. 

Alexander winner lAigypt : andmakes* 
hurnieto the Temple of Hamrnon. 

£. VIII. 
How Alexander marching againft Da- 
rius , was otfofed very unskilfully by the E-, 
netnie. 

f IX. 

The new prouifuns of 'Darius. Occidents 
foregoing the btttaile #/Arbela. 

fx. 

The btttaile of Arbela: and that it could 
net bee fo ftrongly fought , as report hath 
made it. 

$. XI. 

Ofthingsfo Hewing the battaile of 'Arbela. 
Theyeeldmg c/Babjlon and Sub. 



$. XII. 

How Alexand er came to Perfcpolis, and 
burnt it. 

$. XIII. 
ThetreafenofBcSiisagainflDarius.Da- 
vim his death. 

§. XIIII. 
How Alexander purfued BefTus, and 
teeke into his graceDitius his Captaines. 
$. XV. 
G/Thaleftris Queene efthe Amazons 5 
■where, by way ofdigrefion, it isfhewed, that 
fuch Amazons haue beene, and are. 
$. XVI. 
How Alexander fell into the Perfians/*- 
xurie i and hew he further purfuedBeiim. 
$. XVII. 
A confpiracie agamft Alexander. Thc^r 
death o/philotas and Parmenio. 
£. XVIII. 
How Alexander fubduedthe Ba&rians, 
Sogduns,asd ether people. How Bcflus was 
dehueredinto his hands. How he fought with 
the Scythians. 

f XIX. 
How Alexander flew hu ewne friends. 

$. XX. 
0/^ Alexanders iournieinto India. The 
battailebetweene him and Porus. 
$. X.XI. 
How Alexander finifhed his Expedition, 
and returned tut o/India. 
£. XXII. 
O/Alexanders riot, crueltie, and death. 

$. XXIII. 
O/Alexanders perfon, and qualities. 



CHAP. III. 

The reigne of Arickeus. 
$. I. 

OF the que fl ion about fuccefion to 
Alexander. 
f II. 
Theelection of At'ldxas ; with the trou- 
bles thereabout arifing : the firU dmifion of 
the Empire. 

k- HI. 

The beginning of the Lamian wane. 

$. IIII. 
How Perdiccas emploiedhis Armie. 
$. V. 
i Theproceffc of the Lamian warre. 



Of the peace granted to Athens by Anti- 
pater, of Demo&hcncs his death. 
I- VII. 

Hew Craterus and Antipatcr wert_j 
drawn from their jEcolian warns into Afia. 
The grounds efthe firfi ciuill warre between'e 
/^Macedonian Lords. 
$• VIII. 

Vcx&iccashis lioytagcintOiAoyw. and 
his death. r 

$. IX. 

F'tforiesefEximeneswtheUwerAfa. 

$. X. 



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XX. 

bw«) India. A 

V. v ]. 

tojbtikhftkn 

m 

XI L 

,CTulttt,inlid, 

till 



iiJtitk 

■ t ,tli»tthW' 



of the fourth Booke. 



$. x. 

Qnarrells bctweenc Eurydice the Qiteene, 
and Python the Protestor. Py cbonrefignes 
his Office j into which Antipater n chojen. 
f XI. 
Antigonus, Lieutenant ofA(\a,winnes a 
iattaile of Eumenes , and beficgethbim in 
Nora./fc vanquifheth other followers s/Per- 
diccas. 

$. XII. 
Pcolemic voinncs Syria and Phoenicia. 
The death ^/Antipater. 

f XIII. 
of Polylpcrchon , vtho fuccceded %<nio 
Antipater in the Proteftorfhip. The infurre- 
ilion ^Caflandcr again ft him. 
\. XIII I. 
The vnworthy courfes , held by Poly fper- 
chon,/or thekcep'wg downeof Callander. 
£. XV. 
Of the great commotions raifedin Athens 
by Polyfpcrchons decree.The death <?/Pho- 
cion. 

h. XVI. 
of Poly fpcrchon his -vaine Expedition a- 
gainft Callander. 

\. XVII. 
Antigonus feekes to make himfelfe an ab- 
folutc Lord: and therevpon tr eat es with Eu- 
men&fvho difappomteth him. Phrygia and 
\.yd\zwonne by Antigonus. 



$. XVIII. 
Antigonus/w/«ci' Eumcncs. Eumencs 
bauwg authorise from the Court , raifeth 
great warrc sgainft Antigonus in defence of 
the Royallhoitfe. 

$. XIX. 
How the Princes of Macedon flood affe- 
cted mutually . Olympias takes Aridxus 
and Eurydkc^homfhe cruelly puts to death. 

£. XX. 

How Caflandcr was reucnged vpon O- 
lympias. 

t- r. 

Ttie great expedition of 'Caflandcr. O- 
ly mpiasyfc/j- her felfe into Pydna.s^ir 
Caflandcr befiegeth her. JEzcidcs, King of 
Epirus, camming to fuccour Olympias , it 

ferftken % and banzjbed by his ownefubiecJs. 

t- II- 
A continuation ofO 1 y m p ia s her (lories. 
Polyfperchon defeated. Extreme famine i» 
Pydna. Olympias yeelds to Callander. 

t. HI. 

The death ofOlympm.-aitdher condition* 

t- HII. 
Caflandcr celebrates the funerall of Arf- 
dxus and Eurydice ; andfeeks to make him' 
felfe King <?/'Maccdon . 



CHAP. mi. 

Of the great Lordjliij) which A ntigon us 
got in Afia. 



$. I. 

THe iournie (/Eumenes into Perfia. 
His wife dealing with thofe that ioy- 
ned with him. 

f II. 
How Antigonus » commingto fetvpon 
Eumenes, was driuen off with loffe. 
$. III. 
o/'Eumcncs his cunning. A battaile be. 
tweene hint and Antigonus . 

£. nn. 

Of diuers firatagems pracTifed by Antigo- 
nus, and Eumenes ; oneaeainftthe other. 
$. V." 

The conffiracie of pc u cc Acs and others » a- 
gamjl Eumencs his life. 



b VI. 

The loft battaile betweene Antigonus and 
Eumencs. 

•fc VII. 
Hem Eumenes was betraied to Antigo- 
nus, and flame. 

$. VIII. 
How Antigonu i >y?«*' Pithon,and occupied 
Media. How he remsued Gouernours ofpro- 
uinces , and made himfelfe Lord of Perfia j 
carrying away Peuceftcs. 

\. IX. 

How Selcucus vca<s chafed out of Babyhn, 
by Antigonus. The great riches ^/Anti- 
gonus. 

c 3 CHAP. 



, M 



-&> 



III* 



*»«Bf 



The Contents 



CHAP. V. 



Of 'the great ciuillwarre between e Alexanders Captaines: 
and how they ajjumedtbe name and 
flate qflQpgs. 



}. I. 

THe combination of Ptolemie.CafTan- 
dcr, andothers, againH Antigonus. 
Their demands, and bis an fixer 

*■ n. 

The preparations and beginnings of the 
Wanes. 

f III. 

How each part fought to win theafiftame 
of Greece. A n tigonus his declaration againft 
Callander. Alexander, thefonne of Poly- 
fpcrchon, reuoltethfiom Antigonus ,who 
hadfet him vp. 

\. mi. 

' The JEtolkns rife againft Callander,/'* 
favour of Antigonus , and are beaten. A 
Fleet, and Land- Armie /?/Antigonus, ut- 
terly defeated by Ptolemies Leiutenant. In 
what termesthewar flood at this time. An- 
tigonus d/awes nearer to Greece. 
$. V. 

How Lyfimachus and Callander van- 
quifbedfome enemies , rat fed again 'ft them by 
^ntigonus.Thegoodfucceffe ^/Antigonus 
in Afia and Greece : with the rebellion of 
manie Cities againft Callander. 
^. VI. 

Vitferies fl/Ptol emie by Sea. A great bat- 
taile at Gaza, ivfo^Ptolemie and Seleucus 



wan, againfl Demetrius the ftonne of Anti- 
gonus. £. VII. 

How Seleucus rawwWBabylon , and 
made himfelfe Lord of man] Countries in the 
higher Alia. The Mrs. of the Kmgdome of 
the Greekes ; which began with this Domi- 
nion of Seleucus. 

f VIII. 
-fliwPtoIemie loft attthat hee hadwonin 
Syria. What the caufes were of the quiet obe- 
dience, perfourmedvnto the Macedonians, 
by thofe that had beene fubiecl vnto the Per- 
sian Empire. Of diuerspettie enterprises^ 
ken in hand by Antigonus and Demetrius, 
with ill fucceffe. 

$. IX. 
A general/ peace, made and broken. How all 
the houfe of Alexander was defer eted. 
k- X. 
How Demetnu , thefonne of Antigo- 
nus, gauehbertie ^Athens ; expelling the 
Garrifons o/Ca dander out of thofe parts. 
The immoderate honours decreed by the A- 
thenians to Antigonus WDernetrius. 
f XI. 
The great viclorieof Demetrius againft 
Ptolemies Cyprus. How Antigonus and 
Dcm c triu s tooke vpon them the ft tie of kings; 
wherein others followed their example. 



CHAP. VI. 



OJ the wanes betweene the Kjngs of Mgypt, Afia, Ma- 

cedon,Thrace, W<tf/>m ; intiliatl Alexanders 

'Princes were confirmed. 



$. I. 

He expedition s/Antrgonus againft 
fclWi-wttbiL fucceffe. 

$. II. 

How the Citie */ Rhodes was befekedby 
Demetrius. ' 



T 



^ in. 

How Demetrius preuailed in Greece. 
Caffander^yfrw/^ of Antigonus, and 
cannot obtaineit. Great preparations of war 
againft Antigonus. 

$. mi. 

How Antigonus wasflaineinagreatbat- 

tailt 



w 



Hi 






§H 



J* 



VttfH 



'Dm,. 



of the fife Booke. 



taileatlpfus, nearevr.to Ephefus ; wherein 
hit whole eftate was left, 
J. V. 
How Demetrius, forfakenbythe Athe- 
nians^/- his ouerthrow , was reconciled to 
SeIeucus*#i/Ptolcmie : beginning a new 
fortune, mdfhortly entringmin new quar- 
rels. 

f VI. 
How Demetrius wanne theCitie of A- 
thens i mdpreuailedtn Greece, but loft in 
Afia. Of troubles in Macedon folio wing the 
death of Callander. 

0. VII. 
0/~ Pyrrhus, Wfo doings in Mace- 
don. rAr death of Cnfcindcrs children. 
Dcmctrius^/j the Kingdom of Macedon: 



preuailes in war agunftthe Groekes ; /««/£/;& 
reputation in Ins warre againft Py rrh u s, and 
in his cimlgouemmcnt^and prepares to winne 
Afia. How a'l confpire againft Demetrius. 
Pyrrhus and Lyfimnchirs inuade him: his 
Atmie yeelds to Pyrrhus ; ivho fhares thc^> 
Kingdomeof Macedon with Lyfimachus. 
$. VIII. 

How Demetrius, gathering forces, enter* 
prifedmany things with ill 'fuccejfejn Greece 
and Alia. How he was driuen vpon SelcuciHj 
and compelled to yeeld himfclfe.His imprifon- 
ment and death. 

f IX. 

The death of Ptolemxc, of Lyfimachus, 
a»dofSckucus,that wastheitft ofhhxm- 
ders Captames : with other occurrences. 



CHAP. VII. 

The growth of Rome. : and felling of the Eajlerm 
Kingdomes. 



HOw the Romans enlarged their do. 
minion in Italic, from the death of 
Tullus Hoftihus, -vntofuchtime 
as they were affiled byPyrrhus. 

* II. 

How Pyrrhus -warred vpon the Romans, 
and vanqui/hedthem in two battailes. 

fill. 

The great troubles in Macedon and S ici 1. 
How Pyrrhus, be'mgmuitedinto Sicil „/&■-. 
feoke Italie ; wannelhem.ofiofthe lfte;and 



fS« 



«x> 



loftitin[hortfi>tce. Pynhusrelitrnesinto I- 
tuYw ; where he is beaten by the Romans,W 
\ Jo goes back to his owne Kingdome. 

$. mi. 

How An ti°onus,thefon»e ^/"Demetrius 
deliuered Macedon from the Gaules. How 
Pyrrhus wonne the Kingdome of Macedon 
/w«Antigonus. 

- *• V.,_ 

How Pyrrhus af ailed Sparta without 
fucceffe. His enterprife v^on Argos; and 

his death. 

■ '■ . 



mm 



The Contents -of the Chapters, Paragraphes, and 

Sections, in the Fife Booke of the firfj Part 

of the Hiftoric of the . ■ 

Wok. ld. 

CHAPTER I. 

Of the fir ft Pupick Warrt-j. 



Vifcufsion of that Probkmeof 
int; Whether the Ro- 
mans could hauercfifted the 
great Alexander. That 
Mc£3a§ neither the Macedonian, nor 




the Roman Souldier,w.u ofeqimttvakurto 
//kEnglilb. 

{. II. 
The eft ate of Carthage, before it entred 
into wane with Rome. 

\. HI. 



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The Contents 



f in. 

The beginning of tk first Punfck Warre. 
That itwasvniujlly -undertaken by theKo- 
mans. 

$. mi. 

OfthelLmd«jS\ci\. 

t. I. 

*T*Hecjtnditic of the iknd: and the first in- 
■*■ habitants thereof. 

t. II. 
The plantation of the Greckeswsi Sicil. 

t III. 
Of the gouernemcnt and affaires ef Sia], 
before Dionyfius his tyrannic. 

t. mi. 

ofDionyCwstheTyrant;andothersfol- 
lowing bi m> m Syracufe. 

A recontinuation of the Roman warrein 
Sicil. How Micron, KingofSytacuCe,for- 
fookethe Carthaginians ; andmadehUptice 
with Rome. 

t VI. 
How the Romans befiege , and winnt A- 
grigcntum. Their beginning to mtintainea 
fleet. Their fir fi loffe, and fir ft vutorie by Set. 
Of Sen-fight in general!. 

$. VII. 
Diners enter feats of wane, betweene the 
KomsnsandCinh^mzm,withvariaUe 
ficcejfe. The Roman* prepare to inuade A- 
frick : and ok nine a great viftorie at Sea. 



$. VI IL 

The Romans \preuaile in Africk. Atilius 
the Confulpropoundeth intolerable conditions 
of peace to the Carthaginians. Heisvtterly 
beaten ', and made prifoner. 
$. IX. 

How the affaires of Carthage proffered 'af- 
ter the viBorieagainfl Atilius. How the Ro- 
mans, hauinglost their fleet by tempefi, re- 
folueto for fake the Seas. The great aduanta- 
gesofagoodfleetin warre, betweene Nattont 
dtmded by the Sea. 

0. X. 
How the R omans attempt againe to get 
themaflrieoftheSeas. The victorieofCx- 
cilius the Roman Confdat Panormus.T^ 
fiege of Lily boeum. How a Rhodian Galley 
entredUly boeum atpleafure, in delight of 
the R oman fleet. That it is a matter of great 
difficultie, te flop the faff age of good /hips. 
The Romans, byreafon ofgriettous lojjes re- 
ceded , vnder Claudius and Iunius their 
Con/ids, abandon the Seas againe. 
$. XI. 
The Citie ofEryx is furprifedly the Ro- 
mms,and recovered by Amilcarj who flout' 
ly holds warre with them fine yeares.The Ro- 
mans baaing emptied their common treafu- 
rie, build a new fleet, at the charges of ' priuate 
men. The great victorieatSea, of Luftatius 
theConful; whereby the Carthaginians are 
forced to craue peace. The conditions of the 
peace betweene Rome and Carthage. 



CHAP. II. 

Of diners aUions pafsing betweene the fir si andjecond 
Punfck Warres. 




$. r. 

F the crueti warre, begunne between 
j the Carthaginians, andthe'tr ewne 
Mercinaries. 

\. II. 
Diucrs obferuations vfon this warre with 
the Mercinaries. 

t- I. 
f~\F Tyrannie : and how Tyrants are dri- 
^~s (ten to vfe helfe efCMcrcinaries, 

f. II. 

That the Tyrannic of a Citie otter her fub- 
ieffs, is worfe than the Tyrannie of one man : 



and that a tyrannical Citie mufl likewifevfe 
mercinarie Stuldiers. 

t. III. 

The dangers , growing from the vfe of 
mercinarie Souldiers, and f err eigne Auxilia- 
ries. 

t- mi. 

That the moderate Gouernemcnt of the^j 
s\ovt\W\s,gr.tte them ajfttranceto vfethefer- 
uice of their ewne fubieel sin the warres. That 
in mans nature there is an ajfeclion breeding 
tyrannie, -which hinder eth the vfe and benefit 
oft he like moderatio n, 

». IIL 






6&S 
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of the fife Booke. 



f in. 

/foa? /£* bw« agmnfl the iMercimries 

Was diuerfiy manmged by Han no and A- 
milcar, with variable fuceeffe. The bloudie 
emnfailes of the Mercinarics ; and their finail 
detraction. 

\. mi. 

How the Mercinarics of the Carthagini- 
ans, that were in $zrc\\ma,rebelled:a*d were 
afterwards driuen out by the Jlanders. The^j 
faithlejje dealing of the Romans witbthe_j 
Carthaginians , in taking from them Sardi- 
nia, contrarie to the peace. 

$. V. 

Hew the affaires e/Carthagenwtf, be- 



tmetethe African Rebellion, andthefecond 
Punick VVarre. 

$. VI. 

The eftate efG recce from the death offyr- 
rhus, to the reigne ^Philip the fonne of 
Demetrius in Maccdon. 

$. VII. 

How the Illyrians tnfefted the coast of 
Greece ; end how they were fiibdued by the 
Romans. 

f VIII. 

Of the warrebetweenethe Romans<J»i 
Gaulcs , jomewhat before the comtning of 
Hannibal into Italic 



CHAP. III. 

Ofthefecond Punick VVarre, 



THe wanes of Hannibal in Spaine. 
Quarrells betweene the Romans and 
Carthaginians. Hannibal befiegeth 
andtakethSagnntvm^whileftthe Romans 
are buficd with the Iilyrians. IVarre proclai- 
med betweene Rome and Carthage. 

*. II. 

Hannibal takes order for the defence of 
Spaine and Africk. His ieurnieinto Italic. 

\. III. 

' How the R omans in vaine foi'icited the 
Spaniards and Gaules to take their part. 
Thetebcllionoftbe Cilalpine Ga\i\cs againjl 
the Romans. 

$. mi. 

Scipio the Roman Conful oner-come by 
Hannibal, at Ticinum. Beth of the Ro- 
man Cenfuls beaten by Hannibal, in a great 
battaileat Trebia. 

*V. 

The departure 0/Hannibal from the Ci- 
falpine Gaules into Hetruria. Flaminius 
the Roman Conful flaine ; and his Armies 
de/lroyedbytheCarthagmhns, at the Lake 
i^Thralymen. 



$. VI. 

How Q-Fabh is , the R.oman Ditfattr] 
fought to conjume the force of Hannibal , by 
lingring wane- Minutius, tbeiMzfler of 
the Horfe, honored and aduancedby the Peo- 
ple , for bold <ind fuceeffe full attempting , ad- 
ventures ra/hly vponHmnibal: and is like_j 
to perifh with his Armie, but ref cued by Fa- 
bius. 

$. VII. 

The Roman People ,deftreus to frnifj the 
warre quickly <, chooje arafl) andvnwortbie_j 
Conful. Great forces leuied againfl Hanni- 
bal. Hannibal taketb the Romans proai/I- 
ons in the CaflleofCannx. The new Confuls 
fet forth agninft Hannibal. 

\. VIII. 

Diffenlren betweenc the twRoman Con- 
fuls. Whether it belikely, that Hannibal was 
zf on point of flying out of Italic , when the 
Romans preffedhim to fight. The great bah 
tailest Cannae. 

$. IX. 

of things following the btttaile at Cari- 
na;. 

$. X. 
Of the great fuptly that Was decreed at 
Carthage 



't* 



•Mr 



The Contents 



ill i 



I 



(I 



^ 





fe 




2S3 






. 


S9° 

■ 

3^S 



Carthage, tobefent to Hannibal in Italic. 
How by the malice of Hanno , andjloth or 
parfimonieofthe Carthaginians, thefuffly 
was too long deferred. That the riches of the 
Carthaginians grew f after , than of the_j 
Romans. Of Fabius and other old Roman 
Hiftoriansfaw partial! they were in their wri- 
tings. 

$. XI. 

Strange reports of the Roman viclories 
in Spaine, before Afdru ba! thefinne ofA- 
milcar followed thence his brother Hanni- 
bal into Italic. 

fc XII. 

The great troubles that Hannibal raifed 
in all quarters, to the Citie of Rome. Poft- 
humiusthe Roman General/, with his whole 
Armie,is /ItinebytheGauks. Philip King 
ff Mac; don enters into a League with Han- 
nibal, again/ the Romans. The Romans, 
toping with the *& tolians, w,j/k wane vp- 
on Philips Grcece.-W afterwards conclude 
a peace with him ; the better to intend their 
bufmeffe again ft the Carthaginians. 

$. XIII. 

Hew the Romans beganne to receuer their 
ftrenglhbydegrees.The noble affection of the 
Komzm,in relieuing the publike necefities 
of their Common-weale. 

$. XI J IE 

The Romans winne fome Townes back 
from Hannibal; Hannibal winnes Taren- 
tum. Thefiege of Capua. Two viclories of 
Hannibal. Theieurnie ^Hannibal to the 
gates tf/Romc. Capua taken by the Ro- 
mans. 

$. XV. 

How the Carthaginians , making a partie 
in Sardinia and Sicil, held Warreagainft the 
Romans in tlwfe /lands ; and were oner- 
come. 



*. XVI. 

How the warre pajfed betweene the Ro- 
mans 40^ Hannibal in Italic, from the ta- 
king of Capua to the great viclorie at Me- 
taurus. 

\. XVII. 

How P. Cornelius Scipio the Roman* 
made entire conquefc ^Spaine. 

t- I. 

TJOw the Carthaginians weredriuen by 
*- ■*• Scipio ,jrom the Continent into the lie 
«/Gades. 

f. II. 
Funeral! games held by Scipio. \^4 DueH 
betweene two Spanifh Princes. A Sgrefton 
concerning Duclis. 

t. III. 

ThelaHABs of Scipio nv Spaine. #« «- 
/»>w /<; Rome : w£«v hcuchofen Conful. 

$• XVIII. 

Scipio obtainesleaue tomakewarrein A- 
frick. Hit preparations. O/MafanifTa,^, 
«yw</ »*£ Scipio. 7fc *« *ga«j? 
AfdrubaUWSyphax. 

$. XIX. 

7&r Carthaginians defire Truces: and 
br take it. 

k- XX. 

In what fort Hannibal /pent the time af- 
ter the battade o/Metaurus. The doings of 
Mago*» Italic Hannibal and Mago cd. 
led out of Italic #<w M<? Romans were S- 
uerjly affecledby Hannibals departure. 

$. XXI. 
Hannibal w Africk prepares to fiaht 
mth Scipio j treats with him about peace in 
vame; loofeth abattailc at Nadagara; and 
per/wades ^Carthaginians* tfut -for peace: 
Of the peace granted from Rome to Car^ 
thage. 



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CHAP. 




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of the 6ft Booke. 



CHAP. Ill i. 

O/Philip the Father o/Per(eus, lying of Macedon ; 

his prfi Ms and Wane with the Romans, 

by xshom hee wasfub* 

dued. 




f I. 

"O* W.Romans grew acquainted 
in the Etui Countries, anddefiroiu 

• of wane there. The beginning of 
many Princes , with great U'trres, atonic 
time. The e^froJiam oner-runne Pelopon- 
ncfus. Philip md his Afociates nnkewarre 
againfl the t^tolims. alteration of tbe_j 
State in Sparta. The ^Etoiians invader 
Greece^ Macedon: and are invaded at 
home by Philip. 

$. II. 

How Philip wasmiffe-admfed by ill ' Coun- 
failors : who afterwards wrought ireafon a- 
gainB him ; and were iuflly punifhed. Hee 
tnuadeth the t/£toIians afecond time : and 
forceth them to fue for peace ; which is vran- 
tcdvntothem. 

\. III. 

Philip, at the perfwafwn of Demetrius 
PhariiB, enters into League with Hannibal 
againfl the Romans. The tenour ofthe^j 
League bePccccne Hannibal and Philip. 

$. mi. 

How Philip yeelded to his natural! ■vices, 
being therein frothed by Demetrius Pha- 
rius. His defire to tyrannize 'vpon the free 
States his affociates .-with the troubles into 
Which he thereby fell, wbilefi hee bore a part 
in tbefecondV unick Warre. Flee poyfo- 
neth Aratus : and growes hatefuU to thej 
Achasans. 

\- v. 

0/Phi!opoemen General! »f the Acha> 
ans : and Machanidas Tyrant ef Laceds- 
mon. A battaile belweer.e them , wherein 
Machanidas isfaine. 

$. VI. 

Philip hatting peace with Rome , and 
with all Greece , prepares againfl Alia. Of 
the Kwgs <?/ Pcrgamus, Cappadocia, Pon- 



tus , Paphlagonia , Bithynia i a»d their 
Lwnges. of the Galatians. 

i VII. 
TheTowne of Cms taken by Philip , at 
the injhnce of Pru Has KmgofBnhyn\a,a»d 
cruelly defrayed . By this and like acitons, 
Philip growes hatefuil to many of the_j 
Greekes : and is warred vpon by Attalus 
King of Pergnmus, and by the R hodians. 

$■ VIII. 

The Romans, after their Carthaginian 
warre , feeke matter of quarrell againfl Phi- 
lip. The Athenians, vpon flight caufe,prt- 
claime warre againfl Philip ; moited thereto 
by ktx.z\mwhom they flatter \ Philip wins 
diuersTownes : and wales peremptorie an- 
fwere to the Roman Embaffadour. Thefu- 
rieia refolution of the Abydeni. 

$. IX. 
The Romans decree warre againfl Phi- 
lip , and fend one of their Cenfuls into 
Greece, as itwerein defence of the Atheni- 
ans their Confederates. Howfoorethe Athe- 
nians were at this time , both m qualitie and 
eftatc. 

\. X. 
The TowneofCh'Ads in Euboea , taken 
and fackt by the Romans and their <^ffo- 
pates, that lay in Garrij 'on at Athens. Phi- 
lip attempteth to take Athens by furprift: 
r» afleth the Countrie about; and makes a iour- 
zwi»/i?Peloponncfuf. O/Nabis, theTy' 
rant fl/Lacedsemon , and his wife. Philip 
offers to make warre againfl Nabis/tfr the_j 
Achseans. He returneth heme through At- 
tica, which he jfoileth againe ; and prouides 
againfl his enemies. Some exploits of thc^j 
Romans. Diuers Princes ioyne with them. 
Great labouring to draw Mjf^Etolians into 
the warren. 

$. XI. 



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$. XI. 
T^ mtetingof Philip w//A f/?<? Romans, 
4»d shrmifhmg with them on his borders. 
rfevErolians invade his Dominions : and 
are beaten home. Some doings o/Attalus 
and the Roman fleet: 

$. XII. 

yillins //*f Roman Confulwaflesayearc 
tonoeffeSi. Wane of the Gaulcs in Italic 
An Embafsie of the Romans to Carthage, 
Mafanifla*»i Vermina. The Macedoni- 
an prepares for defence of his Kingdome : and 
T. Quintius Fhm'miasisfent again ft him. 

$. XIII. 

The Romans beginne tomakewarreby 
negotiation. 3T.Quimiusjj'«w« apaffige 



againfi Philip. ThelTalie wafted by Philip, 
the Romans, WiEtoIians. The Achxans 
forfakingthe Macedonian , take part with 
the Romans, ^t 'treatie of 'peace that was 
vaine. Philip dcliuers Argos to Nabis the 
Tyrant ; who prefently enters into Leagut_j 
■with the Romans. 

$. XIIII. 

The battaile at Cynofcephalse, wherein 
Philip wasvanquiflxedby T. Quintius. 

\. XV. 

T. Quintius/>2//jttf«/ »/'/£/<&<? s^ftolians, 
and grants truce vntoPhilip, withconditi- 
ossyvpon which the peace is ratified. Libertie 
proclaimedvnto the Greekes. The Romans 
quarrcllwith Antiochus. 



CHAP. V. 



7 he Wanes of the Romans mth Antiochus 
the (jreat-y and his Ad- 
herents. 



i. I. 

WHat Kings , of the races of 'Se- 
leucus and Ptolemie , reig- 
ned in ACi.iand vdgypt be- 
fore Antiochus the Great. 

$. II. 

The beginning of the great Antioch us his 
reigne. of Ptolemie Euergetes and Phi- 
lopator,/0«£w/ey£gypt. Warrebetweene 
Antiochus^W Philopator. TbercbcBon 
of Molo ; and Expedition e/Antiochus a- 
gainjt him . The recontinuance of Antio- 
. chus his i^gyptiar) ll'arre .-with the faffa- 
ges betwecne the two Kings : the vicJorte of 
Ptolemie ; and peace concluded. ofA- 
charus and his rebellion; his greatnejfe, and 
his fill. Antiochus his Expedition against 
the Parthians , Ba&rians, and Indians. 
Somewhat of the Kings reigning in In- 
dia, after the death of the Great Alexan- 
der. 



$. III. 

The lewd reigne o/Ptolemic Philopator 
in ^£gypt : mth the tragiceHend of his fa- 
vourites, when hee was dead. Antiochus 
prepares to wane on the yong child Ptole- 
mie Epiphanes, the feme of Philopator. 
His irrefolution, in preparing for diners wars 
at once. His voyage toward theHclkCpont. 
He/eekes to holdamitie with the Romans, 
■who make friendly fl,ew te him ; intending 
nenertheleffc to haul wane with him. His 
doings About the Hellefpont; which the_j 
Romans made the fir H ground ef their 
quarrel! to him. 

\. UlI. 

The Romans hold friendly correffondence 
with Antiochus, during their wane with 
Philip : after which they quanellwilh him. 
The doings of Hannibal at Carthage : 
whence hee is chaced by his enemies, and by 
the Romans. H 'is flight vnts the King An- 
tiochus. 



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tiochus. The j^£coluns mttrmurc against 
the Romans in Greece. The warre oftbe_j 
Romans W Acharans, withN-.ibis the-j 
Tyrant o/Laccdxm on. The departure of the 
Romans^/ of Greece. T.Quintiusfe 
Triumph. Pence denyedto Antiochus by the 
Romans, 

\. V. 

Of the long warres which the Romans had 
with the Gm\e%,ljgurhm,and Spaniards. 
of M. Porcius Cato. Iniuries done by Ma- 
fanifla to the Carthaginians ; thatfue to the 
Romans for justice in vaintt 

$. VI. 

7fei/£tolians labour to prouokc h.nx\o~ 
chus, Philip, WNabis,taB>,i?r<r upon the 
Romans $ by whome they hold tbemfelnes 
wronged and difgraced. Nabis befiegeth 
Gyithcum , and ivafleth fomt part of h- 
chara. The exact j/'f/Ztf/Philoposmen in ad- 
vantage of ground : whereby he vtteiiy van- 
/p/fo^ Nabis. Antiochus being denyed 
peace by the Romans, ioynes with the v£ to - 
lians. The */£tolians Jurprife Demetrias; 
and, by killing Nabis their Confederate,feife 
if on Sparta. But they are driuen out by the 
Citizens: who at Philopoemen hisperfwa- 
fwns annexe themfelues to the Acharans. 

£. VII. 

Antiochus,^//»,j^^ Thoas the^E- 
tolian, comes otter into Greece, ilt attended. 
Stmdrie paffages betweene him , the i/£toli- 
ans, Chalcidians, and others. Heewinnes 
Cha\eh,indtherby the whole lie ^/Lubcea. 
The vanitie of the Kings EmbaJJadours , and 
//•""txEtolians : with the ciuile anfver of 'Ti- 
tus to their difcourfe, before the Acbjeans. 
That it concerned the Greeks A? bane defired 
peace, between the Romans and Antiochus: 
as the befl affurance of their ossne libertie. Of 
mtnypettie Estates that fell to the King. Of 



Aminander : and an idle vanitie , by which 
King Philip was loft. Hannibal giues good 
counfaile in vaine. Some Towneswonnein 
Theflalic. The King retires to Chalcis : 
where he marie tb ayong wife, and reuels away 
the reft of the Winter, vpon the camming of 
theKommCenfitl, all for fake Antiochus. 
Hee with two tboufend lAztolhns keepes the 
Streights of Thermopylae. He is beatcn,dnd 
flies into A fia •• leaning all in Greece vnto the 
Viftors. 

$. VIII. 

Lucius Sripio, baiting with IxmT'ubttus 
the African his elder brother, for his Lieiitc ■ 
nam , is Jent into Greece. Bee graunts long 
Truce to the ^Etolians, thxtfo hee might at 
leifurepaffeinto Afia. Much troublefome bit- 
finejfc by Sea : and diners fights. An invafien 
vpon Eumencs his Kingdom: -.with theficge 
of Pergamus, raifedby an h an df till of the A- 
cba;ins. L.ScipiotheConfdcomesinto A- 
fia : where Antiochus mofl earncflly defireth 
peace, and is deny edit. The battatle 0/Tvlag- 
ncfia : wherein Antiochus, being vanquifb- 
cd.yeeldeth to the Romans good pleafure-j. 
The conditions of the peace. In whit fort the 
Romans vfed their -victorie. L.Cornelius 
Scipio, after a moBfumptuotisTrmmpb oner 
Antiochus^'yaraiWiThcAfiaticjue,^ 
his brother was [tiled The African. 

\. IX. 

The is£tolhns , and the Gailo-grcekeSj 
vautjuifhedby/he Roman G«/«/.fFuluius 
WManlius .Manlius hardly obtaines aTri- 
itmph : beingch.vred ( among other objecti- 
ons J with attepting to hauepaffedthe bounds 
appointed. u fatallto the Romans by Sibyl. 
Of 'Sibyls Prophecies : the books of 'Hermes: 
andthit Infcription Simon i Deo San. 
cto. The ingratitude of Home to tbetwa 
Scipio's; and that beginning of facjioit a~ 
monglheKomMA'obilitie, 



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CHAP. VI. 

Thejecond Macedonian Wants. 



k I- 

T£fc condition wherein thofe Princes 
and Ejlates remained, which wer is 
A(focutes of the Romans, when the 
warrewifh Anxiochmwos finifhed. Thes 
Romans quarrell with Philip. They deale 
mfolentlywith the Acharans. TfeMaccdo- 
nian,being vnreadiefor warre,obtaines peace 
at Rome by his finne Demetrius ; of whom 
thenceforth he becomes iealous. 
■ }.■ II. 
The death of Philopcemen, Hannibal, 
WScipio. That the militarie profefiion is 
ef all other the mofl vnhappie : notwithfian- 
dingfome exaniples,whichmay feemetoprouc 
the contrarie. 

Philip making prouifion for mrrcagainft 
the Romans, deales hardly with many of his 
owne fubtecls. His negotiationwith the Ba- 
ftarnar. His crueltie. He'fiifiecJeth hisfonne 
Demetrius. Demetrius accufedby his bro- 
ther Pcrfcus ; and fbortly after fiaine, by his 
fathers appointment. Philip repenteth htm of 
his fnnes death, whom heefindeth to hancs 
beene innocent : and intending to reuenge it 
on Pcrfcus, he dieth. 

$. IIII. 
How the Baftarnar fe.'lvpm Dardania. 
The behauiour ofPcrCcu s in the beginning of 
hureigne. Some wanes of the\\omam : .and 
how they fiifiered Malanifth , cruelly to op- 
preJfetheCznbagmians.Theyquarre/lwith 
Pcrfcus. They allow not their Confederates 
to make wane without their leaue obtayncd. 
The treafon of Caliicrates ; whereby all I 
Greece became more obnoxious to Rome, 
than in former times. Further quarrells to 
Perfeus. Hefeeks friend/hip of the Acharans, 
andtswithftoodby Caliicrates. The Ro- 
mans difcouer their intent of warring vpon 
him. 

* V - 

How Eumencs King of Pcrgamus was 

bufied, with Pharnaces , the Rhodians and 
ethers. His hatred to the Macedonian.-B'/W? 
he acenfeth to the Roman Senate. The Se- 
nate honours him greatly , andcontemneshis 
Enemies the Rhodians ;with the caufesther- 
ef, ThevnvfuallflotitneffeoftheMacedo- 



nian Embaffadors. Perfeus his attempt vp- 
on Eumenes. The brotherly loue betweenes 
EumenesWAttalus. Perfeus/te deuice 
tepoifonfome ofthcKoman Senator s:wher- 
■upon they decree wane again (I him, and fend 
him defiance. Other things concerning the iu- 
Hiceofthtswarre. 

$. VI. 
The Komansfolicitthe Greekes toioynt 
with themin the wane again/} Perfeus. How 
the Greckcsfiood 'affecledin thatwarre.The 
timoroufnes of Perfeus. Martius,* Roman 
EmbaJJador deludes him with hope of peace. 
His forces. He takes the field; and winnes part 
ofThtMie.TheforcesofUcmmtheKo- 
man ConfuUandwhat afitftantsthe Romans 
hadinthiswarre. Of Tempcw ThefTalie; 
and what adutmtages ^Macedonian had 
or might hauehad,but left by his fear. Perfeus 
brines the Komms, fights with them,knows 
not how tovfe his vit~lorie,fues for peaces, 
and is deniedit by the vanquished. Pcrfcus, 
hatting the worfe in a skirmifbforfakes all the 
Countrie lying without Tempc.The Boeoti- 
ans releltigainftthe Romans, and are rigo* 
roufly f unified. The Roman Commanders 
unfortunate in the warre againfi Perfeus. 
They vex the Greeks theirfiiends;for whofe 
cafe the Senatemakesprottifion; hailing heard 
their complaints . The flattering Alaban- 
dcrs. 

f VII. 
QJvlartiiis the Roman C«nful,with ex- 
treme difficult^ & danger, enters into Tem- 
pe. The cowardice of Pcrfcus in abandoning 
Tcmpc. The Towne */Dium quitted by 
Martius , repaired and fortified by the King. 
The Romans attempt many places , with ill 
fucceffe. Their affaires in har deflate. Mar- 
tius a c mining and a bad man. Poly b\us fenl 
Embaf/ader to Martius from the Acharans. 
PolybiusA/j honeft wtfedome beneficiall to 
the Achxans. King Mumcr\c% growes auerfe 
from the Romans. Perfeus negotiates with 
Antiochus and Eumencs. Hisfalfe dealing 
witbGcmus King of Ulyria , whom hees 
drawesintothe Roman war. He fends Em- 
baffadors to the Rhodians , who vainly take 
vponthemto bee Arbitrators betweene Him 

and 



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and the Romans. Perfcus loofeth a migbtie 
fuccour of the Baftarnar,^ his wretched par- 
fmonie, 

\. VIII. 

0fL.JEmy\\mPaulus,tbe CenfuL His 
tour me. Heforccth Perfcus to difcampe. He 
mil not hazard bat talk with any dtfaduan- 
tage. Of anEclypfeof theCAloone. JEmy- 
]ius hisfuperftition. The battaile of Pydna. 
Pcrfeus his flight. He for fakes his Kingdom: 
which hafily yeelds to iy£mylius. Perfcil3 
at Samothrace. Hee yeelds himfelfeto the 
Roman Admiral!; and is fern frifoner to 
«x£mylius. 

$. IX. 

Gcntius King of the Ulyrians , taken 



by the Romans. 

$■ x. 

How the Romans behaued thcmfelues in 
Greece and Macedon , after their vicl one 
tf/wPerfeus. 

$. XL 

Thewarre of Antiochusi^ow^£gypr, 
brought to end by the Roman Embaffadors. 
\. XII. 

How the Romans were dreadfull to all 
Kings. Their demeanour towards Eumencs, 
Prulias, MafanifTa, and Cotys. Theendof 
Per/eus and his children. The inftabilitie of 
Kingly Eftates. The Triumphs ofVmlns, 
Anicius , and O&auius. With theConcltt- 
fion of the werke. 



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THE FIRST PART OF 

THE HISTORIE OF THE 

"VV orld:Intreating Of The 

Beginning, and firfl: ages of the fame, 

from the Creation ynto 

Abraham. 

THE FI\ST ZOOI^E. 

—i ' ■ 

Chap. I. 

Of the Creation j and Tre/er nation oftheWorid. 
\. I. 

That the imilfible Go A isfeene in his Creatures. 

O D, whomethe wifeft men acknowledge to 
beapowervneffable,andvcrtue infinite, alight 
by abundant clan tic inuiiible, an vnderftanding 
which it felfe can onely comprehend , an cflence 
eternall and fpirituall , of ablblute purenefle and 
fimplicitic,wasand is plcafcd to make himfelfe 
kno wne by the worke of the World : in the won- 
derfull magnitude whereof (all which he imbra- 
cetb, filleth, and fuftaineth) we behold the image 
of that glorie, which cannot bee meafured , and 
withall that one, and yet vniuerfill nature,which 
cannot be defined. In the glorious lights ofhea- 
ucn,wepcrceiueafhadow of his diuine counte- 
nance, in his mercifull prouifion for all that hue , his manifold goodneffe : and laftly, 
in creating and making exiftent the world vniucrfall by the abfolute art of his owne 
word, his power and almightinelTe, which power, light, vertue, wifedome,and good- 
nelTe, being all but attributes of one fimple eiTence , and one God , wee in all admire, 
and in part difcerne per Jpeculum cr eat ur arum, that is, in the difpofition, order, and va- 
rietic of celcftiall and terreftriall bodies : terreftriall, in their ftrangc and manifold di- 
ucrfities; celcftiall, in their beautie and magnitude; which in their continual! and con- 

B trary 




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The fir ft Bookie of the fir ft part Chap.i .§.z. 



Hugo fufet Ec 
tlef.Htm.if. 
Greg.in Mor. 
Hera, ad fit. 
Tit.l.'j.ymi.s 
•aero ingtitma, 
&iumapparcni 



neratoritm efi, 
mbUapparitio 
rjuiim gentratio 
lohn 5.3. 
T.7im.6.i6. 
Origcn. lib. t. 

cap. 11. cjril. 
& Chyfoft.in 
lobnHom.14. 
GregM/H-hz 



trade motions, arc neither repugnant, intermixt, nor confounded. By thelc"potent 
errects we approch to the knowledge of the omnipotent caufe, and by thefe motions 
their Almighriemoucr. ' 

In thefe more then wonderful! wotkes, God (faithjfcg*) fpeaketh vntoman.and 
It is true, that thc/e be thofe difcourfes of God, whofc effects all that liue wintciTe in 
themfelucs; the fenhble, in their fenfibfe natures; thereafonable, in theirreafonable 
Ionics: for according to S.Gregorie,Omvis homo eoipfe quod ration/is co»ditvse/t exip. 
H /a ratione, tfbm quife condsdit, Deum efe coltigere debet : £ucry man, in that he is rcafo- 
&mmmft r nable, out ofthe fame reafon may know,thathe which made him is God TKiVGorl * 
feSr *D '-nbehold (faith/rf > wh4 ,s according to the ^ W) Vo^LlZmt l0 
p«s,pcr omu, covfficere w creator* , to dijeerne Urn in his Providence by bis creatures. That GoH 
2&1&. ?* b f £CnC °*crwife feene, to wit^ith corpon.ll eyes,exceedeth the fmall propoT- 
nHbjwJy. "on of my vnderftandmg, grounded onthefeplaccsofS./«fe,andS./W Yeefriuc 
"*•* not heard ™ V01cc at an 7 "mc. neither haueyee feenehis Ihapc. And aeaine Whom 
neuermanfaw,norcanfee. . ' vv ' 

Andthislamfureagreethwith the nature of Gods fimplicitie, of which S o4&- 

oeuer name that .s to be called which is God, whatfoeuer that bee , the fame cannot 
be corporally perce.ued. And of this opinion were Origen, Cyrill, ChryfoHome, Grero- , j» 
^.„* v .>. ruNuzmum*, Hterome, Augujline, Gregorie the Great , EkmTiHs ?Alminw , via- ' 

S£ andbvtrlSle^r^ 3 ? ^ °t? f ""^ ¥ Butb ^ h,s owne '^ d ' 
A Ww.il ^ and b ^ ™* vi A h , blc T° rId ' Is ^° d P crccl "ed ofmen , which is alfo the vnderftood lan- 
y.Cre g .M« g «. guageorthc Almighue.vouchfafcd to allhiscreatures,whofeHicroglyphical Char. 
SfcSST f u ^ a ;"---"-bredS,arres,theSunne, and Moone, written ilfiS- 
AWu.«fc lumesofthehrmament: written alfo on the earth and the feas, by the letters of Si 
££?&* n-t/T 8 TT*' and « plantS > which inhablt and refide therein. Therefore 
£+»-*». wordvniuerfalhsnothing elfe but God exprcfl And the muifibfeX " o'frS 
£5-» g^S t .^arefeenebyc r ionof thewSld, be^conSK^tSf , 
Wfc*« Ofall which thercwasnoothercaufe preceding then his owne will noottrmir 3 

"2 s - tmc ' asbcbe ^ ldthe fi me '«alleternitieintheabundancekisowneloue fbw's 

««««» domcd,fpofcd,andbyh,sa!m,ghue P ower perfected, and made wfible. Andtherc- 
fore , (£uth^W«/«) wee : ought^oloueGodf.v^, &eXe feMh«, (thads) both 
Frfwadedbybs^rd^ 

aZAega. Wfi*" &gHbernm»r cbferuaUone & collatione, vel ex ipfi^ei ierbJ Forhe ^ 

*(* ofwhomethcre.snoh,ghcrcaufe,cannotbeeknowne by any knowledge ofcaufe or 4 

XSSk b 1ff^ «/^*0 butdtherby the ol^andeonfiS^^fff" 

»j?./rf. 7 . whlchhe hath,ordothcreateandgouerne,orelfebythewordofGodhimfelfe. 



J~cirelar l & Ml 
Dius omnium 
cjfc crederetur 



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Hctm.mVce. 
mandro & in 
firmmtfacrt. 




Tte ^ »//?/? c//^ K?4?fo», wbefe author hie is not to be defpifed, haite 

Acknswledgcdtbe world to haue beene created by ■ 

GOD. 

miStTl If,' tb9U g hb y diuer3te ™^andmadifferent 5 ° 

mane, C xprcfl,I mcanc all thofe who are entitled by S.Auruflir,, Summi 

arm Trfmrgtfa callcth God, Prwcipium vmmfarm, The originaU 

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of the vniucrfall ; to whom he giueth alio the attributes of Mens, natura, aclm, necef- 
fit.ts, finis, & rmouatio. And whereinhe truly , with S*. Paul, cafteth vpon God all 
power ; confeffing alfo , that the world was made by Gods almighty word , and not 
by hands : verba, nan mantbm,fabricalus til mundui. Zoroaster, (whom He ra- 
clitus followed in opinion) tooke the wordfire to exprefTe God by (as in Deuteronomy ncur.n. 14; 
and in S c .iWitisvfed) Omniacxvno ignegenitafunt, <^A"llthings (faith he) are can- mtr.1z.19 
fed or produced cut of one fire. 

So did Orpheus plainely teach, that the world had beginning in time,S-om the will 
ofthe moft high God ; whofe rcmarkeable wordesare thus conuerted. Cum abfeon- 

1 o dtffet omnia I v r 1 f e Kfiimmm , deinde in lumen gratumemipt , exfacro corde operans 
cogitata & mirabilia : Ofwhich I concciue this fenfe ; when great I v i> r t e k /W bid- 
den all things in himfelfe , working out of the loue of hit f acred heart , he fent thence or 
brought forth into gratefull light, the admirable workes which he hid forethought, 

Pindar in the Poet, and one of thewiftft, acknowledged alfb one God, the molt 
higlffto be the Father and Creator of all things ; Vvus Veus Pater Creator fummia. 
Plato calleth God the caufc and originall, the nature and reafbn of the vniuerfall , to- 
nus rerum mttmra,caufa, & origo Dens. But hereofmore at large hereafter. 

Now although the curiofity of fbme men haue found it luperfluous, to remember 
the opinions of Philofophcrs , in matters of Diuinity : (it being true that the Scrip- 

zo ture hath not want of any forraine teflimony) yet as the Fathers with others excel- 
lently learned are my examples herein; fb S c . Paul himfelfe did not defpife, but 
thought it lawfiill, and profitable,to remember whatfbeuer he found agrcable to the 
word of God, among the Heathen, that.hemight thereby take from them all efcape 
by way ofignorancc, God rendring vengeance to them, that know him not • as in his, 
Epiftlc to Titus he citcth Epimenides againft the Cretians, and to the Corinthians, Me* 
aandtr, and in thefeuentcenth ofthe Acts, Aratm, cjrc for Truth (faith S c . Ambrofe) 
bywhomfoeucrvttcred,isoftheho!yGhoft; Veritas a quociwfe dicatur , a fptritu 
fantto til : and laftly let thofe kindc of men learne this rule , Qu/fa-risferuixttt , pro^ 
phana nbn funt i 2{otbwg is prophage thatferueth to the vfe of holy things. 

30 



Vid-t if.fi 



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#' 



$. III. 

Of the meaning of In Principled 
Cenef.i, 1, 

1 His vifiblc world of which Mofes writcth , God created in the begin- 
\ ning, or firft of all : in which ( faith Tertullian ) things beganne to bee. 
This word beginning (in which the Hebrcxces fecke fbme hidden my- 
fteric , and which in the It vfes Tar gum is conuerted by the word Sapicit- 
» tin ) cannot be referred to fiicecffion of time, nor to order,as fbme men 
haue concerned , both which are fubfequent : but only to creation then. For before 
that beginning, there was neither primary matter to bee informed , nor forme to iiv 
forme, nor any being, but the etcrnall. Nature was not, nor the next parent of time 
begotten, time properly and naturally taken ; for if God had but diipofed of matter 
already in being, then as the word beginning could not bee referred to all things, fo 
muft it follow, that the inftitution of matter proceeded from a greater power then! 
thatofGod. And bywhat name (hall wcthencallfuchaone (faith Lattmiut )%s 
exceedeth God in potency : for it is an aft of more excellency to make , then to d i£ 
j pofe ofthings made : whereupon it may be concluded , that matter could not be be- 
fore this beginning : except we faine a double creation, or allow of two powers, and 
both infinite , the impoffibility whereof fcorneth defence. 7{J.m impojsibile plura cufm. dimem 
effi infinita : quoniam alter urn ejfet inalterofinitum^ Theniannot be more infinites then hb - J- 
ttte ; for one of them would limit the other. 

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tMerc er.ii Gen. 
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Cufui. ia com- 
pend.fol.1z4, 
Operis. 

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$. mi. 

Of the meaning of the words Heauen mA Earth. 
Genef.i. r. 

He vniuerfall matter of the world ( which Moyfes comprchendeth vn- 
der the names of Heauen and Earth) is by diuers diucrlly vnderftood ■ 
for there arethatconceiue, that by thofewordes, was meant the firft 
matter, as the Peripatetikes vndcrCnnd it, to which St.Auruftine and 
/Jidore feemc to adhere. Feciftimundum (faith S'.Auguftine) demote- 
na mformt, quamfecifti de nulla re,pene nullam rem : (that is) Thou halt made the world 
of 'atnatterwtthoutforme-.whichmatterthoumadefof nothing, and beinr made, it was 
little other then nothing. * 

But this potential! and imaginary materia prima cannot exift without forme. Te< 
ter Lombard, theSchoole-men, Beda, Lyranus, Come for, Tofatm and othcrs,affirme,that 
upleafed God firft of all to create the Empyrean Heauen : which at the fucceeding 
mitant (faiths and sm^; hee filled with Angels. This Empyrean Heauen 
SteucbiutEugubiituiatiX&hDmnecUritie, and vncreated: an erronr, for which'heis 
lharply charged by Pererimjhough (as I conceiue)herather failed in thefubfequent id 
when he madeit to be a place and the feate of Angels, and iuft Soules,then in the for- - 
mer affirmation : for ofthe firft, That God liueth in eternall light, it is written- our 
Joule praife thou the Lord, thatcouereth himfelfe with light : and in the Reuelation And 
fheatjhathnoneedeofSunne,neitheroftheLMoonetojhineinit -.for the rloryofGod 
tbd light it. And herein alfo John Mercer vpon Gene/is diffcrcth not in opinion from 

£«g«W:forasbyhe a uencreatedinthebeginning,wasnotmcanttheinuifibleor 
fuperccleft,all,fb m his lodgement , becaufe it was in all eternity theglorious feate of 
God himfelfe it was not neceflary to be created ; Qucm mundum Jupercdeficm mec 
tudiciocrearilimhMaccx)noneratneceJfe. 

But as Mofes forbore to fpeake of Angels, and ofthings inuifiblc, and incorporate, 
fortheweakcneffeofthc,rcapacities,whomhethen cared toinformeofthofo things 

wh.chweremoreman,fcft (to wit) that God did notonlybyaftrong hand deliuer 
themfromthe bondage of <ALgypt according to his promife made to their forefa- 
thers .but alfo that he created, and was the fole cau£- of this afpeaable,and perceiue- 
ableynmerfaljfoontheotherfideldaireflotte^^^ 

orwhatfoeuerelfr(nothimfeffe)wasincreateandeternal:andarforthcplaccofGod 
before the world created, the finite wifedome ofmortall men hath r^SSic^T" 
it, neither can ,t limit the feate of infinite power, no more then infinite powent felfe 
can bchrmted : forh.splace.s in himfelfe, whom no magnitude clfe can containe- • 
HowgreatutbehoufeofGoa f ( faith Baruch ) how large U the place of hUpoJfefsions, ** 40 
great,andhathnoend,itishighandvnmeafurable. JJ 4 

Butieauingmultiplicityofopinion,itismorcprobableandallowed,thatbvthe 

wordes,^»^W£^,Avasmelntthefolidmatterandfubftance > afwellofaIjthc 
Heauens, and Orbes fupernall, as ofthe Globeof the Earth and Waters ^^t^d 

Zf/ 0U ^ { u°u k) at rr^ I ma " erofa11 c „ hin g s i materia, chaos , po/tbilttas, fine, 
fofefm. Which matter (lath Caluin) was fo called, quodtotiwmundifemen fuerit ; 
Becaufe ,t was thefeede oftk Vniuerfall, an opinion of ancient Philosophers long 



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$. V. 

Th.it thefubflance of the waters, as mixt in the body of the earth, is by Mofes vnd:r~ 
floodlit the word Earth : and that the Earth, by the attributes ofvnformcd 
and wide, is defcribedas the chaos of the an- 
cient Heathen. 



O s e s firft nameth Heauen and Earth (putting waters but in the third 
place) as comprehending waters in the word Earth, but afterwards 
hee nameth them apart, when God by his fpirit beganne to diftinguiih 
the confufed Maffe, and (as Bafd faith) pr.tpararc naturam aqu.i adfee- 
cunditatem vitalem; to prepare the nature of water to a vital! fruitfulnejfe. 
For vndcr the word Heauen, was the matter of all hcaucnly bodies, and natures 
expreft : and by the name of Earth andtVaters, all was meant,whatfoeuer is vnder the 
Moone, and fubieft to alteration. Corrupt feedes bring forth corrupt plants ; to 
which the pure heauens are not fubiect , though fubiect to pcriming. They frail pe- P/iTJoi. is. 
rift} (faith Dauid) and theheauens fihtli vanity away like fmoke faith Efay. Neither uja.ii. 
10 were the waters the matter ofEarth: for it is written. Let the waters vnder the be*- G«, t . *«/•,' 
uens be gathered into one place, and let the dry landappeare : which proueth that the dry 
land was mixt and couered with the waters, and not yetdiflinguifhed; but no way, 
that the waters were the matter or feede of the Earth , much lefle of the Vniuerfad. 
Initio ta Domim terramfundafti, Thou,0 Lord, in the beginning haft founded the Earth : 
and againe, The Earth was couered with the Deepe (meaning with waters) aswith a gar- PftUo^s, 
went , faith Daaid. And if by n aturall arguments it may bee proued , that water by 
condenfation may become earth, the fame reafon teachcth vs alio, that earth rarificd 
may become water: water, aire .-aire, fire; and fo on the contrary, Detts frnis fub- zoo. 
ftantiamper air em inaqitam comcrtit, Godturneth the fub fiance of fire, by aire, into wa- 
3 ter. For the Heauens and the Earth remained in the fame- flate , in which they were 
created,as touching their fubftance, though there was afterwards added multiplicitie 
of perfection, in refpeft of beauty and ornament. Caelum veto & terra in flitu, crea- Gzl. Tariff 
tionis remmferunt, quantum ad fubftantum , licit multiple xperfeftio decoris ejr ornatus 
eis poflmodiimfuperaddita eft. And the word which the Hebrcwcs call tMaim , is not 
to be vnderftood according to the Latme tranflation (imply, and as fpecificall water; ■ 
but the fame more properly fignirieth liquorFor (according to CVwntamis) Eflautem a. Hunt, denm. 
Maim liquor geminm, & huic itomen propter verborumpemtriam, Latin a lingua plurah 
ftamero aquas fecit. For Maim (fi iithhe) is a double liquor, (that is , of diners natures) 
and this name or word the Latines wanting a voice to exfrefje it. call it in the Plural, Aquas, 
'40 Waters. 

This Maffe, or indigefted matter, or Chaos created in the beginning was without 
forme , that is , without the proper forme, which itaftenvards acquired , when the 
Spirit of God had fcparated the Earth, and digefted it from the waters : And the earth Gwf.i. », 
was voick : that is, not producing any creatures, or adorned with any plants, ffuits,or 
flowers. But'dhertbc Spirit of God badmoucdvponthewaters , and wrought this indi- rj 
gefted matter into that forme, which it now retayncth , then did the earth budde forth 
thehearbe, which feedeth feede , & the frttitfull tree according to his kinde , andGodfaw 
that it was good; which attribute was notgiuentothe Earth , whileitwas confufed, 
- nor to the Heauens, before they had motion, and adornement. God f aw that it was 
5 o good ; that is, made perfect : for perfection is that , to which nothing is wanting. Ef 
ferfecli Dei pcrfettafunt opera , Thcworkes of the perfect God, are f'erfecl, 

From this lumpe of imperfect matter had the ancient Poets their munition' ofZV- 
mogorgon : Hesiodvs and A n a x h o r. a s the knowledge of that Chaos , of 
which Ouid: 

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Oaid.Metam. 
Ub.i. 



t^fnte mare , & terras , & (quodtegit omnia J ccelnm, 
Vnus erat toto nature vultusin Or be, 
Quern dixere Chaos, rudis indigefiaj s moles. 

Before the Sea and Land was made , and Heaucn, that all doth hide, 
In all the world one only face of naturedid abide ; 
Which Chaos hight, a huge rudeheape. 



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$. VI. 

How it is to be vnderfioodthat the Spirit ofGodmoaedvpon the waters, and that > 

this is not tobefearcbed curioufiy.^ 

Fter the creation of Hcauen and Earth, then voide and without forme, 

the Spirit of God moiied vpon the waters. The Seuenty Interpreters vfe 

the word fuper-ferebatur , mouedvponorouer : incubabat, or fouebat 

(faith Hierome) out of Ba/il; and Bafd out of a Syrian Doctor; Equidem 

nonmeam tibi , fed virt cuiufdam Syri fenlentiam recenfebo ( faith ftj/?/) 

v/hkhwordes incubarc or fouerc importing warmth, hatching, or quickning, haue a 2a 

fpeciall liking. Verbum tranfatum efl ab autbuspulliticifna incubantibus, quimuis ftiri- 

tuali,& plane inenarrabili,non auiem eorporali modo; The wot dis taken of birds hatching 

their yong, not corporally, but in ajpirituall andvnexprefsible manner. 

Some of the Hebrewes conuert it to this effect, Spiritus Dei volitabat, The Spirit of 
Cod did flutter : the Chaldaran Paraphraftin this fenfe, ventm a confpecltt Dei fuffiibat, 
or as other vnderftand the ChiddxHn,fiabat,pe/lebat,remouebat: the windefiom the face 
of God did blow vnder, driue, or remoue, or did blow vpon, according to the 1 4 7. P falme. >-/ /■ /£ 
He caufed his winds to How , and the waters increafe : but there was yet no winde nor exha- 
Mik.vtfy. lotion : ^inas CMontanus in thefe wOrdes, Etfpiritus Elohim Meracbefct, id efl, effica- 

• citer motitans, tenfouens, ac agitamfuperfacicsgemini liquoris ; The Spirit of Godeffe- ? 
clually and often matting , keeping warme, andchcrijhing, quickning and fining vpon 
the face of this double liquor. For he maketh foure originals, whereofthree arc agents, 
'Hr.Mmtjenn. and theMpaflmeandmateriall,to wit, cauft, which is the diuine goodneffe, lehi, 
uu,^ M9 . yMc\\h,fiat,fiueerit, letitbe, oritfballbe. Qu* vox verboDeiprimaprolata fait: 
xchichvoke (faithhe) was the firfi that was vttered by the wordofGod. Thethird Spi- 
rit us Elohim, the Spirit of God, id eft, vis qutdam diuina, agilis ac prxfens per omnia per* 
tingens,ommacompkns, that is, a certaine diuine power, or flrength euery where , acliue 
andextending,and(lrctcbingtbroughalI,pllingandfinifyingallthi)?gs. The fourth he 
calkthtJWaim,id eft, materiel adomnem remconficiendawhabilis ; matter apt to become 
euery thing. For my felfe I am refblued (Cum Deus fit fuperrationale omni ratione , See- 40 
ingGodu in aUreafon abouereafon) that although the effects which follow his won- 
derfull wayes ofworking,may in a meafurc be perceiued by mans vnderftanding,yet 
the manner and firft operation of his diuine power cannot bee conceiued by any 
minde, or fpirit, compaffed with a mortall body. Animalvs homo qmt Dei fimt non - 
percipit : For my thoughts (faith the Lord in Efay) are not your thoughts , neither are your 
wayes my wayes. AndastheworldhathnotknowneGodhimfelfe : fb are his wayes 
( according to S c . Paul) paft finding cut. O righteous Father, the world hath not knowne 
thee, &hh cbriti . And therefore, whether that motion,vitalityand_Qpiaatfon,were 
by incubatibn,6r how elfj^themanner i s onlyToT Owne to GoSfquemodo in omniFus fit 
rebus, velperejfentiam, velperpotentiam,intelieclus nojlernon capit ;For how God(lhith jo 
S*.AuguJline, fpeaking of his Vbiquitie) is in aH things , either by e fence , pre fence , or 



,9-if 



BfyvX 



Aug. Tratt.lo, 



" - power, our vnder ftanding cannot comprehend. 2{jhil inter -Denmhominem^ diHaret,(i 

laZLm-Pufat. confilia, &AifpofitionesiUius mateflatis aternaz, cogitatio affequeretur human* : There 

pould be no difference betweene God and Man, if mans vnderftmding could conceive the 

counjels. 







0> 



H A VJ.§.6. 

'ounfels a. 



ef the Htftorie oftbs World. 



_ 



"7 

/ 



y^r^v^t Vl 



counjels and difppfin g of that cterndl Maiefly, and therefore to be ojier-curious in 
fearching how the ail-powcrfull Word of God wrought in the creation of the world, 
or his all-piercing and operatiue Spirit diitinguiiinng.gaue forme to the mattcrof 'the 
Vniuerfill, is a labour and fearchlike vnto his, who not contented with a knowne 
and fife focrd, will prefumc to paffe oucr the greateft Riucr in ail parts , where hce is 
ignorant oftheir depths: for fo doth the one Ioofc his life, and the other his vndfiEr 
{landing. We behold the Sunnc, and enioy his light, as long as we looke towards it 
but tenderly, and circumfpeclly : we warmc our felucs fifely , while wee ftand ncare 
the fire ; but if we f eeke to outface the one, or enter into the other, we forthwith be- 
xo come blinde or burnt. 

Buttoefchcwcuriofity:thisistrue,thattheEngliihword (moued) is moftpro- 
pcrandfignificant : for of motion proceedeth all production, and all whatfoeueris 
effected. And this omnipotent Spirit of God, which may indeede bee truely called 
Trincipiummotus , and with Mirandtda , vis titufe efficients , 'the force of the efficient 
caufe, S c .^^«/?/wlbmetimestakethfortheholyGhofl:;.fomctimc for a winde or 
breath, fob nomine fpiritus, vnder the name ofafpirit , which is fbmetimes fo taken : 
or for virtudis or eat urn., for a created virtudity : Tertallian and Theodoret call it alio ti 
breath or winde : Mercuries nameth it Spirit urn tenuem intclligibilem,apurt or thinne 
intelligible fpirit : Anaxagoras, mentem .- Tostatvs, voluntatem <jr mentem 
ao Dei, The will and minde of 'God; which Mens , Plato inTim£o,rrakcth animam rnundi, 
The Joule of theworld: and in his fixt Booke «!?X^//£/,?Mhecallcthit thelawofiHeauen; 
in his Epiftlcs , the leader of things to come , and theprcfence of things past. But as Cy^ ' 
friau wrote ofthc Incarnation of Chrift our Sauiour, Mens deficit , vox filet , cjrnoi* 
mea tantiim,fedetiam AngcUrum : My minde fadeth,my voice ufdent, and not mine only, 
•butcuen the voice of Angels : Co may all men elf e fay in the vnderftanding,and vtterance 
ofthewayes and workes of the Creation ; for to him (faith 'Njiz.ian&enus) there is 
not one f iibfhnce by which he is, and an other, by which he can, Sedconfiubftantiale illi M^nM,^ 
eft quicquideim eJt,& qutcquideft, whatfioeucr attribute of himthsreu , andwhatfeeuer "'•s 
be is, it is the very famefubftance that himfelfe is. 
'5 o But the Spirit of God which moued vpon the waters,cannot be taken for a breath 
or winde, nor for any other creature, feparate from the infinite ac'thie power of God, 
which then formed and diftinguifhed, and which now fuftaineth , and giucth conti- 
nuance to the Vniucrfall. For the Spirit of the Lord fillcth all the world ;_and the 
famcisit,whichmaintaynethal/things, laith Salomon, if thottfend forth thy Spirit 
<fiith David) they are created: And G k. e g o s. i e, Vevsfuopnfentidi effe,dat omni- 
bus rebm effe, it a quod, fife rebus fubtraheret,ficut de nihilo facia font omnia, fie in nihi- 
lum defluerent vniuerfa ; Codgiueth being t$ all things , by being prefent with dl things, 
foas,ifhe$hould withdraw himfelfe from them, then as of nothing the world was made , it 
would againefaf! away, andvamfl) into sothing. And this workingof Gods Spirit inall 
r ^o things, Virgil hath cxpreft excellently. 



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Trincipio tothm ac terras, eampof£ liquenteSf 
Lucentemtj t globurn Lung, Titania^ aHrt, 
Spiritus intus dtt : totantfy infufa per arnts, 
OHens agitat molem, & magna fe eorpore tnifc(K 

Thehcauen,theearth,andall the liquid mayne, 
The Moones bright Globe, and Starres Titanian, 
A Spirit within maintaines: and theirwhole Maile, 
A Minde, which through each part infus'd doth pafle> 
59 Fafhions, and workes, and wholly doth tranfbierce 

All this great body of the Vniuerfe. 

And this was the fame Spirit, which moued in the Vniuerfall, arid thereby both 
diftinguifhed and adorned it. Hk Spirit hath gwm&d the hwtens ; faith lob. So ub c. 16. v, ij. 

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then the Spirit of God moucd vpon the waters, and created in them their fpirituali- 
ty, and naturall motion ; rriotionbrough^fonhj^ heat rarifaclion, and fub- 
ttlity ofparts. By t his Spirit, (which gau gjieatand moTionTana^i erer^ operation 
toeuery nature, while it moucd vpon the waters, which were in one indigefted 
lumpc, and Chaos, dilpofedtoallformcsalike) was begotten aire : an element, ib- 
pcrior, aslighterthenthcwaters,throughwhofevaft, open, fubtile,diaphanicke, 
or tranlparcnt body, the light afterwards created might eaiily tranfpicrce : light' 
for the excellency thereof, being the firft creature which God called good , whole 
creation immediately followed. This Spirit cbryfoflome caileth a vitall Operation, 
utquis a Deo in fit urn, ex qua aqu.t nonfoltim motionem, fed & vimprocreandi animalia hi 
bUerint. He caileth it k vitall Operation giuen by Cod vnto the water sjxbereby the venters 
had not only motion, but alfo power to procreate or bring forth limn? creatures. 



ID. 



tuX dicituf,q:lis 
fe, & omnia vi~ 
Jibilmficit, Cu- 
fan. in Commend. 
caii.7.&cxcr(i{. 



Tic'm.libJetn- 
mmt. f<y.;i. 



fic.defrtK 



$. VII. 

Ofthe light created, as themateriallfiibflance of the Sunne -.and of the nature 

of it, and difficulty of knowledge of it : and ofthe excellency and vfc of 

it -.andof motion, andheat annexedvntoit. 

. ~ ~ '-'■' Hcfewaters were afterwards congregated,and called the Sea : and this -xo 
I light afterwards (in the fourth day)gathered and vnited.and called the 
™ Sunne, the Organ, and inftrument ofcrcated light. For this ftrft and 
difperfed light did not (as I concciue) diftinguiih thenight from the 
day,but with a reference to theSunnescrcation,and the vnitincr ofthe 
difperfed light therein. This is proucd by rhefe wordes, Let there be lights in the fir- 
menu tofeparate the day from the night : which lights in the firmament of heauen were 
alfo made for fignes, and for feafons, and fbrdayes, and for yeares, implying a mo- 
tion mftantly to follow , by which dayes and yeares are diftinguiihed ; after which 
fucccedcd Tirne^ or together with which , that T ime ( which was the meafure of ' 
motion) began. For that fpace ofthe firft threedayes which preceded the Suns crca- , 
tion, or forrnall perfection , when as yet there was not any motion to be rneafured ' 
and the day named in the fift verfe,was but fuch a fpace,as afterwards by the Sunnes 
motion made a ciuill ornaturall day. And as Waters werethe matterofaire, ofthe 
firmament, and ofthe lower and vpper waters , and ofthe leas , and creatures' there- 
in .-Earth, the matter of Beafts, plants, minerals, and mans bodv : fo may light (for 
expreffion fake) be called the Chaos, or materiall fubftancc ofthe Sunne , and other 
lights of heauen. Howbeit neither the Sunn^nomry thing fenfible, is that light it 
felfe, qua caufa cfl lucidorum,which is the caufe that things are lightfome (though it make 
it felfe and all things elfe viliblc) but a body moft illightned , which illumina teth the 
Moonc, by whom the neighbouring Region ( which the Creekes call ^Ethtr , the 40 
place of the fuppofed Element of fire) is affected and qualified , and by it all bodies 
liuing in this our aire. For this light Auicenna caileth vehhulum & foment urn ommnm 
tcelefiium virtutum, & imprefsionum : the conducler, andpreferuer, or nof-trijher ofallce- 
leftiall vertues and imprefsions, nothing defending of hcaucnly influenres,but by the 
medium, or meancs of light. Arifiotle caileth light, a quality, inhcrcnt,or clcauing to 
a Diaphanous body, Lumen esl qualitas inhxrens Diaphano : but-this may be better a- 
uouchedof the heat, which it tranfporteth and bringeth with it, or conduftcth- 
which heat (fay the Platonicks) abeunte limine refidet infubiecio, the light bein? depar- 
ted doth refide w the fubiefl , as warmth in the aire , though the fame" be depriued of 
light. This he,htPlotwm and all the Academikes make mcorporall,and Co doth Mon, 50 
t a n v s, Cm nee duritia refiflii, netjpatiam : which neither hardneffe refifleth, nor fpace 

Artflotle findeth corporalitie in the beames oflight ; but it is but by way of rcpe- 
£y?9 ?5 J^ mens opjnions,faith Ptulmvmi^otritm^afpw^ Epicurus, ■ 

giue 



CK 



















v4 



fi- 



Chap, j.§.j. of the Hi/ione of the World. 



giue matcmlity to hght it felfe but improperly : for it pafTcth at an mftant,from the 
heauen Wthecarth norisitrefifted by anyhardneffe, becaufe it picrcetb through 
thefohd body of glallc, or other Criftalline matter; and whereas it is withftoodby 
yncleanc arte Ivnpurc earthy mbftances, lcffe hard and moreeafic to inuade then the 
former, theiamcis, Quodobftacuhm, naturaterreumatgjordtdaw, nonumunMtm 

C ^{%i k : !l M "! g r t0 'S^BSftdianc light, whjgWlyfoinethon t&ofi 

miixie^which are purged from all worldly drofle, and humane vnclcanncfle 

but of this created light,thereis no agreement in opinion : neither doe I maruaile 

• io atit^oritcannotbefounde«therintheFathers,Philofophers, or Schoole-men , or 
^eranciento^^ 

heremralmen (to caft off ignorance) hauedifputed hereof, but there is no man 
that hath becne taught thereby. Thomas Aquino* (not jnf eriour to any b* W h) 7s te 
hath fhewed Lttlcftrength ofargument in refuting the opinions of Bed,, mJ,i om , 
bard, Ljyanm , and others : fo is his owne Judgement herein , as weake as any mans • 
and moft of the Schoole-men were rather curious in the nature oftermes , and more 
lubtilein diftinguifiiing vpon the parts of docfrine already laid downe, then difcoue- 
rers oiany thing hidden, either in Philofophic or Diuimty : of whome it may be tru- 
. ly laid , ■Njhilfi.pknPis olofius Acumine mmio : Nothing it more odiom to true wtfdome 
20 then too M ute\)MrpneJfe. Neither hath the length of timc,and the fearch ofmany lear- 
ned men (which thefame time hath brought forth and deuourcd) refolued vs,whc- 
thcrthi S lightbe/ubftantiall,corporall, onncorporall : Corporall they fayit cannot 
be, becaufe then it could neither pierce the aire, northofehard, folid, and Diapha- 
nous bodies which it doth,andyet cuery day we fee the aire illightencd : incorporall 
it cannot be,becaufe it is fenfible : fenfible it is,becaufc it fomctime affetttth the fight 
■ of the eye with offence, and therefore by moft of the Fathers fo efteemed : others fay 
(as ntrmm )thzt it cannot be matter , becaufe no forme fo excellent as it felfe to in- 
. forme it: neither can it be any accident, which is notfeparable without the defini- 
tion of the fubieft : for light being taken from the Sunne , the Sunnc is no more the 
30 Sunnem exiftcnce. Secondly, ifiight were proceeding from mattcrand fbrme,thcn 
either, or both muft be one o'fthefe, Lucide or bright, darke or opake , Diaphanous 
ortnmfparent; but darkeneffe cannot be parent of light; and things Diaphanous 
(being neither light, nordarkenefle, butcapable of either) cannot be thecaufeof ei- 
ther and therefore muft the matter,or fbrme,or both,be Lucide and ihining. Lucide 
and ihining obtayne their fo being ofthe light, and therefore, if wcdcrmethis being 
of light from a former, then would the progrefTe goe on infinitely, and againft na- 
ture; and therefore he concludeth that light in the Sunne hath his being primarily 
^ and immediately of it felfe, and is therefore the Sunnes forme , and the forme of all 
1" Lucideand ihining bodies : but what is taught hereby, let others iudae. 
40 But in my vnderftanding, lumen, (which may be Engliihed by the word Shine) is 
an mtcntionall Species of that, which may be Englifhed by Light, andfo, this ihi- 
ning which procecdeth from the Sunnc, or other lights of hcauen, or from any other 
light,is an image,or intentionall Species thereof; and an intentionall Species may be 
vnderftood by the example ofaredde, or greene colour, occafioncd by the Ihining 
of the Sunne through reddeorgrceneglafre.-forthen wee perceiuc the fame colour 
caft vpon any thing oppofite ; which redneffe or other colour we call the intentionall 
Species of the colour in that glaffe. And againe, as this light, touching his fimplc na- 
y ture, is no way yet vnderftood : fo it is difputed,whcther this light firft created be the 
fame, which the Sunne inholdeth and cafteth forth , or whether it had continuance 
50 any longer, then till the Sunnes creation. 

Butbythcmoftwifeandvnchanged order, which Godobferuedintheworkeof 
the world, I gather, that the light, in the firft day created, wasthefubftance ofthe 
Sunne • for Mofes repeateth twiie the maine parts ofthe vniuer/all ; firft,as they were 
created in matter; fecondly, as they were adorned with forme : firft, namingthc 

Heauens ? 



Fiona: 



*■)'■ ' 



i>f> 



<z7 



^p6 



ti%& id 



■y 






t* 



Lucidn corpors 
(unt (Una fua. 
luce, alimh te.- 
nebris uafmas 
Ofnca funt plel 
no. fuh Uncbrii 
alkm lit/nine. 
Traijp.7rer.tix 
fin Diaplwia 
carentfuis&lit, 
mme&tatebrisi 
dicnis ir lnr,n~ 
ne <*■ tcnebris 
yermemtur. 

Scal.fubt.cx.il, 



Gcntf. s, 
Ver{. ifc 



% 



4 



IO 



Thefrft Hoc/kg of the fr {I part C h a p. 1*^.7, 




Heaucns, the Earth, the Waters, all confufed, and afterward, the Waters congrega- 
ted, the Earth made dry land, and the Heauens diltinguiihed from both, and beauti- 
fied. And therefore the Earth, as it was earth , before it was vncouered , and before 
it was called, Arida, or dry land ; and the Waters were waters, before they were con- 
gregated and called the Sea, though neither ofthem perfect , or inriched with their 
vcrtuall formes : Co the Sunne, although it had not his fbrmall perfection , his circle, 
beauty, and bounded magnitude, till the fourth day.yet was the fubftance thereofin 
thefirftday (vnder the name of Light) created; and this light formerly dilpcried, 
was in the lame fourth day vnited and let in the firmament of Heauen : for to Light 
created in the firftday God gaue no proper place or fixation , and therefore the ef- 
fects named by Anticipation, (which was to feparateday from night) were prccifely 
performed, after this light was congregated and had obtained life and motion. Nei- 
ther did the wifedome of Godfindecaufewhy it fhouldmoue ( by which motion 
dayes and nights are diftinguifhed ) till then : becaufe there was not yet any creature 
produced, to which, by moiling, the Sunne might giuc light, heat, and ope- 
ration. 

But aftcrthe Earth(diftinguifh«! from waters) beganne to budde forth the budde 

a of the hearbe, &c. God caufed the Sunne to moue, and (by interchange oftime) to 

* ■ • vifiteeucrypartoftheinferiourworld; byhisheatetoftirrevpthe fireof generati- 

S^emidmedmn on, and to giucactiuitytothefeedesofallnatures: For as a King, which comman- 

" c " deth fome goodly building to bee erected , doth accommodate the fame to that vie 




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Hem. 



and end, to which it was ordayncd ; fo it pleafed God (frnhProcopius) to command 
the light to be ; which by his all-powcrfull word he approued, and approuing it diC 
poled thereof, to the vie and comfort of his future creatures. 

But in that it pleafed God to aske of I o b, by what way is the light parted , and where 
is the way where light dwelletb; we thereby know, that the nature thereof falleth not . 
vnder mans vndcrft anding ; and therefore let it luffice, that by Gods grace we enioy 
EfctM. c.s. 4 o. the effects thereof. For this light is of the treofure of God (faith Esdras.) Andthofe. 
which inhabite the heauens, doe only know the ((feme thereof. Nihil ig notum in ccelo^ ni- 
hil notum in ten a, Toothing vnknowne in heauen, nothing perfectly knowne en earth. \q 
Res vera font inmundoinuifibili , mmundovifibilivmbrx rerum : Things themfelues 
are in the inuifible world, in the World 'vifible but their jhadowes; Surely if this light be 
not fpirituall, yet it approcheth nearelf vnto Ipirituality ; and if it haue any corpora- 
lity, then of all other the moft fubtile and pure ; for howlbeuer,it is ofall things feen, 
the moft beautifull , and of thelwifteft motion , of all other the moft neceflary and 
bcneficiall. For it miniftrcth to men and other creatures all celeftjall influences ; it 
diffipateth thofe fadde thoughts and lorrowes, which the darkenefTe both begetteth 
and maintaineth; it difcouereth vnto vs the glorious workes of God, and carrieth 
vp with an Angelicall fwiftnelTe our eyes vnto heauen, that by the fight thereof, our ^, 
mindes being informed of his vifible meruailes, may continually trauaile to fur- ao 
mount thefe perceiucd heauens , and to finde out their omnipotent caule and Crea- 
tour. Cognitionon quiefcit in rebus crcatis ; Our knowledge doth not quiet it felfe in 
things created. Et ipfti lux facit, vt cat era mundi membra dignafmt Liudibvs, cumfuam 
honitatem & decorem omnibus communicet, It is the light, (lakh S c . A u s r. o s e) that 
rnaketh the other part of the world fo worthy of 'praife, feeing that it felfe comrnttnicatelh 
itsgoodnejfe and beauty vnto all : of which Quid out of Orpheus : 






<M) 



tjitfm 



1*1 




VllM. 






pi6d.flJet.t.t. 



Ille egofam, qui longum metier annum, 
Omnia qui video, per quern videt omnia mundtu, 
i-Mundi octtlus. 

The world dilcernes it felfe, while I the world behold, 
By me the longeftyeares, and other times are told, 
J the worlds eye. 



50 



'i>- 



Laftly, 



v 



WMMrtJ.j3 



C h a p .!.§.%. of the Hiftorie of the World. 

Laftly, if we may behold in any creature any one fparke of that eternall fire,o7a- 
ny farre-off-dawn.ng of Gods glorious brightncflb, the fame in the beauty, motion 
and vertue of this light may beperceiued. Thereforewas God called hi hfa , and 
thchghtby Hermes named laxfancla, andc^ourSamourfaid to bee that !,,ht 
which lighteneth euery mm that commeth into the world. Yet in refpecf of Gods incom- 
prehenlib efublimitie, and puritie, this is alio true, that God is neither a minde nora 
, SpmtorthenatureofothcrSpints,noralight,fuchas can bcdifcerncd. Deusprofe- 
Bo nan mens eU at vera vtfit mens caufa eft; necffiritm,fed cmfa qm (biritw ext/t ; net 
lumen,fedcaufi qua lumen exiftit. God (faith H e a U e s in PosmAndro) amine- v- 

10 lytsnotaminde^batthecaufe, that the minde hath his being; nor (bint , but theemfeh 
which euery ft mt is ; nor light , but the caufe by which the light exifteth 

So then the Maffe and Chaos being firft created, void, darke , and imfoffne'd , was 
by the operatme Spirit of God pierced and quickned, and the Waters bailing now 
receiucd Spirit and motion, refolued their thinner parts into aire, which God illieht- 
ncd .the Earth alfo by being contignat,and mixt with waters (participating the fame <s- , T0 
diuine vertue) brought forth the budde of the hcarbe that fecdeth fc ede, &c and for ' ' ' 
a meanc and organ, by which this operatiue vertue might be continucd,God appoin- 
ted the light to be vmted, and gaue it alfo motion and heat, which heat caufed a con- 
tinuance of thofe feucnttfpeaes , which the Earth (being made fruitful! by the Spi- 

.20 nt) produced, and with motion begat the time, and times fucceeding. 




$. VIII. 

Of 'the firmament , and of the waters abotie the firmament: and whether 

there be any crijla/line heauen, or any primum 

mobile. 

i Fterthat the Spirit of God had moiled vpoh the waters , and light was 
| created, Godfaid, Let there be a firmament in the middeft of "the waters, 
i andletit feparate the waters fiem the waters : that is , thofe waters which 
I byrarifaction and euaporation were afcended , and thofe of the Earth 
and Sea. 
But thefe waters feparate aboue this extenfion , which the Latine tranfiation cal- 
lcthfirmamentum,iorexfanfum (for (aVatablus , Vxgninin, and /*»/** turne it) arc 1 
not the cnftallinc Hcauens, created in the imaginations of men , which opinion Bafi- 
lius Magnus callcth a childiih fuppofition, making in the fame place many learned ar- 
guments againft this fancie. For the waters aboue the firmament , are the waters in 
^ tneaireaboucvs, where the fime is more folic! and condenfe, which God feparated 
40 from the ncather waters by a firmament, that is, by an extended diftance and vaft 
fpace : the wordes Raquia, which MenUnus writcth Rahagh, and Shamai/m, being in- 
differently taken for the heauen and for aire,and more properly for the aire and xther 
then for the Heauens, as the bed Hebricians vnderftand them , quofuprema ac tcmia lMm 
abtnfimis crafiis diduBa interfecla^ diftarent, for that whereby thifiprcmeandthinne bo- Mi si 
dies were placed in diftance being fcuered andcut off fiomlow and groffe matters : and the 
waters aboue the firmament exprcft in the word Maijm , are in that tongue taken 
properly for the waters aboue the aire, or in the vppcrmorc Region ofthc fame. 

And that the word Heauen is vfodfor the aire, the Scriptures euery where wk- 
nclIe,asinthebleffingsof/o/^/7,andinthc io4.Pfalme. * By thefe fprings jball the gam? 
jo fowle of the heauen dwel/;and a vpon Sodome andGomorrha it rained brimfione and fire oat * p i al - 
of the heauen; tmd'm/faacs bleffing to I a c o b, God giue thee therefore of the dew of \1%, 
heauen; and in Deuteronomy the \ 1. But the Und,whitheryou goe to poffeffe itjs aland, ©vli.'j 
tbatdrinkcth water of the raine of heauen ," and in I o n, who hathingendredthe frcsis of j»4 3 8. 
heauen ; and in S c . M a t t h e w, Behold the fowle s of heauen , for they fow not. M: , n e 

So 




19.14, 

18. 

1. II. 



1% 



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The fir ft < Boo{e ofthe fir jl part Cha p. 1.^.9. 



So as in all the Scriptures ofthe old Teftamcnt throughout, is the word Hcaucn ve- 
ry often vfed fbrairejand taken alfb hyperbolically for any great heighth, as , Letvs 
build -us a Tower, whofe toppe may reach to heaucn, ejj-c. and in this very place Bafil a- 
uoucheth that this appellation of hcaucn for the firmament, is but by way of fimili- 
tude : his owne wordes be thefe , Et vocauit Dew firmamentum caelum. H>ec appellatio 
alij qstidem proprte accommodatur, hitic autcm niine adfimilitudinem; o^W God called the 
firmament heauen :This appellation (faith Bafil) is properly applyed to another (that 
is, to the Starry Hcaucn) kit to this (that is, to the Firmament deuiding the wa- 
ters) it if impofed by fimilitude -. and if there were no other proofe, that by the 
firmament was meant the aire , and not the Heaucn , the wordes of M o s e s J o 
in the eighth Verfe conferred with the fame word Firmament in the twentieth 
Verfe makes it manifeft : for in the eight Verfe it is written , that God called the fir- 
mament, which deuided waters from waters, Heaucn; and in the 10. Verfe hee 
calleth the firmament of Heaucn, aire,in thefe wordes : i^Andlet tbefovcleflievpon the 
earth in the open firmament oj 'heaucn : and what vfe there fhould be of this icye, or 
criftalline,or waterieheaucnJ conceiuenot,cxcept it be tomoderare and temper the 
heat, which the Primum mobi/ewould otherwife gather and increafe: though in very 
truth,in ftead of this helpe,it would addc an vnmeafurable greatnefTe of circle, where- 
by the fwiftnefle of that firft Moueable would exceede all poffibilitie of beleefe. 
Sed nemotenetur ad impopbilia , but no man ought to be heldtoimpoflibilities; and faith 20 
it felfe ( which fiirmounteth the heighth of all humane reafbn) hath for a forcible 
conduiter the word oftruth, which alfb may be called lumen ornnu rationis, & intel- 
lects , the light of all reafon and vnder [landing. Now that this fuppofed firft Moue- 
able turneth it felfe fb many hundreth thoufand miles in an inftant (feeing the Scrip- 
tures teach it not) let thofe that can belecue mens imaginations, apprehend it , for I 
can not : but of thefe many heauens, let the Reader, thatdefiretlflSfaaio^Tearcfr" 
Orontius, and of this waterie Heauen, Bafdim <JMagnm in his Hexam. fol. 40. 41 . &c . 
and Matth.Beroaldas his fecond Booke and fixt Chapter. For my felfe f am perfwa- 
ded, that the waters called the waters aboue the :heaueriSj„are but the clowdes and 
waters ingendred in the vppcrmoft aire. 3 6 




$. IX. 

^A conchfwn repeating the Jumme ofthe workesin the Creation, which 

are reduced to three heads: The creation of matter , The 

forming of it , The finishing 

of it. 

* O conclude, it may bee gathered out ofthe firft Chapter of Genejis, 
|. that this was the order ofthe moftwife G od in the beginning, and 4° 
\ when there was no other nature, or being, but Godsincomprehenfible 
} eternitie. Firft, he created the matter of all things : and in the firft 
i three daics he diftinguifhed and gaue to euery nature his proper forme; 
the forme of leuitie to that which afcended , to that which defcended , the forme of 
grauitie .- for he feparated light from darkenefTe, deuided waters from waters, and ga- 
thered the waters vnder the firmament into one place. In the laft three dayes, God 
adorned, beautified, and replenifhed the world : he Jet in trie firmament of Heauen, 
the Sunne, Moone, and Starres ; filled the Earth with Beafts , the Aire with Fowle' 
and the Sea withFifh, giuing to all , that haue life , a power generatiue , thereby to 
continue their Species and kindes ; to creatures vegetatiue and growing, their feedes 5° 
afSj2.s4«Ui. in themfelues ; far he created all things, that they might haue their being: andthe gene- 
rations ofthe world are prefer tied. 

$. X. 



iX 



f 



Id* 



\fi 



tota 



'■"tr !A 
rfcaflecftheJir. 



ffitte.or 



, God 



<40f. 



C h a p .i.§. i o . 0/}^ Hijiorie of the World. 




\. x. 

>c* rto«a**««fiWflPrincipiumperie; nor forme the giuer of being! andof our, ■ 
ignorance, how fecond caujcs fhould haue any proportion with 
their effects. 

i Nd for this working power, which wecall Nature, the beginning of 
| motion and reft, according to Anftotle, the fame is nothing die, but the f *• * ' 
i ftrength and faculty, which God hath mfufed into euery creature, ha- 
ving no other felfe-ability, then a Clockc, after it is wound vp by a 
manshand,hath. Thefe thcreforethat attribute vnto this facultie,any -. 
firft or fble power, hauc therein no other vnderftanding, then fuch a one hath , who / 
looking into the ftcrnc of a fhippe, and finding it guided by the helme and rudder, ^ 
doth afcribe fome abfolute vertue to the pecce of wood, without all consideration of 
the hand, that guides it, or of the ludgement, which alfo direc tcth and commandeth 
that hand; forgetting in this and in all elfe , that by the vertue of the firfl aft, allA- 
gents worke whatfoeuer they worke : Virtuteprimi a8m agunt agent i a omnia quicquid 
agunt ■. for as the minde of man feeth by the Organ of the eye , heareth by the eares, 
and maketh choife by the will : and therefore we attribute fight to the eye , and hca- 
zo ring to the cares, &c. and yet it is the minde only, that giuethabilitie, life, andmo- 
tion to all the£- his inftruments and Organs ; fo God Worketh by Angels, by the 
Sunne, by the Starres, by Nature, or infilled properties , and by men , as by feuerall 
organs, feuef all cffeas;all fecond caufes whatfoeuer being but inftruments,conduits, 
and pipes, which carry and difperfe what theyhaue receiued from the head and 
fountaineofthe Vniuerfall. For as it is Gods infinite power , and euery-wherc-pre- 
fence (compafflng , embracing, and piercing all things) thatgiuethtothe Sunne 
power to draw vp vapours, to vapours to be made eloudes, cloudes to contayne 
raine, and raine to fall : fo all fecond and inftrumentall caufes , together with Nature 
it felfe, without that operatiue facultie which God gaue them , would becomealto- 
30 getherfilent,vertuelefTe, and dead,: ofwhieh excellently O r i> h e vs ; Per te viref Uatuta e*im> 
cunt omnia, All things by thee firing forth in youthful! greene. I enforce not thefe "N'te prmi? 
things , thereby to annihilate thofe variable vertues , which God hath giuen to his ttTdtsmT 
creatures, animate and inanimate, to heauenlyand earthly bodies , &c. for all his pwfmnibu'efl. 
workes in their vermes praifehim : but of the manner how God worketh in them, or taClJe f d f- s f 
, they in or with each other, which the Heathen Philofophers , and thofe that follow '"**"' i 
them, haue taken on them to teach : I fay there is not any one among them , nor any 
one among vs, that could euer yet conceiue it,or exprefle it,cuer enrich his ownc vn- 
derftanding with any certaine truth, or euer edifie others (not foolifh by felfe-flatte- 
tie) therein. For (faith Laslantius, fpeakkig of the wifedome of the Philofophers) > 
^ofifacultas inueniendx. veritatis huic fludiofubiacerei , aliquando ejfet intent a ; cum verb 
tot temper ibus, tot ingenifs in eius inquifitione contritis, nonfit comprehenfa , apparet nul- 
. lamibieffefapientitm, if in this finale (faith he) were meanes to fmde out the truth, it 
had ere this beene found 'out : but feeing it is not yet comprehended , after thatfo much time, 
andfo many wits haue beene wornc out in the inquirie of it , /'/ appear eth , that there is no 
(- wifedome there to be had. TSQmfidevnareprxcifafacntiahabereiur^omniumrerumfci- cjtfiafe 
i entia ncceffario haberetur, Jftheprecife knowledge of any one thing were to be hadjtfyould u - <■$ 
neceffarily follow , that the knowledge of all things were to be had. AndasthePhilofo- 
y phers were ignorant in nature, and the wayes of her working : fo werethey more cu- 
rious, then knowing, in their firft matter and Phyficall forme. For if their firft mat- 
j o tcr had any being, it were not then the firfl: matter : for, as it is the firft matter, i t hath 
only a power of being, which italtogcther leaucth, when it doth fubfift. Andfeeing 
i, it is neither a fubftance perfect, nor a fubftance inchoate, or in the way of perfection, 
how any other fubftance ffiould thence take concrefcence, it hath notbeene taught t 
neither are thek formes ( faith a learned Authour) any thing, /iexeaexprimantur 

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potentia, qu.e nihil eft. Againc, how this firft matter lhould be /ubieclum /ormarum 
and palfuie, which is vnderftood to precede the forme , i t is hard to ccncciue : for to 
make forme which is the caufc, to be fubfequent to the thing caufed ( to wit , to the 
hrft matter) is contrary to all rcafon, diuineand humane: only it may be faid'that o- 
riginally there is no other difference betweene matter and forme, then bctweenehcat 
: and fire, of which the one cannot fubfift without the other, but in a kind of ra tionall 
confidcration. Leauing therefore thefe riddles to their louers,who by ccrtaine fcho- 
lafticail diftinctionswreftandperuerr the truth of al! things, and by which Ariflotle 
hath laboured to proue a falfc eternitie of the world , I thinke it farre /afer to affirm e 
with S*. A v c v s t 1 n f, That all /pedes and kinds are from Cod, from whom,whatfoeuer j 
is natural! prcceedeth, of fflbat kinde or eflimaticn /ceuer ,from whence are the /cedes of all 
formes, and the formes of all /cedes and their motions \ A quo est onsnu /pedes , k quo ctt 
quicquidnaturalitcr ejl, cut uf curs % generis eft , cuiu/cun^ aftimattenis iff , a quo f tint /e- 
mina formarum, form&/emii.um, motm femmum at ^ format um. And thus much A- 
uerrcis is forced to con fifle. For all formes (faith he) are in pr two mot ore \ which is 
alfo the opinion of Ariflotle in the twelfth of his Metaph. and of Albert*; vpon 
Vionyfiits. 



tor 



$. XI. 



50 




30 



lima fit. 7, ioi 



Of Fate ; and that the Starves haue great influence : andthst their operations ■ 
may duter/iy bepreuentedor furthered. 

Nd, as of Nature, fiich is the difoute and contention concerning Fate or 
I Deftinie, of which the opinions ofthofo learned men that haue written 
i thereof; may be fafely receiued, had they not thereunto annexed and 
1 fattened an inrui table neceflity, and made it more generall, and vmuer- 

fally powerfull then if is, by giuing it dominion ouer the minde of man, 
and oucr his will; of which Ouid snd luuenal. 

Ratk/atum vincere nulla valet. 

Seruts regna dabunt, captiuis Fata triumphs. 

GainftFatcnocounfellcanpreuaile. - •• 

Kingdomes to flaues , by Deftinie, 
To Captiues triumphs giuen be. 

AnerrourofthecMto#/,andaftcrthemoftheStoicks, thePharilees, Prifcil- 
lianifts, the Bardifanifts, and others, as Bxfil, Lsfugus'hne, and Thomas haue obferued: 40 
but, that Fate is an obedience of fecond caufes to the firft , was we'll concerned of 
Hermes , and ^yipuldus the Platonift. viotinm r out of the Affronomers calleth it a 
difpofitionfrom the acfsof celeftiallOrbes, vnchangcably working in inferiour bo- 
dies, the fame being alfo trae enough, in refpect of'all thofe things, which a rationall 
minde doth not order nor direct. Vtolomie^ Seneca, Democrittis, Epicurus, Chry/tppiu y 
Empedodes, and the stoicksfome of them more largely, others more ftrictly, afcribe 
to Fate a binding and incuitable neceflity, and that it is the fame which is fooken 
and determined by Cod (quodde vnoquofy nostrum fatiis ell Dew) and the definite lot 
of all liuing. Andcertaincly it cannot be doubted , buttheStarresareinftruments 
of farre greater vfe, then to giuc an obfeure light, and for men to gaze on after Snnne 
fet : it being manifeft, that the diuerfity of feafons, the Winters, and Sommcrs,more 
hot and cold,are not fb vneertained by the Sunne and Moone alone,who al way keep 
one and the fame courfe, but that the Starres haue alfo their working therein. 

And if we cannot deny ,.but that God hath giuen venues to fprings, andfoun- 

tames. 



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tames to cold earth, to plants and ftones, Minerals , and to the excrements!! parts of 
theEaftflliuing creatures, whyQlouldweembbp^K^.^.,,.,^ nfrrA M m 
King powers ; tor feeing they are many in number and of eminent beauty and roicmi- 
tucle, we may not thmke , that in the treafury of his wifedome who >s infinite there 
can be wanting (cuen for euery ftarre) a pecul iar venue and operation : as'eucry 
hearbc, plant, fruit, and flower, adorning the face of the Earth hath the like For as 
thefe were not created to beautifie the earth alone, and to couer and ihadow her du- 
lly face, but otherwife for the vie of man and beaft , to feede them and cure them • fo 
werenotthofevncountablegloriousbodiesfoin the firmament, to no other end '' t 
i o then to adorne itTBut for mftruments and organs ofhis diuine prouidence, fo farreas P 
ithathpleafeah.siuftwilltodeterm.ne Or/p* vpan this place of Genefis, Letthere ' Gatl „• 
be light ,n the firmament, &c. affirmeth that the Starrcs are not caufes ( meaning per- 
chance binding caufes) but are as open bookes, wherein are contained and let downe 
al things wnatfoeuer to come ■ but not to be read by the eyes ofhumane wifedome- 
which latter part I beleeue well , and this faying o?Symides withal!, That there ar ' 
biddeyet greater things then thefe he , wive hauefeene hut a few ofhU workes. And 
though, for the capacitie of men, we know fomewhat , yet in the true and vttermoft 
vcrtues of hearbs and plants , which our felues low and fet , and which crow vnder 
• ourfeete, wcjumci eftignorant; much more in the powers and working of cele- 
20 ftial bodies : for hardly (faith* Salomon)^ m difcernethe things that auvpor the 
earth , and with great labour finde we out thofe things that are before vs : who an then m 
ueftigatethe things that are, n heauen ? Mult urn eft <k rebut cxleftbm aliguid cohere ■ 



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mfd.9.16. 



Arijlotlf, 



It « much to know a little of heauenly things. But in thlsqueftion of FateTlhtmiddl e 
courfeis to befollowed, that as with the Heathen we doe not binde God to his crea- 
. • , turcs > ' n ,™ s fuppofed neceffity ofdeftmie,fo on the contrary we doc not robbe thofe 
beauti nil creatures of their powers and offices. For had any of thefe fecond caufes 
defpoiledGod of his prerogatiue, or had Godhimfclfeconftrainedthemindeand 
will ofman to impiousacb by any celeftiall inforcements, then fure the impious ex- 
cufeoffomewereiuftihablejofwhomS^.AvcvsTiNE. ImpiAperuerCuateml a r 

3 o ft/*«^^/v«««^4i foul, JZ/yZt TwL ffissr 

commifforemfcelermn wherewereprehendthemofeuilldeedes, they aglinewnh wicked 
peruerfeneffevrge, that rather the Author andCreatour of the StJref, then the doer of 
trie emu is to be ucufed. J 

But that theStarres and other celeftiall bodies incline the will by mediation ofjhe ■ 

b. doubted Corporacelcflia (faith Damascene) confiitmntin nobis habitus, com- ,. 
tdTtrt ff t'Tl l hsh r™ lybod ' es ^^)^'»vs habits, complexions, 
«fjfpfj>™s : for 'the body though toinfbrceit further) hath vndouitedlya «.a*.«. 
fandcofdiawingaftcrittheaffeclions of theminde, efpecially bodies ftrong in hu- &■'«*. 

to anger, and thefunous effects thereof; by which they fuffer them felues to be tranf- 
por ted, where the mindehath notrcafon to remcmber,that paffions ought ro be her 
vaflailes,notherMafters And that they wholly direct the reafonlelTeminde I am 
relolued:Foral! thofe which were created mortal!, as birds, beafts, andthelikeare 
iert to their naturall appetites, ouer all which, celeftiall bodies (asinftruments and 
executionersofGods P rouidcncc)haucabfolutcdominion. Whatwefhouldiudge 
otmen.whohttlediflerfrom beafts, I cannot tell : forashethatcontcndetha°ainft 
tnole inforcements, may eaiily mafter or refift them r fo whofoeuer fhall nrelel the 
■ remedies by ycrtue and pietie prepared,puttcth himfelfe altogether vnder the power 

^^ 2V ^'€T $Ur f^ m ^'^ Ul ' '"^fi^tempferu -.Fatewi/lbeo- &,„, 
»err.ome,ifthoureftflit,ifthounegleci,itconqaereth. 

B ut that either the Starres or the Sunne hauc any power ouer the mindes of men 
immediately, it is abfurd to thinke, other then as aforefaid, as the /lime by the bodies 
tempermay beeffecfed. Lumenfolisadgenerationemfenfibtlhrncorporumconfert, & Un *&t 

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ad vitam if Jam mouet, & nutrit, & auget, ejr perficit : The light of the Sunne (fii th Saint 
Avgvstine) helpeth the generation of ' fenfible bodies t moueth them to life,and aourifb- 
eth, augment eth, andperfecleth them : yet {till as a Minifter , not as a Mafter : Bonus qui* 
dem ejt Sol,in miniferio.non impcrio; Tb£ Sunne isgcodtoferuejaot to fatty (faith S'.Am- 
brofe.) And S c . Avgvstine : VeusTegit mferiora corpora per fuperiorx; Godruleth 
the bodies below by thofe aboue, but he auoucheth not that fiiperiour bodies haue rule o- 
uer mens minds, which are incorporeall. 

But howfoeuer we are by the Starrcs inclined at our birth , yet there are many 7 
things both in nature and art, that encounter the fame, and weaken their operation : 7 ' 
and i^«yk/&hirnfelfeconfefleth, that the heauens doe no't alwaies worke their cf- j IO 
feels in inferiour bodies, no more then the fignes ofraine and wind doe alwaies come 
to paffe. And it is diuers times feene , that paternall vertue and vice hath his coun- • 
tcr-working to thefe inclinations. Eli in Iuuencis patrum virtus ; In the young of- 
fpring the fathers vertue is , and fo the contrary, patrum vitia 1 and herein alfo there 
is Often found an enterchange ; the Sonnes of vertuous men . by an ill ronfteljarj"" 
become in clinab leto vice, and ofv itiousmen , to vertue^ 

Egregia eftf>boles,feelerato nataparente. 

_ uu"A worthy fbnneisborneof a wicked father. 

But there is nothing (after Gods referued power) that fo much fetteth this art of 
lL>)C<frW± ^vM^AfOH^SCXa^re and rule, as education doth: for there are none in the world /- 
»^Z P? -^ •-' io wickedly inclined , but that a religiousin%uction and bringing vp may fafhion a- 7 
l*. v"^(- new, and reforme them ; nor any fo well difpofed, whom (the raines being let loofe) 

thecontinuall fellowihipandfamiliaritie, and the examples ofdiffolutemenmay 
L £1™ corru P t and Reforme. VefTels will euer retaine a fauour of their firft liquor • it be- 
H>WBihg equa lly difficul t either to cleanfe the minde once corrupted, or to^ctinguifluhe 
fweet lauourofvertue firft recciued, when the minde was yet tender, open , and eafi- 
lyfeafoned; butwhereafiuourablcconftellation (allowing that the Starres incline 2Q 
the will) and a vertuous education doe happily arriue, or the contrarie in both, there- 
by it is that men are found fo exceeding vertuous or vitious, heauen and earth (as it 
were) running together,and agreeing in one : for as the fecdes of vertue may by the 
art and husbandry of Chriftian counfaile produce better and morebeautifull fruit 
then the ftrength of felfe nature and kinde could haue yeelded them ; fo the plants • 
apt to grow wild, and to change themfelues into weedes , by being fet in a foile fina- 
ble, and like themfelues , are made more vnfauoury and filled with poyfon. It was 
. • therefore truly affirmed, Sapiens aditmabit opus aflrorum^quemitdmodhm agricok terra ■ 
ftaturm; <-_^ wife man afifteih the worke of the Starres , as the husbandman helpeth the 
nature of the foile. And W*/«w<rhimfelfeconfcffeth thus much, Sapiens, & omnia ft- *g 
pientis medici dominabuntur aftris , A wife man , and the ominous art of a wife Phy fit tan 
fhall preuaile againft the ftarres. Laftly, we ought all to know, that God created the 
ftarres, as he did the reft of the Vniuerfall , whofe influences may be called his refer- 
ued and vnwritten lawes. But let vs confider how they binde : euen as the lawes of 
men doe; for although the Kings and Princes of the world haue by their lawes de- Sf6 
creed, that a theefeand a murderer fhallfuffer death 5 and though their ordinaAcS 
; 3 atedayliebyIudgesandMagiftrates (the Starres of Kings) executed accordingly, 
y et meje lawes doe not depnue Kings of their naturall or religious compaffion, or 
binde them without prerogatiue, to fuch a fcuere execution , as that there fhould be • 
nothing left of libertie to iudgement, power , or confcience : the Law in h is owne na- .« 
turcbeingno other then a deafe Tyrant. But feeing that it is Otherwife, andthat 5 . 
1 nnces (who ought to imitate God in all they can) doefometimesforcaufesto 
themfe uesknowne, and by mediation , pardon offences both againft others and 
tnemlelues,tt were then impious to take that power and libertie from God himfelfe, 

which 



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P.I.^.IZ. 



of the Riftorie of the World. 



17 



which his Subfhtutes emoy ; God being mercy, goodnelTe, and chantie k folic. O- 
therwife that example of prayer by our Sauiour taught. ^4ndlet vs not kledde vn- 
to temptation, but delmer ysfrvm emit, had becne no other but an expenfc of wordes 
and time; bu^that God (wbchonlyknoweththeopcrauonofhisownecrcatures 



Halt. 6. 1 3. 



, TV 1 rr ■, , , . — J. -"•"' >-""«; "^ci iiuuu or ins owne creatures 
truly) hath allured vs, that there is no inclination or temptation fo forcible , which 
our humble prayers and defircs may not make fruftrate, and breake a/undcr ■ 'or 
were it (as the Sto.cks conceiue) that Fate or Deftinie, though depending vpon eter- 
nal! power yet being once ordered and difpofed, had fuch a connexion and immut- 
ble dependence, that God himfelfe (hould in a kinde haue fhut vp himfelfe therein 
1 o How mtferdle then were the condition of men (faith S\ A v c v s t 1 n e) left altogether 
without J>qfe. * 

And if this ftrength of the Starres were fo transfer d, as that God had quitted vn- 
, ro them all dominion ouer hiscreatures ■ be he Pagan or Chriftian that/6 beleeueth 
theonly trueGodof theone.andtheimaginarie Gods oTthe other Would thereby 
be delpoiled of all worlhip, rcuerence, or refpect. 7 

Andcertainely, God which hath promifedvs the reward of welldoing, which 

gaueflmetodoe.) And thefimeGod, who hath threatned vnto vstheforrowand 
torment of oftcnces,could not contrary to his, mercifull nature befo vniuilasto bind 

10 vs ineuitablyjo the deflimes, or influences of the Starres.or fubiefl our Joules to any 
impofed neceffme. But it was well fiid of Plotinw, that the ftarres were nVnirlcant 
but not efficient , giu.ng them yet fomethmg lefle then their due : and therefore as I 
doe not con ent with thofe , who would make thofe glorious creatures of God vcr- 
tuelefTe :fo I thmke that we derogate from his eternall and abfolute power and pro- 
uidence, to afcribe to them the fame dominion ouer our immortallfbules , which 
they haue ouer all bodily fubftances , and penfhable natures .- for the foules of men 
loumg and fearing God, receiue influence from that diuine light it felfe, whereof the 
Sunnesclaritie, and that of the Starres is by Plato called butafhadow. Lumen eli PLfAt. 
vmbmVei >,& Bereft lumen luminis, Light uthe^dowofGodsbr^htnefTcwhouthe ««»-»^-M 

flight of Lght. Buttoendthisqucftion, bccaufethisDeftmie, togetherwith Proui- , 7 

dence, Prcfcience, and Predeft.nation are often confounded, I thmke it not impeir- X 
ncnt to touch the difference in a word or two, for euerymanhathnotobferuedit/ 
though all learned men haue. 



£. XII 




p. ^v 1 t. 

Of Prcfcience, , /*^ ~ fWn>{r*5<" 

Refciencc, or fore-knowledge (which the Greekes aWProzne 



y^.'iOj'iS 3 tl7C 

Ratines pracogmtio, or prxf dentin) coniidered in order and nature (if 
|wemayfpeake of God after the manner of men) goeth before Proui- 
, dence .- for God fore-knew all things, before he had created them,or be- 
s fore they had being to be eared for ; and Prefcience is no other then an 
infallible fore-knowledge. Forwhatfoeuerourfelues fbre-know , except the fame 
be to fucceede accordingly, itcannotbetruethatwefore-knowit. But this Prefci- 
ence of God (as it is Prefcience only) is not the caufe of any thing futureiyfuccec- 
aing : neither doth Gods fore-knowledge impofe any neceflity, or binde.For in that 
we fore-know that the Sunne will rife, and fet ; that all men borne in the world (hall 
dieagame; that after Winter, the Spring (hall come, after the Spring Sommerand 
5° ™ rue ft,and that according to the feuerall feedes that we fbw, we ihall reape feuerall 
forts of grame, yet is not our fore-knowledge the caufe of this, oranyof thefe: nei- 
ther doth the knowledge in vs bindc or conftraine the Sunne to rife and fit , or men 
to die; for the caufcs (as men perfwade themfelues) are otherwife manifeft and 
inowne to all. The eye of man (faith B o e t i v s) heboldeth thofe thm«s fubtea to 

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fenfe, as they are ; the eye feet h thatfuch a beaft is a horfe.it feet h men,trcesj.ndhoufes,&c. 
hut our feeing of them (as they arc) is not the caufe of their fa being, for fuch thej he in their 
toiumde cofot. owne natures \ And againeout of the fame Authour. Diuina prouidentia rebus gene- 
randis non imponit necefitatem, quia fi omnia euenirent exnecefitate ,pr<emiabonorum, 
(jrptwtt malorumperiret, Divine providence (faith he) impofeth no necefity vpon things 
that are to exifl,for if all time topajfe ofnecefity,therefhouldncither be reward of good/ior 
pumfhmeni of em 11. 



ryy.147.8. 



pyai.104.t7. 

i4Mf. 

i.Xeg.17.4- 
Matt. 6.16. 

lxl^ell.6. 

7. 
I.Prt.5.7. 
P/a(.3<5.«. 

J a cm. ,13.14. 



Ifa'niS, 



$. XIII. 
Of Providence. 



id 




I Ow Prouidence (which the Greekescall Pronoia) is an intellectuall 
s knowledge, both fore-feeing, caringfor, and ordering all things, and 
, doth not only behold all part, all prefent , and all to come , butis the 
• caufe of their fo being, which Prefcience (fimply taken) is not : and 
1 therefore Prouidence by the Philofophers (faith ^.Augufline) is deui- ' 
ded into Memorie, K nowledge, and Care : IVlemorie of the part , Knowledge of the 
prefent, and Care of the future ; and we our felues account liich a man for prouident 2f> 
as, remembring things part , and obferuing things prefent , can by iudgement and 
comparing the one with the other, prouide for the future, and times /ucceeding 
That fuch a thing there is as Prouidence, the Scriptures euerywhere teach vs Motes 
inmany places , the Prophets in their prardidtions : Chrift himfelfe and his A'poftles 
affure vs hereof; and, bef ides the Scriptures, Hermes, Orpbem, Euripides. Pythagoras 
Plato, Plot mm, and (in effect) all learned men acknowledge the Prouidence of God • 
yea the Turks themfelues are fo confident therein, as they refufe not to accompanied . 
and vifit each other, in the moft peflilent difeafes, nor fhunne any perill whatfbeuer 
though death therein doe manifeftly prefent it felfe. 

The places of Scripture prouing Prouidence, arefomany, bothingeneralland 34 
particular, as I fhallneede to repeate but a few of them inthisplace. SinrvntoGcd 
(laith D a v id) which couereth the heauens withcloudes,andpreparethrai»efortheearth 
andmaketh thegrafe to grow vpon the mount aines, which giueth to beaUs their foode and 
fedeth the young Rauen that cries -.aUthefewaite vpon thee, that thou maietl <riue them 
foode m due feafon. ^fndthoufhaltdrinkeof theriuercheareth (faith God to E l 1 ah) 
and 1 haue commanded the Rauens tofeede thee there. Beheld the Fowles oftheaire, they 
ff* not, nor rcape,and yet your heauenly Father feedeth them : againe,are not two (barrowes 
Jodforafarthmg ? 'and one of 'them frail 'not fallen the ground without your Father ■ yeaall 
the hairesofyeur head are numbred. AndS'.PETER, Caff all your care on him, forhe 
caret h for you ; Andhis iudgement s are written (faith David) 

Godthcrefore, whoiseuerywhereprefent, whofilleth the heauens and the earth, 4 ° 
whofe eyes are vpon the righteous, and his countenance again ft them that doe euill ', was 
ttereiotebyOrpbcvscdkdoculvs infinite, an infinite eye, beholding all things and fr 2 

cannotthereforebeefteemedasanidlelookcron.asifhehadtransferredhispower 
toanyother: for it is contrary to hisowneword. Cloriam meam alteri non dabo • I 
ma not gme my glone to another • No man commanded in the Kings prefence, but 
by the Kings direction; butGodiseuerywhercprefent, and KihtfoT Kings The 

exarnpleofGodsvniucrfallproiiidenceisfeeneinhiscreatures. The Father proui- . 
dethforbschddrenrbeaft^ 

benmmSn dlnfeCOndFathcrs ' m " chmoreinthe nrftand Vniuerfall:andifthere , a 

thhn«uflTV?T me ?> andb 7^' ™ ch "™cinGod, whohathformed 5 
tins nature, and whofe d.umc loue was the beginning,and is the bond of the Vniuer- 

Zo^7 r i7" S rer " m ° mnmm ^ P"»«?'>»»>& vinculum vniucrfi (fifth Plato.) A ' 
Amor-Deiefimdvspeipetuus, mmdi copula , fartium^ em immobile fuflcnUcukm, L * 

iniuerfx 









»ioj 




H 



'%» 



'foil 



,,0r Pw4w„ 3 
^oiiait.and' 

xhvs,Miftt 

IhisApoMs 

'SfitlugM, 

we of God: 



; was 
,and 






C h a p .!.§• '+■ l 5- ?/>/^ Hifkrie of the World. 



I? 



vniucrf& machine fundamentum , The loue of God is the perpetuall knot , andlinkc or 

chain e oftbeworld,andthe immoucable filler ofeuery fart thereof, and the Bafts and fotm - 

dation of the vniuerfall. God therefore who could onely be the caule of all, can onely , e h.e P ,. CA ,, 

prouideforall,andfuftaineall; ib as to ablblute power; to cuery-where prefence • GMnitui. 

to perfect goodneife ; to pure and diuine loue ; this attribute and tranfcendent habi- 

litie of Prouidence is only proper and belonging. 



20 



$. XIIII. 

Of Predeftimttion, 




Ow for Predcftination ; we can difference it ho otherwiie > from Pro- '/ 
uidence and Preference, then in this, that Preference only fore-Ieer.li: 
Prouidence fore-feeth and careth for, and hath refpeft to all creatures, 
euen from the brighteft Angels of heauen, to the vnworthieft wormes fom.s.& 9, 
oftheearth, and Predcftination (asitisvledfpeciallybyDiuines) is 
only of men, and yet not of all to men belonging, but of their feluatton properly , in 
tEc common vfeofDiuines, or perdition, as fome haue vfed it. Yet Peter Lombard, imiBj.iJift.tf 
20 Thomas, Bernen/is Theologies , and others, take the word Predcftination more flxictly, r '*"" •;««.«. 
and for a preparation to felicitie.- diuers of the Fathers take it morelargely fbmtimes ; tL Yn'probi dt 
among whom S'. Auguftine fpeaking of two Citties , and two focieties , vfeth theft ;• d. 
wordes, Qaarumeflvna, quxpradeftinataejl in sternum regvare cunt Deo , alteratter- ^Zrj.c.tJj 
numfuppliciumfubire cumVi&olo, whereof one is it, which is predejimatedto raigne for ami- Dei,' ' 
etffr with Cod, but the other is to vndergoe euerlafiing torment with the Deuill : for accor- 
ding toNouivsMAicEUVs, deftintre eft pr spar arc ; and of the fame opinion C ai. h up 9 a 
are many Proteftant writers, as Calmn, Beza, Buchanus,Van*us, and fuch like: and as si<*».w.ii. 
for the manifold qucftions hereof arifing, I leaue them to the Diuines 5 and why it l^tZT'Td 
hath pleafed God to create fome veffels of honour , and fome of dishonour, I will Rm. % " 
30anfwerewithc7r^<jy/ir,whofaith, Quiin fatlisDeintionemnonvidet , infirmitatem "«*>■<•»•* 
f fuam con/iderans, cur non videat^ rationem vidct : He that feeth no reafon in the tflions of Gng.tttgt. 
God,by confederation ofbuowneinfirmitie pel 'ceiueth the reafon of his blindnefe. And a- ? cb 9- 
gaine with S'.Avcvstine, Occulta efe cau/a pot eft , intufta ejfe non pot eft; Hidden *'% ad TA 
the caufe of his Predeftinntion mtf be, vniuft it cannot be. 



W'J 



$. XV. 



43 



V 



Of Fortune: and of the reafon of fome things thatfecme to , 
by fortune, and againft reafon and 
Prouidence. 




^Affly , feeing Deftinie or'Neceffitie is fubfequentto Gods prouidence, 
®and feeing that the Starres haue no other dominion , then is before fpo- 
t ken, and that Nature is nothing, but as Plato calleth it , Dei art em, vel ar- 
ftificiofum Dei Organum, The art, or artificiall Organ of God : and Cvs anvs, 
-*Diuim pr&cepti inftrumentum , The 'instrument of the diuine precept , we 
may then with better reafon reiect that kinde of Idolatrie , or G od of fople s , called 
Fortune or Chance : a Goddeffe , the moil reuerenced , and the moftreuiled of all o- 
50 tfc, but not ancient; for He/awmaketh her the Daughter of bceanus , as Paufanias 
witnelTeth in his Mejfeniacks. The Greekes call her ivyku fignifying a relatiue being, 
or betiding, fb as before Homers time this great Ladie was fcarce heard off; and/fr- 
ftodus, who hath taught the birth and beginning of all thefe counterfeit Gods, hath 
not a word of Fortune ■■ yet afterward fhec grew fb great and omnipotent , as from strut n. 

Kings 






t& 







£§ii 


M 


i ass 




"1 3S3S 
f 288 


■ 


sss 
2 -"• 

1 III 


Eg 


S 


Den b/ifflaxs ^P 



£ U-~i 



' 



<-" *--■• 



^T 



20 



The fir ft \Boo{e oftbe fir fl part Csa p.i.$.ij . 



Kings and Kingdomes, to beggersand cottages, Ihce ordered all things, refining the 
wifedome of the wiJeft, by making the pofleflbr thereof mifcrable: valuing the tolly 
ofrhemoif fooliffi by making their fuccefle profperous , infomuch as theaftionsof 
,jncn were laid to be but the fports of Fortune, and the variable accidents happening 
Aur.viilMper- m mens lines, but her paftimes : ofwhich P*iLADivs,r* hominum ludus fortune 
<m_ efi,The life ofma^u the play of Fortune ;jindhcczuic it often fallethout, thateiiter- 

con- 
■of 



Demetrius Poll- 



man in the pnies guided by in counfelshaueequall fuccefle to thofe by the belt iud°envntco 
: a -fob^ ^E^frfS ^f Cd ' thcrcfore had F°»u« e 5^ fame externall figure with Sapience .- where 



*omme,i S i 31 i AtkemM. 

tol.aue vfed.tociieouc vpon Fortune, applying to her a Verfe ofiscHYi\ 

Longifime a Sapient in Tors dtfidet, 
Sed mult* perfcit tamen fimillima. 



T* mi extulijli, cadem mt k (ftnt'u) (n 



%^ia 



KerfiS, 






From wifedome Fortune differs farre, 
And yet in workes moft like they are. 

But I will forbeare to be curious in that, which ( as it is commonly vnderftood) 
is nothing die but a powerimaginarie, to which the fuccefle of humane actions and 
endeuours were for their varietieafcnbcd; for when a manifeftcaufe could not bee io 
gmen, then was it attributed to Fortune, as if there were no caufe of thofe things, of 
which moft men arc ignorant, contrary to this true ground of P t a t o : Tfjbtt eft or- 
tumfub Sole, cuius caufa legit ima non pr&cefferit , Toothing ener came to ftffi vnder the 
Same, of which there was not a iitfl preceding caufe. But Aquinas hath herein anfwe- 
red in one dif taction, whatfoeuer may be objected ; for many things there are ( faith 
he) which happen beftdes the intention of the inferieur , but not be/ides the intention of 
the fupertour : PMer intentionem inferiority fednon peter intentionem fuperioris, (to 
ST*** Wlt ^ theordlnanceofGod ; and therefore (faithMELANcHToN) QuodPoeUfor- 
u(w'lmm. X ' ti t mm > no$ Deum W tllmtw ■> whom ik Pe et' call Fortune , m know to be God, and that 
Sat. 10. 3 «6. this is true, the Scripture in many places teacheth vs, as in the law of murder. He that 3 © 
sxrtx**jgfairah a man, and he die,\l.ill die the death, andifa man hath not laidwaite, but C odhath 
offered him into his hands , then I will appoint thee a place whither he Jhaufiee. Now 
wheretheScripturehaththefewordes, God hath offered him into his hands, we fay, if 
he hurt him by Chance, and in Deuteronomie the nineteenth, where the flipping of 
an Axe from the helue, whereby an other is flaine, was the workcofGod himfelfe, 
wetnotirphrafe attribute this accident to Chance or Fortune : and in the Prouerbt 
the fixteenth, The lot is call into the lap fat the whole diflofitien thereof u of the Lord : fo 
asjdiatjyhich feeiaabjaflfkaju^ to Fortu ne, is yet difpofed by the or^__ • 

clmanceoFGpd, as all things elfe; and hereof the wileHorf; and the beft learned of 
the Philofophers were not ignorant, as Cicero witneflcth for them , gathering the opi- 40 ' 
nion of Ariftotle and his fectators, with thofe of Plato, and the Academikes to this ef- 
reft, That the fame power which they called animm mundi , the foule of the world, 
was no other then that incomprehenfiblc wif cdome,which we exprclTe by the name' 
of God, gouerning euery being afwcll in heauen as in earth ; to which wifedome and 
£kM.q>i*n.l.L power they fomerime gauc the title of neceffitie or Fate, becaufeit bindeth by ineui- 
tablc ordinance : fometime, theftile of Fortune, becaufe of many effects there ap- 
peare v.nto vs no certaine caufes. To this effect fpcaketh ^.Augufline in his queftions 
vpon ^^fthe.nrftBobke: the fame hath Seneu in his fourth of 'Benefits.; which 
wasalfothedoclrineoftheStoicks,ofwhichfcctheewas: For whatfoeuer (faithhee) 
thoucallc[lGod,bc itTfjture , Fate, or Fortune, all are but one and the fame, differenced co 
by d'.t'.ers termes, according as he vfcth,andexewfeth hit power diuerfly. 

But it may be obiected , that if Fortune and Chaunce were not fometimesthe 
caufesor good and euill in men, but an idle voice, whereby we exprcfle fuccefle, how- 
comes it then , <hat fo many worthy and wife men depend vpon fo many vnworthy 

and 



\a<k 



Scncc.t.i,. c.7. 



C* 1 









r. " 

thin 

pr03 







raout ,i' ** 



'■ K 



m 



• "im 



*"tki 



K p.1.^.15. cftheHi/torieoftheJVorld. 



21 



\ 



and erriptie-hcadcd fooles ; that riches and honour arcgiuen to cxtcrnall men and 
without kernell: and fo many learned, vertuous, and valiant menweare out their 
Imcs in poorc and dciecled eitates. In a word there is no other inferiour,or apparent 
caufe, befld'e the partialitie of mans affection , but the f aihioning and not fafhioning 
clour fclues according to the nature ofthc time wherein we Hue, for whofoeuer is 
moft able, and belt fufneient to difcerne , and hath withall an honeft and open heart 
• and louing truth, if Princes , or thofe that goucrne , endure no other difcourfe then 
. their owne flatteries , then I fay fuch an one , whole vertue and courage forbiddeth 
him to be bale and a diffembler, lhall euermore hang vnder the wheele, which kinde 
I o of deferuing well and recciuing ill , wee alwaics falfiy charge Fortune withall. For 
whofoeuer lhall tell any great man or Magiftratc, that he is not luft , the General! of 
an Armie, that he is not valiant, and great Ladies that they are not faire, (hall neuer 
, be made a Counieller, a Captaine, or a Courtier. Neither is it fufficient to be wife 
with a wife Prince, valiant with a valiant, and luft with him that is iuftfor fuch a one 
hathnoeftateinhisprofperitie; buthemuft alfo change with the fucceflbur 'if he 
be of contrary qualities, faile with the tide of the time , and alter forme and conditi- 
on, as the Lftate or the Eftates Mafter changeth.-Othcrwifehowwercitpolfiblc, 
/ that the moft bale men, and feparate from all imitable qualities, could fo often at- 
f- taine to honour and riches, but by fiich an obieruant fla uilh co irrie \ Thefemenha-' 
20 umg nothing clfe to value themfelucs by , but a courfSlftTmcte of wondring at o- 
ther men, and by making them beleeue that all their vices are vertues, andaUtheir 
duftieactionscnftalline, haue yet in all ages profpered equally with the moft ver- 
tuous, if not exceeded them. For according to Menander, Omnis infipiens ar- 
y ' rogmu &jlmfibus ufiturfiueryfooleU wonne with his owne pride andothers flattering 
applanfe : fo as whofoeuer will hue altogether out ofhimfelfe, and ftudie other mens 
humours, and obferue them, (hall neuer be vnfortunate ; and on the contrary , that 
man which prizeth truth and vertue (except the feafon wherein he liueth be of all 
thefe,and ofall forts ofgoodneffefruitfull ) lhall neuer profper by the poffeihon or 
profemon thereof. It is alfo a token of a worldly wifeman, not to warreor contend 
30m vaine againft the nature of times wherein he liueth : for fuch a one is often the au- 
thour of his owne miferie, but bell: it were to follow the aduife , which the Pope 
gaue the Bilhops ofthat age, out of Quid, while the Arian Herefie raged: 



<»^ 



:><r7? 



r 



&-■ 



i>lm furor in curfu eft, current i cede furor i; 

While furie gallops on the way, 
Let no man furies gallop ftay. 

And if Cicero (then whom that world begat not a man of more reputed iudge- 
40 ment) had followed the counfaile of his brother Qvintvs, Potuiffet (faith Pe- 
trarch) in leclulofuo.mori , potuifet integro caAauere fepeliri , He might then hum 
died the death of Culture, and beene with anvntorne anfvndiffeueredbsdy buried; for as 
Petrarch in the fame place no teth : Quidflultimqulmdefperantem ( prteferttm de effe- 
clu) litibiu perpetuus implicari, what more fooltfh then for him that dejpaires, efpecially of 
the effect, to be entangled with endleffe contentions ? Whofoeuer therefore will fet be- 
fore him Machiauels two mtrkes to fyoote at (to wit) riches, and glorie, muft fet on and 
take off a backe of yron to a weake wooden bow, that it may lit both the ftrong and 
the feeble : for as he, that firft deuifed to adde failes to rowing velTels , did either fo 
proportion them, as being fattened aloft, and towards the head of his Maft.he might 
jo abide all windes and ftormes, or elfe hefomctime orotherpenfhedby hisownein- 



Ouid.yem.aiK, 
tiki. 



Mv 



.r>~-t*~i- 






«wuuu«wiuvii, \Jl V.11V. Ilk. XU11H.LIUII. \JL UU'W J'tlinn.u UV 1J15 KJ \V11C Hi' 

uention : fo that man which prizeth vertue for it felfe,and cannot endure to hoife and' 7 
ftrikc his failes, as the dmcrs natures ofcalmes and ftormes require,muft cut his failes, 
and his cloth, of mcane length and breadth , and content himfelfc with a flow and \'yj f r C\. 

furenauigation,(towit)ameancandfreeeftate. But ofthisdifpute of Fortune, and "^ 

the 



\ttm 



it*. 



sss. 



11 



The fir ft \Boo(e of the fir (I part Cha p.2. §.i. 



thejsft, or of whatfoeuer Lords or Gods, imaginarie powers, or caufes, the wit ( or 

rather fooliihnefle) of'man hath found out: let vsrefblue with S'.Paul. whoh-ith 

,.cor. c .s.v. e . taught vs, that there is bjtt BM Gjd,the Father,*/ whom are all things, andwe in him., and 

apM.vtrf.€. one Lord, hjtis Christ, by -whom are all things, andwe by him ; there are diuerfities of 0- 

perations, but God is the fame which workcth all in all. 



C H 



A P. 



II. 



Of mans eftate in his firfi Creation, and of 
(fods reft. 



IO 



d. I. 

Of the Image of God, according to which man was firfi created, dU~ ^J 5 - ' {4rJ 



Gin.i.if. 



Trifm.A[cl.z.& 
do vohmt. Dei, 
Plat, leg. U. 




20 



S,tmtlum, quia 

pars pvlioripj- 

msrtalis, ariu 

mat, quia in 

mortati. 

Vn locum Oui J. 

aict.!.i.-;6. 



He creation of all other creatures being finiflied , the 
heauens adorned , and the earth replenilhed , God 
laid, Let vs make man in our owne Image, actor din* to 
our likeneffe. " 

Man is thelaftandmoftadmirable of Godsworkes 
tovsknowne, ingens miraculum homo , man is the grea- 
teft wonder ( faith Plato out of M e r. c v r. i v s : ) T^atu- 
r£ ardent if ima artificium,The artificiallworke of the moll 
ardent or fire-like nature (as faith Zoroafer) though the 
famebemeant, not for any excellence cxternall, but 30 
in refpect of his internall forme, bothin thenature 
qualities, and other attributes thereof: in nature , becaufe it hath an efTenceimmor- 
tall, and fpirituall ; in qualities, becaufe the fame was by God created holy and righ- 
teous in truth ; in other attributes, becaufe Man was made Lord of the world.and of 
the creatures therein. 

SanBias his animal mentify cafacius tit* 
Veer at adhuc : ejr quoddomtnari in tetera pojfet, 
'Nj.tm homo es~t. 



More holy then the reft, and vnderfhnding more 
A liuing creature wants, to role all made before, 
So man beganne to be. 



40 



Of this Image and fimilitude of God, there is much difpute among the Fathers, 
Schoole-men, and late Writers : Some of the Fathers conceiue , that man was made' 
after the Image of God, in refpeft chiefly of Empire and dominion,as S'.Chryfiflome 
<^tmbrofc, and fbme others : which S f . ^imbrcfe denyeth to the woman inthefe 
wordes, Vt ficufDcrnvnus, ab eofiercthomovntu , & quomoio ex Deo vno omnia, itd 
ex vno homine omne genus effet fuper facicm totius tcrrx : Vnm igitur vnum fecit ,' qui r 
vnitatu eim haberet imaginem , That as Codis one, one man might be made by him , and 
that in what manner all things are of one God, likewifcofone man the whole kindefbouldbe 
vpon the face of 'the whole earth : Therefore kebeing one made one , that fhould haue the 
Image of his vnitie. But whereas jt is gathered out of the following wordes of the 

fame 



J 






JOM 



fl 



h' ::: :... 









" : »r : , 








vA-vtf-" 



of the Hi/tone of the World. 



i 



10 



fame \ erfe, that man was after the image of God in refpeft of rule and power , it is 
written Domwamm m the pluralJ number, and let them rule mer thefifbof the Sea A-c 
and therefore cannot the woman be excluded. Others conceiue, char rimis fcj? to 
be after The image or God in rc/peftof his immortall fbuie only, becaufc' as God is in- 
iitliWe, to thetouje ohnan is muihble, as God is immortall and incorporall fo is "the 
iou eotmanimmortallaiidincorporaU; and as there is but one God which P ouer 
neth the world, fo but one foule which gouerncfh the bodv of man ; and as God is 
Wholly in cuery part of the world , fo is the foule of man wholly in euery part ofthc 
body ■Ammo, eft tola in tcte, & tot a m qualibet parte , The foule u wholly in the whole bo- 
dy, and wholly tn euery fart thereof \ according to Anfiotle j though Chdcidim.mA o- 



ther learned men denic that dofti 



J 



t»fi 



■ine ; which 



that it is othcrwife then potentially 



£ 



true, all the Ariftotelians in theworld ihall neucr proue. Thefeand the like areu 
raents doe the loses make (faith Toftatm) and thefercfemblances, betweenc the infi 
nite God, and the finite Man. 

The Sch6ole-men referable the Minde or Soule of Man to God , in this refneef tfi €J f *> %f 
especially; becauf e that as in the Minde there are three diftinft powersTor faculties 
(towit)Memone,Vndcrftandm g ,and\Vill, andyetallthefe, being of mil diffe 
rences, arebutonemmde : to in God there are three diftinft perfons, the Father 
Sonne, and holy Ghoft, andyetbutoneGod. They alfo make the Image and Si' 
20 mmtudediuers 5 andagame, theydiftinguifh betweenc imaginem Dei . and *J Ha 
jf ginem Dei, and ipinne into final! threds, wkhfubtile diftindions , many times the 
plamcneile and hneerkie of the Scriptures : their wits being like that ftrong water, 
that eateth through and diffolucth the pureft gold. VUlorinus alfb maketh the irnage 
of God to befobftantiall, but not the fimilitude -.fed in fubfiantia nomen qmliUtU%- 
ckrawitm, A word-dedarmg qualitie tnthe fubfance. Out of which wordes , and that 
which rolloweth, it is infer d, thatastheimagcandiimiiitudedoegreatlydiiTer • to 
the (innefull foule doth not therefore leaue to be the image of God ; but it hath not 
his f.mmtude, except ,tbe holy and righteous. S«. Auguftine alto againft Adimmtn* 
the Mmchee affirmeth, that by feme, the perfeftion ofthis image is toft in mankind 
3 o jn his Retractations mamtaineth the fame opinion, and alto affirmcth that the Simi- 
litude is more largely taken, then the Tmrwp L . / .- . « 



f>- V-r 



lirude is more largely taken, then the Imac 



,J. 



'S^zHk %& 



Buthowfoeuer the Scboole-men and others diftinguiffi , or wlTatfoeuer tliT™ 
thers conceiue tore I am that SKPaul maketh the famefenfe of the image, which V*. 
fTT T h0f , thefimll ^ e » who faith: ^6 « haueborne the iLage of the earthly, , £x< 49 
fo\hallwebearetbe image of the beanenly- and it cannot bee gathered out of the Scrip- * 

tures that the wordes imiigeandfimilitudewerevfed.butinonefenfe, and in this 
place the better to expreffc each other ; whatfoeuer Lw,bardh?xMxA to thecontra- 
rie. f or God knowes, what a multitude of meanings the wit of man imagineth to 
iiimlefte in the Scriptures, which neither Mofes, the Prophets, or AjoJUTT, euercon- 

40 ceiued. Now^S^TvTitlTtheword (image) for both :fcS«Ji»£vfeth the word 
( lmifitude) tor both in thefe wordes. Therewith bleffe wee God cue* the father , and 
therewth curje we Men , which are made after the fimilitude of Cod : Ho wfoeuer there- 
tore ^.Auguflme feemeth, out of a kindc ofelcgancie in writing , to make fomediffe- 
rence, as where he wnteth, Confitemur imaginem in uterniutefimilitudinem in mori- 
bmmueniri, weeonfeffe tbattbisimageisfoundineterntt!e,bt,thisfimilitudewman- 
xers, thatis, in the fpirituall difpofitions and qualities of the minde, yet thusheelfe- 
where fpeaketh plainely. Quafiverlfofit e[fe imago aliqua in qua fimiUtudonon fit: ft aw.vi [m 
emni omnwofimihs non eft,procUdubio nee imago elt, ^As //(fitch he) there could be anj 
tmage,where the fimilitude is not :no,out of doubt , where thereis nolikeneffc , thereisno 

50 mage. The veric wordes of the Text make this moftmanifeft, as Let us make mm 
in our image, according to our likeneffe : which is, Let vs make man in our image , that 
he may bee like vs; and in the next Veffe following God himfelfe jnaiethitplaine, 
for there he vftth the word (image) only, as thus. God created the man in his rmaae/m 
the image of God created he hint. And to take away all difpute or ambigmtie, in the 

toil 






7-w.j.?, 



njipri. 



f* 






r 4. 



■ 



24. 



The fir ft c Boo{e of the fir ft part Chap.2. §.1. 



Verf.io. 



Rom.i.i}. 



U3.1.1. 



IO 



pi Gen. 



$rd? 






m 



W *S 



firftVerfeof the fift Chapter, the word (fimilitudc) isvfedagaine by itielfc, as, 
in the day that God created A d a m, in the likentffe of God made he him. And this fimi- 
litude S . Paul Colof. the third , calleth the image. Put on (faith he) the ntvo man, which 
if renewed in knowledge after the image of him , that created him. A nd in Siracidcs it is 
•written, he made them according to his image. Now if we may belecue S.Paul before 
Peter Lombard and other Schoole-mcn , then it is as manifeft as wordes can make it 
that the i mage and fimilitudeis but the fame, for S./Wvfeth both the words direct- 
ly in one lento. For they turned the glorie ofihe incorruptible God,to the fimilitude of the 
image of a corruptible man. 

Zanchim laboureth to prone, that man was formed after the image of God , both 
zanch.dcop.Dei in body and minde : Nullapars in homine qua nonfuent huiufce imagmuparticeps.No 
fart in n mm (faith he)w&/^ was not participating Gods image -.for Godfaid,Let vs make 
man according to our owne image. But thcfbule alone is not man, but the Hypoftafis or 
whole man compounded of body and foule. The body of man (faith he) is the I- 
mageofthe world, and called therefore Microcofmus; but the Idea and exemplar of the 
world was firft in God, fo that man , according to his body muft necdes be the image 
ofGod. Againft which opinion of this learned man , his owne objection feemeth to 
me fufficicnt, where he alleageth , that it may be faid that Mefes fpake by the figure 
Synedoche, as when a man is called a mortall man , yet is not the whole man mortal!, 
but the body only : fo when God faid, Let vs make man after our image , hce meant ao 
thefouleof man, and not the bodic of earth and duft : Maledictvs quideitatcmadho- ' 
minis lineament a refert ( faith S.Avovstine,) Cur fed is he that referreth the Veitie 
of God to the lineaments of mans body. Deus enim non eft human* form* particeps, neque 
corpus humanum Aiuinx (faith Ph i to,) Godu not partaker of humane forme , nor hu- 
man: body of the forme dinine : The Hebrew word tor image is Tfelem,whkh fignifieth 
a fhadow .or obfeure refemblance: Inimagine pertrahfit homo , Man paffeth axcay in x 
^ ]badow : Let vs then know and confider, that God , who is eternall and infinite , hath 
1 not any bodily fhape or compofition , for it is both againft his nature and his word } 
an errour of the Anthropomorphic, againft the very eflence and Maieftie of God. 

Surely Cicero, who was but a Heathen , had yet a more diuine vnderftanding then , <j 
thc-fe groffe Heretikes : adfimilitudinem Deipropiiis accedebat humana virtw, qudm fi- 
gura, rhevmue whichisinman (faithhe) came nearer the fimilitude of God ', thenthe 
figure. For Godis afpirituall fubftance, inuifible, and moft fimple ; God is a iuft • 
God : God is mercifull : God is charitie it feife, and (in a word) goodneffeit felfe, and 
none elfe limply good. And thus much it hath pleafed God himfolfe to teach vs, 
and to make vs know of himfelfe. What then can be the fhadow of fuch a fubftance' 
the image of fuch a nature,or wherein can man be faid to refemble his vnexcogitable 
power and pcrfecrnefTc \ certainely , not in dominion alone : for the Deuill is faid to k 
be the Prince of this world, and the Kingdome of Chrift was not thereof, who was 
the true and perfect image of his Father; neither, becaufe man hath an immortall lo 
foule, and therein the faculties of Memorie, Vnderftanding, and Will; for the Deuils 
are alfb immortall, and participate thofe faculties, being called Dxnjones, becaufe 
fames of Knowledge, and fubtility ; neither becaufe we are reafonablecreatures,by 
which we are diftinguifhed from beafts : for who haue rebelled againft God ? who 
haue made Gods ofthevileft beafts, of Serpents, of Cats., of Owles, yeaeuenof 
lhamefull parts,of lulls and pleafures,but reafonablemen \ Yet doe I not condemne 
the opinion ofS^chryfoftome and Ambrofe, as touching dominion.but that,in refpeel 
tnercof, man was in fome fort after the image of God, if we take Domini on, fu chas^ 
it ough t to bee, tha tis, accompanied with iufticeandpietie .- for God did not only 
makeman!rruleran<rGouernouroucr the Fifties ofthe Sea, theFowles of Heauen 
(or of the aire) and oucr the Beafts of the field ; but God gaue vnto man a dominion 
oner men, he appointed Kings to gouerne them , and Iudges, to iudge them in equi- 
ne. N either doc I exclude reafon, as it is the abilitie of viTderftanding. For I doc not 
conceiue, that Iremm did therefore call man, the image of God, becaufeheewas 

animal 



t'ph.f, 1 2 



Tkt.inCratjit. 



Ofor'msdiJuU, 
M.1. 






5° 






J0« 

r.c -. 

r..v. 

0:.'.; 







^> 



y>w(>)^ \ : '^° 



Ch 



**i 



AP.2.V2. 



of the Hiftorie of the World. 



25 



. smmtrf^lec^yi out thathevnderftood it better, with Stbuu-w 

• efihenipreaammionemhabens ,M^tbat is enduedwitb rig ht reafon, U fadUn&m 

beGod (that ,s) by r^cafontoknowand confrffecfodhbS^Lfc 

U, Godmade m *n,in fetfeel of the intellect , after bis owne image andftSje Z 
^rtheimageofGod.mminde^xmth.thehadaminde ?*»?H**J*m^ 



10 




V<ems>sdtri 



«0. 



$. II. 

<?/>/*; mummBminie of man , in vtbich there u much of the imare 

of God : una t hut this image is much deformed by 

finne. 

Vt Afow is not taken here for mta. ;^« , according to ^,/, 

wnichis/arw/, z*/ #4/«r4 ^/»», The forme or nature of mm but this 

. fitculneorgiftofGod, called^, £ taken fe^JiS 

, principal fircngth of the minde, or foulc, «*» atlw eft per vet na vmtaiis 

• contemplate ; «^/, «7 exercife, or office, u the perpetual eo.tempUtL 

Efiautemmensnojlra (faith Cvsanvs) vts comprehendendi^totumvirtJeefZ' „ 
of comprehending euen the Me, that U in this hinde pcvcrfill, cLoundedoflThe 
accompameh.swordes) that he eneemeth.ttobetheveryeiTenceof "God wS h 
(fitthhe) thenthe Wit from the Sunne : fortius c^orvnderftand Sth 

meanmg istfacmagcofGodinman. ForastheSunnei LtoSfiSJS £#'' ,/5 

™™ththed,uinel^^ 

£r^ 0r Vn ^ rfta , ndln 8 ln me »> not ofthe effenceof Gods infinite vndeSdW 
buta power and facultie of our fculcs the pureft ; or the W, mimJt „ !l0 T u S J 

Sdidnekno'lT ^-^^^^^^^^^ontaptadeofS^ 

• X?/ ^ g °' ? *f «^/tf»*'"'«J**» ducmfeqmtur , which foUoweth 

xo SS ?' calI ?W, ^^^^thatpowerwhichtheU- 

4 SdnSnT^^ -^k^I •f CrCn , CC ' Rrafon «^^&culti"bywhichweiudgc 
and difcourfe ; l^*,^ by which we hue. Hereofitis faid, Ammampua ammatjd 
el,vwficafanim* or the foule is that which doth animate the body", tbatis, rfurttil 
Zw irju ' S T al ' ad0n o£bod y and foulc ; ™d the fame ffrength (/Tilth philo) 
wnicn God the great direftour hath in the world,the fame hath this Animafir mind 
01 toule in man ^«»» , fa that , by which we will and make eieftion 5 and to this 
Sa/U agreeth, wh.ch calleth this Mens fix diuine vndcrffemding, *«#/««« animeHr* 
tern, the perceiumg part of the minde, or the light, by which the Soule difcerneth -dor- 
mtentiummens, no „ amma,fopitur , ejr in furiofis mem extinguitur , anima mam In 
men thatfleepe it is this (mens) or vndtrfiandin^, and not the minde orfoule,whicb Mt tb 
5 o during which time it is but habituall in wife men, and in mjtdde men this (mens) is Tx- 
ttngui\bed, wdnot the Soule : for madde men doe liuc, thougTTdiftract 

Therefore this word being often vied for the Soule giuinglife . is attributed abn- 
raely tomadde men, when we % that they are ofa dif tract minde, in ftead ofa bro- 
ken vnderftonding, which word (mind) we vfcalfo for opinion, as, lam of thismind 

D or' 



)K rtV 



lt& 



»«« 






i6 



The fir ft- ( Boo{e of the fir ft part Cha r.z.§. 



or that mindc : and fbmetimes for mens conditions or vertucs , as , he is of an honeit 
minde, or, 'a man of a iuff minde : fbmetimes for affection , as I doe this for my minds 
fake; and Ariflotle fbmetimes vfith this word (mem) for the phantafie, which is the 
ftreligth of the imagination : fbmetimes for the knowledge of principles , which wc 
haue without difcourfe : oftentimes for Spirits, Angels, and fntelligcnces : but as it is • 
vfed in the proper fignification, including both the vndcrflanding agent and poffible, 
v it is defcribed to be a pure, fimple, fubftantiall aft , not depending vpon matter , but 
hauing relation to that , which is intelligible , as to his firft obiect : or more at large 
thus ; a part or particle of the Soule, whereby it doth vnderfland,not depending vp- 
pon matter, nor needing any organ, free from paffion comming from without , and 10 
apt to be diffeuered , as , eternall from that which is rnortall. Hereof excellently 
Mercurius: Animaefl imago mentis, mens imago Dei. Dew mentipr&ejl^mensanimx, 
animacorpori , The Sauk (meaning that which giueth life) is the image of this vnder- 
flanding, or Mens, and this (<-Mens) or vndcrflanding is the image of God. God is Prefi- 
dent or ruler oner this vndcrflanding, this vndcrflanding otter the Soule , and this Soule o- 
uer the body. This diuifion and diftinction out of the Flatonikes and Peripatetikes , I 
£&».«p.f. leauetothcReadertoiudgeof ThatUWens bumanahathnonccde of any organ, 
MarfiliusFicinm in his ninth booke of theSoulesimmortalitielabourethtoproue. 
Zdmb.de eper. Zanchius doth not differ from Ficinus in wordes , for (faith he) adfacultatemintelli- 
Bei.pa>t. 3 .iib. g mUm exercendam non eget Mens organo, tan film medio,fer quodintelligat,quanquam 20 
eget obieclcin quodintueatur, ejr ex quo intelleclionem concipiat : hoc nut em obieclttmfunt 
phintafmata,feii rerum Afenfibus perceptarumfimulachr a adphantafiamptolata , To ex- 
ercife thefacultie ofvnder/landing, the minde of man (faith he) needcth no inftrument, as 
a meane y by which it may vnderfland : but it needcth an obieel, whereon to lookc, and whence 
to conceiue the act of vndcrflanding. This obieB are thephantafmes, or the refemblances of 
things leceiued from the fenfc , and carriedtothe phantafie : But in effect his conclufion 
fecmeth to carry a comrade fenfc, when he milketh the Phan tafie.in reprefenting the 
obieel: to the vnderftanding, to be a corporall Organttm ; neither can it be vnderitood 
to be an Organum of any thing ; but'of the vnderffanding. And hee addeth that the 
refemblance of things in mans imagination , are to hisvnderffanding and minde, as 39 
colours are to the fight : whence it fo follow eth, that the imagination or phantafie it 
felfe is to thefacultie of vnderffanding, as the eye is to thefacultie of feeing, and as 
this is an Organum : Co that. Of this queftion, How the Minde in all her actions ma- 
keth vfeofthe body, and hath communion with the body, I referre the Reader to 
P«S. \%$.&fe- a mofl graue and learned difcourfe in the laft Replie ofM r . D r . £///£» ., now Bifhop 
{««/. of Winchefter, vnto Hcnrie Jacob. Howfoeuer the truth bee determined , wee muft 

conclude, that it is neither in refpect of reafbn alone , by which we difcourfe , nor in - 
refpect of the minde it felfe, by which we Hue, nor in refpect of our foulcs fimply, by 
which we are immortall, that wc are made after the image of God. But mofl f afely 
may wee referable our fclucs to God in nunte_, and in refpect of that pure facultic 40 
which is neuer feparate from the contemplation arid loue of God. Yet this is not all. 
For S c . Bernard maketh a true difference betweene the nature and faculties of the 
minde or Soule, and betweenethe infufion of qualities, endowments and gifts of 
grace, wherewith it is adorned and enriched, which, bcingadded to the nature, ef- 
fence, and faculties, maketh it altogether to be after the image ofGod, whofc words 



Act intngiittm 
D cicr fault il- 
htmjdeftJapU 

entix'yVirttitis, 
ac bmitatUcam- 
potem 3 qm jefc 



mmtm cnato- arc thefe : TJjn propter e a imago Dei eft, qui* Jut mtmimt Mens, J eg, intelhgit ey dm- 

rem agnofcerct 
fiiiw,atqiie imi 



rem agufcerct «•// (which was alfb the opinion of S. A v g v s t i n e) fed quia potefl meminiffe, intetli- 

m./itrmp'imi. <-> ^ ... . r. _.. .. ., . '. J . x * . •> . u 



urffprel Inge- g ere ac diligerc c am a quo facia e(l, (that is) The minde (or Mens) was not therefore the 
nyjrtHj, auBari- image of God, becaufe it remembreth, vnderflandeth , andloueth it felfe , but becaufe it can 
" '■tiime7"Ie' remn *ber, vnderfland, and loue God, who created it. And, that this image may be defor- 
med and made vnprofitabl e, heare Basil: Homo adimaginem & fimilitudincm Dei 
fatlus ef,peccatum verb' imaginis huim pulchritudinem deformauit,(jrinutilem reddidit, 
dum animam corrupt is concupifcentia amclibus immerfit, Man was made after the image 
And fmilitnde of God, but Swne hath deformed the beaut ic of this image, and made 

it 



tain 

fie rttttone fiude- 

ret. 

t-xanti. 



5° 



l 






fl> 










T 



K 



•M 



C h a v.%.§J. . e/ f he Biftorie of the World. 



2 7 



u 



vnprofitMe by drawing our mindes tnto corrupt comup fcence . 

It is not therefore (as aforefaid) by reafon of Immprtalitie, nor in Rea/on, nor in 
Dominion, nor in any one of thefeby itfelfe, nor in all theie ioyned, by any of 
which, or by ail which we referable, or may be called the fhadow of God .though 
by reafon and vndcrftanding, with the other faculties of the Soule , we are made ca- 



„ , ■ „.,..-„„*,.« ^ t "v^vwi,s,, ha. .in m.tuc tit- 

pable of this print ; but chiefly , in refpeft of the habit of Original! righteoufnefTe, 

/ infilled by God into the mindc and Soule of man in his firft creation' 






10 



moil perfectly infilled by i 

For ;t is not by nature, nor by herliberalitic, that wee were printed with the feale of 
Gods image(though Reafon may be laid to be ofher gift, which ioyned to the Soule 
is a part of the effentiall conftitunon of our proper Species ) but from the bountifull 
ctace ol the ^ r,y ^ r*£5\\ oi-i-irln^fC-. -,.,1*.^ k,.™.-u„j i:c :_^_ ., i ■ ; - . 



Lord of all goodneilc, who breathed life into earth, and contriued wit! 



y — -- - - .-o j .— -.vuiuvuiwuuuj, auu eonmueu with- 

in the trunckeof dull and clay, the inimitable habilitie ofhis owne mftice pictie ?nd 
riehteouineiTe. 



So long therefore ( for that relemblance which Dominion hath) doethof 



'(ethat 



*-4 



20 



Gw.jr.ii, 



7 



i-lfos'.S.: 



Jt^feo 



40 



d ; j — ~™«.».^w ..unNiyumuuimiuinj uoetnoiethat 

arc poweitullr ctamet ne rmageofGpd , as according to his Commandement- they 

cxercile the OmceoriMagiitracie to which they are called, and lincerely walkc in the 

waies of God , which m the Scriptures is called walking with God; and all other men 

f o long retainc this image, as they feare, louc, and ferue God, truly , (that is) for the 

loue of God alone, and doe not bruife and deface his feale by the waight ofmanifold 

and voluntarie offences, and obftinatefinnes. Forthevniuftmindc cannot bee after 

the image of God , feeing God is mftice it felfe \ The bloud-thirftie hath it not ■ for 

Godischanne, andmercieitlelfe.-Fallhood, cuniiingpraffife, and ambition ' are 

properties of Satban ; and therefore cannot dwell in onefoule , togetherwith God • 

and to be ihort, thereis no likelihood betweene pure light and blacke darkened be' 

tweene beautie and deformitic, or betweene righteoufheiTe and reprobation And 

though Nature, according to common vndcrftanding, hauemade vs capabl c by 'the 

power of reafon, and apt enough to receiue this image of Gods goodnefle, which the 

ienluallfou esof beafts cannot percciue ; yet were that aptitude naturall more mcli- J„, 

nabletofollowandimbnacethefalfeanddureleirepleafuresofthisfta^ 

thentobecometheflaadowofGod by walking after him, hadlAfeSSI^fe' "P e ^\ 

workemanfhipof Gods wifedome , and theliberalit.e of h.s mercy, formed eye "l^\ C ^^'fl 

ourfonles,astoou.r bodies, which, p.ercing through the impurit^ofourflenr be- l^^Jf^S I 

intrn ^"f^ firailltud < * ^herr Creatour , preKrJ vndefiled and 
vnrentthegarmentof the new man, winch, afterthe image of God , is created in 

&^^ tn ff U&t V 6iASt ' P ' it Nowwhereasitisthou'htby 
finne thenS^ ^? A ^gf» with whom S.c^^ioyneth, that, by 
tone, the perfedhonof theimage isloft, and not the image it felfe; both opinions by 

b tat „' r n n ^ *? We l re COndkd (t ° ^ *" the ™*& «*&* * JSS 

beakntwowaies; for eithent is confidcred, according to naturall gfts, andconfi! 
fteth therein : namely, to haue areafonableand vndcrftanding nature^.' and m this 

fcndingnature, &c. aloft: (for finne doth not abolifli and take away thefe natural 

gfsor,tneimageofGod.sconfidered,accordingtofu P ernatura!lg.i, namely of 
dminegrace, and heauenlyglorie, which is indeede the perfeef.on and accompli 

who lv J T ! ' a11 '^ 8C ' and this manner of fimilitude and image of Go P d is 
wholly blotted out and deftroyed by finne. ' 



■'r.3.9. 



S. Jlmbrof, 



8 Bi 



t*> 



E r j : 
c6S, 


1 


p CO 


- 






hut 
& s y 

ill 


[ 

8 
E 

■1 

S 

i 

s 



D 2 



$. III. 






^tSrn 



<r~ 



j.^^-iS^^A 



28 



The fir ft e Boo{e of the fir ft part 



C H A P.2. §".3* 



)^- 



nut. f. it 6 - 



Job 4.V.17. 




^77 



JoJ io.il.l7.' 
'3- 



EccZ.ii.14. 



0/«r ty* mifnik bodies ; and that the care thereof tyouli 
jecld to the immortaU Soulc. 

He external! man God formed out of the duft of the earth or atcor- 
K S;™elgnitkationoftheword,^^of ^W,,oteldc earth 

earth and water, nonexquahbethumojedexghapharadamath (>deft) 
C^ ex pinguifma & mollifima, Not th.it Go A made an Im*gt_ £*£%££% 

^ThatMan was formedof earth and duft, did ^«*«» acknowledge, whenin 
humblefearehecalledvntoGod,tofaue5^. ^K^^^rT IT^fflL 
ff rM.iJccordingto/^andthoughourownceyesdoceu.y 

whe'rebehold the fudden and refiftleife affauits ofdeath and Nature ailurethvs by 

ncuer^^ 

onthe^ 
uuesofpameandifeafes^ndourMmdestheHiuesorvnnumbredcares.forrowes, 

"Sons: and that (when we are moft glorified) we are butthofe painted pofts, M 

oC^nition.andthedarkeignorancc, which co^ 

^Xtwej^n^^ 

altogether CoT^on^cr^c^^ imprifoncd immortall 

Soule, which eanneitherd.ew.th the reprobate , norperin^ththernortalfparts 

crdf«lforeuerrnore,astheeuer-liuingfubieasofhisrewardandpunifliment. But 
when is it that wc examine this great accompt J neuer while wc haue one vamtie letc 
vs tofpend :wcpfcadc for titles, till our breath fiiilcvs; digge for riches, while our . 
ftrengthenablethvs, exercile malice, while wc can reuengcj and then, when Time 30 • 

the hsnfc ofold age, we remember witlT^tnat we mufl goe the way, from whence we 
%d not relume, andthatjur bedde is madejuiyforvs in thedarke- And then Hay, 
looking oucr late into thebottome ofour confeience ( which Pleafure and Ainbia- . 
on hadlockcd vp from vs all our Hues, we behold therein the fearefull images ofour 
actions paft, and withall, this terrible infenption : That Codwtll bring euery worke w- 
to iudrement, that man hath done vnder the Sunne. ■ 

But what examples haue eucr moucd vs ? what perfwafions reformed vs ? or what _ 
threatningsmadevsafraidc ? wc behold other mens Tj^ies plaid before vs, we 
heare what is promifed and threatned: but the worlds bright glone hath put out the 40 
eyes ofour minds; and thcfebetrayinglights, (with which wc only fee) doe neither 
lookevp towards termelefle ioyes, nor downc towards endlcfle forrowes till we 
neither know, nor can look for any thing elfe , at the worlds hands. Or which ex- 
cellently Marine Victor : 

7{jl hofles , nil din fames , nil denife morhi 
Egerunt , fuimue , qui nunc fumm , yjfc periclis 
Tentati , nihilo meliores reddimur vnquam 3 
Sub Vitus nulla cidfarum fine manentes. 



Difeafes, famine, enemies, in vs no change haue wrought, 
What erft we were, we are ; ftill in the fame fhare caught : 
No time can our corrupted manners mend, 
In Vice we dwell, in Sinnethat hath no end. 



5 a 



But 




huli 






accor. 



ft 



***«! 



"»7« 



& 



W/«;«/ (!) 



owledae 



to»k 



> wSenj 



fe our times vp- 
rtieAnd- 

trucvnhappineffe 

lO/OHrrocteftin. 
ijatiyindfbrget 

lioncd immortal! 
the mortal! parts 

her is ex- 
pitiment. But 
BKOKwiticleft 

Meour , 
dthciyvhenTimc^ 

vJMterii ! 

:;■/;«« 



of out 



h a p. 2.^4. o/f/6<? Hijione oftbeWorld. 



2p 






to 



But let vsnot flatter our immortall foulcs herein : for to neglefl: God all ourliues 
and know that we negle.fr him, to offend God voluntarily , and know that we offend' 
him, calling our hopes on thePcacc, which wetrufttomakeat parting, is no other 
then a rebellious preemption, and (that which is the worftof all) euen a contemp- 
tuous laughing to fcorne, and deriding of God , his lawes and precepts. Fruftrd fbe- 
rant, qui fie de mifcricordia Dciftbi blandiuntur, They hope in vame , iaith B £ a. n a k. d 
which in this fort flutter themfelues with Gods mercy. 



Btrn m P/. 
habitat. 



10 




$. 1 1 1 1. 

Of the Spirit of life, which Ged breathed into man, in his Creation. 

N this frame and carcafe God breathed the breath of life i and the man 
f was a huing foule ; (that is) God gaue to a Bodie of earth and of corrup- 
' tible matter, a Souleipirituall and incorruptible.; not that God had a- 
[ ny fuch bodilicinftrumcntsas men vie, but God breathed the Spirit of 

life and immortalkic into man, as he breatheth his grace daily into fuch 
asloueandfearchim. The Spirit of God (faith Elih^ih Iob) bath made me , and 

2 O the breath of the Almightic hathgiuen me life : In quafentehtia (faith Raisnts) vi- 

tavda e'stpaupertasfenfis carnalis, tie forte putemtts Veum , velmambus corporeis de lima 
jormajfe corpus hominti, vcl faucibus aut UbfsfuU wfyirajfe in futem formats, <vt v lucre 
{opt, &[piraculum viu habere \Nem& Prophet a cum ait, Manns tutfeccrunt me, cjre. 
tropica hue locutione magis quaw propria, (id eft) iuxn confuetudincm, quafolent homines 
eperari, loquutm eft. In which fentence (faith he) the beggerlineffe of camall ' fenfe is to be 
auoided, left perhaps wefyonldtbinke , either that God with bodily hands made mans body of 
pme,orbreathedwithiawes or lips vpott his face (being formed) that he might Hue , and 
hue thejpiril of life -.for the Prophet dfo when he faith, Thy handes hme made me , fpake 
this tropically, rather then properly (that is) according to the mflonte which men vfe in wor* 

3 o k '»g- Quantum eft periods hijs, qui Scrip tar as fenfu corporeo legunt : In wh.it danger are 

they that reads the Scriptures m a car nail fenfe. By this breath was infufed into man 
both lifeand foule; and therefore this (Soule) the Philofophers call Anttnam, que 
•vittificat corpus, & animat, which doth animate, andgiue life to the body. The infpiration 
of the ■^ilmightie giuetb vnderjlandwg, faith lob ; and this Ipint, which God breathed 
into man, which is the reasonable foule of man, returneth againe to God that gaue it, 
as the body returneth vnto the earth, out of which it was taken , according to Eccle- 
flaps : Lsfnd dust jball returne to the earth, out of which it wm taken , and the fpirit jhll 
jj 2 /x, returne to Ged that gaue it. Neither is this word ( Spirit ) vfually other wile taken in 
the Scriptures, then for the foule ; as when. Stephen cry cA vnto God .- Domine fufcipe 
4 o/piriium mam, Lordlefus recemc my f fir it : and in SM o h n, And lefts bowed his head, 
andgauevp the Ghoft, or fpmt, (which was) that his life and foule left his bodydead. 
And that the immortall foule of man differcth from the foulcs of beafts, the manner 
of the creation makcth it manifeft : for it is written, Let the waters bring forth in abun- 
dance euery creeping thing, and let the earth bring forth the Huing thing, according to his 
kinde, the beafl oft he earth, &c. But of Man it is written, Let vs make man in our owne 
image,a-c and further, that the Lord breathed in his face breath of life: Wherefore,as 
from ithe waterand earth were thofe creatures brought forth, and thence receiued 
lite .- fo fhall they againe be diffolucd into the fame firft matter, whence they were ta- 
ken .- but the life of breath euerlafting, which God breathed into man , fhall , accor- 
5 o di ng to Ecclefiaftes, returne againe to God that gaue it. 



i'hi- - 



Zcclcf.il.?. 



Gen . 
Gcn.1.7. 



Pccl.ll.7. 



D 



*; V. 




HA_0w-%V 






The fir ft < Boo{e of the fir fl part Cha p.2. §j. 




io 



UriJl.Thyf. lib. 
8. cap.i. 
I.I7.f. 

Epift. 

Omnisinhomme 
creatrtra, &\cx- 
lum e> terra. 
Aug.l.ept. 83.4. 
£7. rttr. 1.1, a. 



Qnid.Met.1.1. 



$. V. 

That Munis (asitwere) a little world: with a digrepon touching 
our mortalitie. 

An, thus compounded and formed by God, was an abftraft or model!, 
or bricfe Storie of the Vniuerfall : in whom God concl uded the crea- 
tion, and worke ofthe world, and whom he made the laft and moft ex- 
cellent of his creatures, being internally endued with a diuine vnder- 
ftanding, by which he might contemplate and ferue his Creatour,after 
whofeimage he was formed, and endued with thepowers and faculties ofreafon and 
other abilities, that thereby alfo he might goucrne and rule the world , and all other 
Gods creatures therein. And whereas God created three forts of liuing natures, (to 
wit) Angelicall, Rationall , and Brutall ; giuingto Angels an intelleetuall, and to 
Beafts a fenfuall nature , he vouchfafed vntoman , both the intellcftuall of Angels, 
the fenfitiue of Beafts , and the proper rationall belonging vnto man ; and therefore 
(faith G r. e g o k. i e N a z 1 a n z e n e : ) Homo efl vtriufy naturx vinculum, Man is the 
bond and chmne which tilth together both natures : and becaufe in the little frame of 
mans body there is a reprcientation ofthe Vniuerfall, and (by allufion) a kind of par- 
ticipation of all the parts thereof, therefore was man called Microcofmos, or the little 
world. Bens igitur hominemfaBum,velut alterum quendam mundumjn breui magnum ; 20 
at que exiguo totum , in term flatuit , God therefore placed in the earth the man whom he 
had made, <m it were another world, the great and large world in the [mall 'and little world'. 
for out ofearth and duft was formed the flcfti of man , and therefore heauie and lum- 
pifli; the bones of his body we may compare to the hard rockes and ftones,and there- 
fore ftrong and durable ■ of which Ouid : 

■ Inde genus durum fumu-s, experienf£ laborum, 
Et document a damus, qua fimus origine nati. 



From thence our kinde hard-hearted is, enduring paine and care, 
Approuing, that our bodies of a ftonic nature are. 



30 






hiyrr 



His Iploud, which difperfeth it felfe by the branches of veines through all the bo- 
die, may be rcfcmbled to thole waters, which are carried by brookes and riuers ouer 
all the earth : his breath to the aire ; his naturall heate to theincloled warmth, which 
the Earth hath in it felfe, which ftirrcd vp by the heate ofthe Sunne, affifteth Nature 
■ | H „, , f.i i ^U n ^c fpecdier procreation ofthofe varieties , which the Earth bringeth forth ; Our 
radicall moifture,oile, or Balfamum (whereon the naturall heat feedeth and is main - 
. . tained) is refembled to the fat and fertilitie ofthe earth ; the haires of mans body, 

which adornes or ouerfhadowes it , to the grafTe,which couereth the vpper face and 4D 

skin ofthe earth ; our generatiue power, to Nature, which produceth all things ; our 

determinations,to the lighr,wandring,and vnftablc clowds,carried euery wherewith 

tyd. vncertainewinds;oureies,to the light ofthe Sunne andMoone,and the beauty ofour 

youth,to the flowers ofthe Spring, which, either in a very fliorttime, or with the 

Sunnes heat drie vp,& wither away,or the fierce puffes of wind blow them from the 

ivt^w/P'i'ksithe thoughts of our mindc; to the motion of Angels; and our pure vnderftan- 

"" ding(formerly called Mens,ax\d that which alwaies lookcth vpwards) to thofe intel- 

vn£ S left uall natures,which arealwayes prefent with God;and laftly our immortal fbules 

A, ^<- (while they are righteous) are by God himfel fe beautified with the title of his own 

image and limilitude: A nd although, in refpedt of God,thcre is no man iuft,or good, 

'J- job 4. 18. or righteous : (for in Angelis deprdhenfa e'stflultitia, Behold,be found folly in his Angels, 

(faith lob) yet with fuch a kind ofdifference , as there is betweene the fubftance, and 

thcihadow.theremaybefoundagoodneireinman: which God being pleafcdto 

accept, hath thcrforc called man,thc image andTimilitude of his owne rightcoufhes. 

*" ~" ~ In 



M 



50 



50 



J? 








Jthe % 



%"**, 



Wo/Ufa 



north 



Aufl.ioJUi. 



C h a p ,z.§-1' °f^ je Hijlorie of the World. 

In this alio is the little world of man compared, and made more like the Vmuerlall 
(man being the mcafure of all things; Homo eft men/urn omnium rcrum, faith Ariftotle 
and P/^^w) that the fbure complexions refemblethefoure Elements, and the '¥'■'■'■/'• 
feuen Ages of man the feucn Planets: Whereof our Infancie is compared to the 
Moone, in whichwefeemeonelyto Hue and growe, as Plants; the fecondagcto 
UWercark, wherein we are taught and inftruef ed; our third age to Vcmu, the dayes of 
lpue, defirc, and vanitie; the fourth to the Sunne > the ftrong, rlourilhing, and beauti- 
fufTage of mans life; the fifth to Mars, in which we feeke honour and victorie,and i a 
which our thoughts trauaile to ambitious ends; thefixthage is afcribedto/o/vVer, 
i o in which we begin to take accompt of our times, iudge ofour fellies, and grow to the 
jjcrfection ofour vndcrftanding; the laft and feuenth to Sttturne, wherein our dayes 
are fad and ouer-caft, and in which wee iindeby decrc and lamentable experience, 
and by the lode which can neuer be repaired , that ofaljour vaine pafsions and affe- 
ctions paft,.thc ferrowonely abidcthjOur attendants are ficknefies7and variable in- 
firmities; and by how much the more we are accompanied with plentic, by fo much 
the more greedily is our end defired,whome when Time hath made vnfbciable to 
2.g others, we become a burthen to our felues : being ofno other vfe , then to hold the 
riches we haue, from our fucceilburs. In this time it is, when (as afbrefeid) we, for 
the mod part, and neuer before, prepare for our eternall habitation, which we paflc 
10 on vnto, with many fighes, grones, and fad thoughts, and in the end , by the workc- 
manfhip ofdeath, fanilfa the fbrrowfull bufineffe ofa wretched life , towards which 
we alwayes trauaile both fieeping and waking : neither haue thofe bcloued compa- 
nions ofhonourand riches any power at all, to hold vs any one day, by the promifes 
of glorious entertainments; but by what crooked path Co euer wee walkc , the fame 
leadeth on directly to thehoufe ofdeath: whofe doores lie open at all houres, and to 
all perfbns. For this tide of mans life, after it once turneth and declineth , cuer run- 
neth with a perpetuall ebbe and filling flreame, but neuer floweth againc : our 
leafe once fallen, fpringcth no more, neither doth the Sunne or the Summer adome 
vs againe, with the garments ofne w leaues and flowers. 

Redditur &rhoribu4 farm; rtttirentibus xtas, 
Ergmonhomini, quod fuit ante , redit. 

To which I giuc this fenfe, 

The Plants and trees made poore and old 
By Winter enuious, 
The Spring-time bounteous 
Couers againe, from fhame and cold: 
But neuer Man repaifd againe 
His youth and beautie loft, 
4° Though art, and care, and cofl, 

Doe promife Natures helpe in vaine, 

And of which 

Catvllvs, Epigram. 53. 
Soles occidere dr redirefoffunt : 
Nobis cum femel occidit breuis lux„ 
Nox eft perfctua vnx dormundn. 

The Sunne may fet and rife : 
But we contrariwife 
5° Sleepeafterourfliortlighr. 

One euerlafting night. 

For if there were any baiting place, or reft, in thecourfe or race of mans life, then, 
according to the dodtrine of the ActdemickeS) thefame might alio perpetually bee 

main- 




Tkefirfi "Booke of the fir jl part Cha t.z.§.6.j 

maintained ; but as there is a continuance of motion in naturall liuing thing* andas 
the fappe and myce, wherein the life of Plants is preferued,doth euermore afcend or 
defcend : to is it with the life of man, which is aJwaies cither encreafing towards ripc- 
neffe and perfofhon, or declining and decreafing towards rottenneiTeanddiflblu- 
tion. 



JUekf.i J. if 



£. VI. 

Of the free power, which man had m his firft creation, to difpofe 
of himfelfe. 



10 




&Uis!>.7.iU 



Mattb.5.7. 



Hefe be the miferies which our firft Parents brought on all mankinde, 
vn to whom God in his creation gaue a free and vneonftramed will and 
[ on whom he bellowed the liberal! choice of all things , with oneonly 
r prohibition, to trie his gratitude and obedience. Godfetbeforehim a ' 
mortall and immortall life, a nature celeftiall and terrene,and (indeed) 
God gaue man to himfelfe, to be his owne guide, his owne workeman, and his owne 
painter, that he might frame or defcribevnto himfelfe what hee pleated, and make 
election of his owne forme. God made man in the beginning (faith Suacibe s)and 
left him in the hands of his own counfaile. Such was theliberalitieof God,and mans fe- 
licitie- whereas bcafts, and all other creatures reafbnleffe brought with them into lc> 
the world (faith Lucilim) and that euen when they firft fell from the bodies oftheir 
Dammes, the nature, which they could not change; and the fupernall fpirits or An- 
gels were from the beginning, oribonc after, of that condition, in which they re- 
mained, pcrpetuall eternitie. But fas afore/aid; God gaue vnto man all kindeof 
i cedes and grafts of life, £0 wit; the vegetatiue life oTPlants, the fenfuall ofbeaftcs 
therationall ofman, and themtellectuall of Angels, whereofwhich foeuer hetooke 
pleafurc to plant and cultiue, the fame fbould futurely grow in him, and bring forth 
fruit, agreable to his owne choyce and plantation. This frcedome of the firft man 
Adam, and our firft Father, was enigmatically defcribedby Uffdepm Athenienfis ?o 
(LuthM/randuIaJm theperfon and fable of Proteus, who was faid, as often as hec 
pleated, to change his fhape. To the lame end were all thofe celebrated Metlmor- 
fhofes among the Py thagorians, and ancient Pox:ts, wherein it was fained , that men 
were transformed into diucrs fliapes of beafts , thereby to fhew the change ofmens 
conditions, from reafbn to brutalitie, from vertue to vice , from meekenefle to cru- 
cltie, and from iuftice to oppreision. For by the liuely image of other creatures did 
thofe Ancients reprcfent the variable pafsions, and affections of mortall men; as by 
Serpents were fignified decciuers; byLions, oppreffours, and cruell men; by fwine, • 
men gmen ouer to luft and fenfualitie; by wolucs, rauening and greedy men ; which ' 
alfo S. Matthew refembleth to Bile PropEe Fs, which come to you infyeepesc(cthin<r,but 40 
inwardly they are rauening tVolues, by the images offtpnes_and ftockes, foolifh and' ig- , 
norant men, by Vipers, vngratefull men : ofwhic'hSaint IohnBapkst, Oyee .' 
generation of vipers, cjre. 






Jaba J, 17. 



\- VI1 - 

Of Gods ceafing to create any more : andofthecaufc thereof, becatife the 
Vniuerfall created was exceeding good. 

\ N this workc ofman God finifhed the creation; not that God laboured 
''as a man, and therefore rcftcdr for God commanded, and it was fini- 
- med, Cui vcluiffe eft feci fe, with whem, to will is to make, faith Be da. Wei- 
l thcr did God fo reft, that hee left the world made, and the creatures 
therein to themfelues; for my father worktth to this day (faith chriH) andlworke; but 

God 




5<3 







C h a p.$. §.i . oft he Hiflorie of the World. 



God refted, ("that isj he created no new /pedes or kinds of creatures, but fas afbre- 
|aid; gaue vnto man a power gencratiue, and Co to the reft of liuing creatures , and 
to Plants and flowers their feedes in thcmfelues; and commanded man to multiply 
and fill the earth, and the earth and -Sea to bring forth creatures according to their 
feucrall kinds: all wfflch being finiihed, God few that his workes were o od ■ not 
that he fore-knew not, and comprehended not the beginning and end before they 
were; for God made euery Plant ofthe field before it was in the earth, but he <=aue 
to all things which he had created the name of good , thereby to teach men , that 
• from fo good a God there was nothing made, but that which was perfect good,and 
10 from whofe fimple puritic and from fo excellent a caufe, there could proceedeno 
impure or imperfect effect. Formanhauinga free wil^and liberall choyce, pur- 
, chafed by difobedience his ownc death and mortalitie, and for the crucltie ofmans 
heart,,was the earth afterward curfed, and all creatures of the firft age deftroied : but 
the righteous man Tioah, and his famiiie, with thofe creatures which the Arke con- 
tained, referued by God to rcplenifh the earth. 



no 



Chap. II I. 
Of the place ofTaraciife, 5 



T. 



$. I. 

That the feat e ofVaradife U greatly mi {Ink en : and that it is no 
maraaile that men fbauld erre. 

Onchning the firft habitation of man wercade^ 
that the Lord God planted* garden, Eafiward, inEdcn, 
and there he put the man whom he made, Gen. i. 6, 
Of this feate and place of Paradife, all ages haue held 
difpute: and theopinions and Judgements haue been 
in effect, as diuers, among thofe that haue written vp- 
pon this part of Gene/Is, as vpon any one place therein, 
feeming moft obfeure • feme there arc, that hauecon- 
ceiued the being of the terreftnall Paradife, without 
all regard ofthe worlds Geographic, and without any 
refpeftofEaftandWeft, oranyconfideration ofthe 
place where Mofes wrote , and from whence he directed (by the quarters of the hea- 
uens) thewayhowtofindeoutandiudge, in what region of the world this garden 
was by God planted, wherein he was exceeding refpeftiue and precife. Others, by 
being themfelucs ignorant in the Hebrew, followed the firft interpretation , or tru- 
Iting to their ownc Judgements, vnderftood one place for another; andoneerrouris %* <cm-< 
i otraitroll, as it begctteth a thoufand children , if the licentioufheffe thereof bVnot (C'l ,tiv,vf ' 
. ^timely reftrained. And thirdly, thofe writers which gaue themfelucs to follow and 
177 a u M j ° thcrs ' werc in a11 thin S s fo °bferuant feftatours of thofe Matters , whom 
!a I ? v ' red and bcIeeuc d in , as they thought it fifrr to condemn? their owne vn- 
> 5<\derftanding,then to examine theirs. For (faith Vadianmxn his Epiftle of Paradft) 
magnos errorcs (magnorum virorum aucloritateferfuaft) tranfmittimm , we paffe oner 
many grofe errours , by tin author itie of great menkdde and perfwaded. And it is true, 
that many ofthe Fathers were farre wide from the vnderftanding of this place. I 
. ipeake it not, that f my felfe dare prefume to cenfure them,for I reuerence both their 




> (far>~**^ /j>z? res 



■ T-t<j- 



■vw 



<fn'foi 



learning 




ryulk 



T0-r 



-f^ 



■<r^-C^r' 



54- 



c ri:efirjl c Bockeofthefirfipart C h a p.^.^.z. 



.O 6*£ 



learning and their pietie , and yet not bound to folic w them any farther , then they 
are guided byjruth ; for they were men ; Ft humanism eft err ire. And to the end 
. that no man Should be proude of himfelfc , God hath dilh'ibutcd vrito men liich 1 
proportion of knowledge, as the wiieft may behold in thcmlclues their owne wcake- , 
nefle. N'uff[v!iguMiJedtLi?^iAE£M< > _Cod netier gaue the knowledge of dithingi to any 
one. SOWconfeft that he knew not , whether he were taken vp into the third hca- 



Mntt.i^£. 



Judc Ep.v 
lab z8.n. 

'3- 

4.. 8. 



-7. 



I 






2SS £ 



- 

o 

"H 



ya[. «$. 



uen in the flefh, or out of the flefh ; and Chrift himfelfc acknowledgeth thus much, 
that neither Men, nor Angel:; knew of the latter day ; and therefore, feeing know- 
ledgcls infinite, it is God (according to S 1 . fade) who is only wife. Sapientia <ubi inut- 
nitur? (faith Ion) butwhere isxoifcdcme found? andivhcre is the place of vnderftanding ? 
mtm knewelh not the price thereof for it is not found in the kndof the lining. And there- 
fore feeing God found follie in his Angels, mens iudgements (which inhabite in 
houfes of clay) cannot be without their miftakings: and fo the Fathers, and other 
learned men excufable in particulars , elpecially in thofe whereupon our faluation 
dependeth not. 



*. II. 

A recitall of ftrmge opinions, touching Paradife. 






10 



20 




Bufta/ifemi. 
Z.i.143- 



Jmb. dt Turn 



O w as touching Paradife, firft it is to be enquired , whether there were 
| a Paradife ex no I or whether Aft3/fo delcription were altogether myfti- 
, call, and allegorical! ? as Origen, Philo, Fran. Georgia* with others hauc 
affirmed, and that vnder the names of thofe foure Riuers, Pifon, Gehon, 
^ Hidekel, and Pcrath, The tree of life., and the tree ofknotvledge,thcrQ were ~^C 
deliuercd vnto vs other myfterics and fignilications ; as, that by the foure Riucrs 
were meant the foure Carclinall vertues, luliice, Temperance, Fortitude, and Prudence, 
or (by other) Oile, Wine, Milke , and Honnic. This Allegoricall vnderftanding of 
Paradife by Origen diuulged, was agairie by Fvancifcw Georgius receiucd (faith Stxtus 
Sentnfis) whole friuolous imaginations Sixtus himfelfc doth fully and lcarncdlyan- 30 
fwere, in the 3 4. Annotation of his fift Bookc, fil. 338. the laft Edition. 

S*. Ambrofe alfb leaned wholly to the Allegoricall conftrudlion, and let Paradife in 
the third heauen, and in the vertues ofthemmde, &innoftroprincipali, which is, as 
I conceiue it, inmctite, or in our fbules : to the particulars whereof he alludeth in this 
fort. Bytheplaccor garden of Paradife , was meant the fbule or minde; by Adam, 
Mens, or vnderftanding ; by£«<?, thefenfe; by the Sejgent, delectation; by the - 
Tree ofgood and euill, Sapience; and by the reft of the trees, the vertues of the 
minde, or in the minde planted, or from thence fpringing. NotwitManding all 
which, vpon the firft of the Corinthians , c. c^hejndireft wordes alloweth both_of a 
celeftiallandterreftriallP^^^; the one, into which S t .Patd was.rapt; the other, 40 
into which Adam was put by God . Aug chrjfmenfts, was of opinion, that a Paradife - 
hadbeene, but that there was not now any marke thereof on the earth : the fame 
being not only defaced , but withall the places now not fo much as exifting. To 
%vhich Luther kemevh to adhere. 

The Manhhees alfb vnderftood, that by Paradife was meant the whole Earth ; to 
which opinion Vadianm inclineth , as I conceiue his wordes in two feuerall places. 
s Firft, vpon this : Fill the earth, Gen. 10. Ofwhich he giueth this iudgement. Hoc ipf> 
etiam quod dixit , Replete terram , dominamim vnitterfis animantibw , fubtjcite terrain, 
tUriftme docet, tot am terram extantem, fyomnigems (vt turner at ) frutlibusconfitam, 
fedem & hortum illud Ad<t&pe(leritatis futura ftiiffe, ihcfewordes (faithhe) inwhich 50 
Godfaid, Bring forth fruit andmultiplie, andfillthe earth, and fubdue it , andrule cuer e- 
tiery creature, doe clearly fyew, that the Vniuerfall earth fet or filled with all forts of fruits 
(as then it was), tcastbe garden and feateof Adam, andof his future poHeritie. And 
afterward he acknowledgeth the place, out ofthe Ails the 1 7. Apoplwexvnofn- 

guint 














^^^^^^•^^ 



l \ 



>i. 






><**, 



!i ' ! v. 



van- ]o 






10 



20 



3° 



Chap.?. §.i. of the Hijlorie of the World. 

guint omne genu* humanum adeofaclum docet, vt habitarentfifer vniuerjamfaciem ter- 
rx:totaigitur terra Paradtftu tile erat-, The Apoftle (faith he) teacheth,that Cod hath made 
oj <t*e ■bloud*!lmankmde,todwiiouerall the face of the earth -.and there! ore all the earth 
(filth he) was that Paradife. Which conjectures I will anfwcrcin order. Gmpim 
Bccanus diiiereth not much from this opinion,butyct he acknowledged! that Adam 
was hrft planted by God in one ccrtaine place , and peculiar Garden ; which place 
Gtrvpiw hndeth nearcthc Riuerof Acefmes, in thcconfinesof/W/'a. 

TertnUian, Bomueniure, and Durandus, make Paradife vnder the ^Equinoctial!, and 
PopUm s\a\K contrane vnder the North pole: the cbaldtans alfb for the molt part 
and all their Senators, followed thcopinion oiOngen, or rather Orinn theirs, who 
would either rnakeW^afigure,orSacramentonly,orelfe would haueitfeated 
out of tmsfenlible world, or railed into fome hiah and remote Region ofthe Aire 
Strabrn , and Rah an us , were both lick of this vanitic, with Origin, and Philo ■ (o was 
our venerable Beda, and Pet.Comeftor, and Mofcs Barcephas the Syrian, tranflated by 
^»-Butas/ft^wraiesof/»A/&y«^^,thnthewondrcd^ww*««»„^2 rf J. 
By what emit Angel he was blowne vf into this errour : fo can I not but greatly mcruaile 
at thefe learned men, who lo grofly and blindly wandred ; fccinguw»/«, and after 
him the Prophas,doeib plainly defcribe this place, by the Region ,in which it was 
planted, by the Kingdomes and Prouinccs bordering it , by the R iuers which wa- 
tered it, and by the points of the compaffc vpon which it lay, in refpeft of ludsu or 
Canaan, r ' 

^ouiomagusalCo, vponBeda, Denatura r«w,bcleeucth thatall the Earth wasta 
ken for Paradife and not any one place. Forthe whole Earth (faith hee) hath the 
fame beau tic adfenbed to Faradifi. He addeth , that the Ocean was that fountaine 
from whence the oure lliuers, Pifon, Gehon, Tigris, and Euphrates, had their begin-' 
nmg : for he could not thinke it poffible, that thefe R iuers of Gates, Nilw tirk 
and Euphrates, (where.f the one ranne through India, the other through Utypr 
and the other two through X'efopotamia and Armenia) could rifcoutofonefoun- 
taine, were it not out of the fountaine ofthc Ocean. 



V 



Sirl.j6.ne. 



Kid. in Gin. 
Pei.Comefl l.i. 

cap]. 

MofisBan.dt 

Par. 




$. III. 

That there was a true locall Paradife Eaftward, in the Countrie of Eden. 

I O the firft therefore, thatfucha place there was vpon the earth, the 
wordsof^makeit manifeft,whercit is written. AndthelordGod Gl „c ■ 
flat neda garden Eaftward in Eden, and there he put the man whom he had 
madt^j And howf ocuer the vulgar transition, called Ilteromes tranf- 
Jation, hath conuerted this place thm,Plantauerat Dominus Bern Para- 
4 difumvohptattstprmcipio ; The Lord God planted 'a Paradife of pleafurefrom the begin- 
ning; putting the word (pleafure) for Eden, and (from the beJnnL) for Eaftward- 
It is mamfeft, that m this place Eden is the proper name ofa Region.For what fenfe" 
hath this tranflation (f aI th our Uopkmsjn his Trcatife oi Paradife) that be planted a 
garden in pleafure,or that a Riuer went out of pleafure to water thegarden? But the 
feuenne Interpreters call it ParadtfumEdcnis , the Paradife of Eden, aWodothrhe 
cW^»/>^^ truly take it for the proper name of a place, and for a Nowne 
appe lanue ; which Region.in refpeft of the fertilitie of the foile.of the many beau 
tifull nuers,and goodly woods.and that the trees (as in the /,«>«] doe alwaiesk^ 
their leaues, was called Eden, which fignifieth in the/*W,plcafantncflc or deli A 
jo c>e,asthe^4 W ^call the Countrie, oppofite to the Jfteof C uba,FlorHa-and h sis 

them.ftak I ng,wh 1 ch may end thedifpute,as touching thedoublefenfcofthe word 
that as Florida was a Countrie, fo called for the flourifhing beautie thereof llZnl 

B Tc 1 \?§ ,0 " fl calie iP ,eaf «^0'-^lieacie,for the pleafure,ordelicacie : and as Flo- 
rida fign:heth flounlhing : fo Eden figniheth pleafure , and yet both are the proper 

names 



5 SISSI. 



3* 



Thefir/l c Boo{e ofthe firjl part Chap.^. §$. 






I 



6<».}.»4- 



, ass 

ri3 - 



IO 



names of Countries ; for Eden being the proper name ofa Region ( called Pleafure 
in the Hebrew) and Paradife being the choice feat of all that Region , Paradife was 
truly the Garden offhand truly the Garden of pleafure. 

Now, for Eaftward, to tranflatcit,ySw»^ beginning, it is alfocontrarietotnc 
tranflation of the Seuentie ; to the ancient Greeke Fathers,as Bafil,Chryfoftome,Thee- 
doret, Grerorie; sndtothcRabbines , asRamban, Rabbi Salomon , R.Abraham,m& 
Chimchi; and of the Zatines, Seuermus^amafctnus.&c. who plamely take Edentor 
the proper name ofa Region, and fet the word (Eaftward J for ab initio: tor VamaJ- 
cens owne words are thefe, Paradifus eft locus Deimambm in Eden ad Onentem mmbt- 
liter cenf/tus- Paradife is a place, meruailoufly planted by the bands ofGodjn Edenjoward 
the Eaft. , 

And after all thefc Fathers, Guilhelmus Parifenfis, a great learned man,and Sixtus 
*«»«*/&, of latter times, doe both vnderftand thefe words of Eden , and of the Eaft, 
contrarie to the vulgar tranflation; Parifienfn,a% indifferent to both,and Sixtus Senen- 
>,dire<% againft thevulgar : of which thefe are thcirowne words. After this Iwill 
beginneto/feakeofParadifeterreftrialli whichthtt God planted from the beginning, or 
Eaftward, &c. Poflhac imipiam loqui de Paradifo terreftri, quem plant off e Deum ab initio 
velad Orientem,&c. And then Senenfts (Moses enim clariftimeprodit, Paradifum k 
Deo con [hum in regione terra Orient alts , qm dicitttr Hedcn : Heden autem ejje ptopriam 
yirfa (. nomen apparet ex quarto capitc Gen. vbi legimus Cham habit affe ad Orientalem plagam 2 o 

Heden 5 For M o s e s (i'aith he) dothfhew mo ft dearly, that Paradife was planted of God 
in a Region of the Eaft Countrie, which is called Heden : but that Heden is a proper name_j, 
itappearethbythefourthchapterofGenefis,wherewereade, that Cham dwelt on the^j 
Job88.44. Eaft border of Heden. Pek.ek.ivs endeuourcth to cjualifie this tranflation : for this 
particle (faith he) ab initio, is referred to all the time of the creation , and not to the 
very firft day ; alleaging this place of Chrift,that although the Dcuill was faid to be 
a man-flaier from the beginning, yet that was meant but after the fixthday. But 
furely, as I thinke (referring my fclfe to better judgement) the Deuill was from the 
inftant of his fall a man-flaier in difpofition,though he had not whereon to pra&ife 
til! mans creation. AndforconcIu(ion,J.fl'/>rflw^ (if that be his tranflation) adui- 30 
feth himfelfe better in the end ofthe third Chapter of Gene/is, conuerting the word 
(Eden) by (ante) and not fa principio) as, God did fet a Cherubin before the Garden of 
Eden, CoUocamt Deut ante Paradifum voluptatis Cherubin; and Pererim himfclfeac- 
knowledgeth, that this is the true fenfc of this place, precifcly taken , according to 
the Hebrew. Pofuit a parte Orientalihorti Heden, Cherubin ; Heefet on the Eaft fide of 
the Garden of Heden, Cherubin. B e c a n v s affirmeth that the Hebrew word (Re) fig- 
nifieth (with) afwell as (in) and Co the Text bearcth this fenfc ; That God planted 
a Garden with pleafure (that is to fay) full of pleafure. But Becanus followeth this 
conftru&ion, only to the end, to findc Paradiftevpon the riuer of Acefines : for there 
he hath heard ofthe Indian Fig-tree in great abundance, which he fuppofcth to bee 40 
thetree of knowledge, of good,and euill.and would therefore draw Paradifeto the 
Fig-tree : whichconceit of his I will anfwere hereafter. 

Now, becaufe Paradife was fcated by Mofes toward the Eaft, thence came the cu- 

ttorae of praying toward the Eaft.and not by imitation ofthe Cbaldaans: and therc- 

! fore all our Churches are built Eaft and Weft,as to the point where the funne rifcth 

^JinMarch.which is directly oucr/><»W//? (faith Bamafcenm:) affirming, tbatwcal- 

&" \vaies pray towardsthe Eaft, as looking tov/ards Paradife, whence wc were eaft out; 

and yet theTemple of Salomon had their Pricfts and Sacrifices,which turned thcra- 

felucs in their feruicc and diuinc ceremonies, al waies toward the Weft , thereby to 

auoid the fuperftition ofthe ^Egyptians and Chaldeans. jo 

But becaufe Eaft and Weft are but in refpedT: of places ; ( foralthough Paradife 
were Eaft from Iudt*, y et it was Weft from Per fa) and the feruing of God is eucry 
where in the world, the matter is not great which way wee turne our faces , Co our 
hearts ftand right, other than this, that wc who dwell Weft from P*r*dife,atv\ pray 

turning 



■rv^-t 



Cdfl, 



f afurt 



" le toth e 



Chap.^.S'-v of the HijlorieoftbelVorid. y-j 

turning ourleIuestowardsthehait:,mayrcrncmberthcreby to bi-fccch God, thai 
f by ^iwf fall we haue loft the Parad/fe on earth : fo byChnfts death and paffion we 
may be made partakers of the Paradife celcftiall, and the Kingdome of heaucn. To 
conclude, I concciuc, that there was no other myfterie in adding the word ( Eaft) to 
£^?« by /!/<//«, then to (hew, that the Region of Eden, in which Paradife was, lay 
Eaftward from Tttdea and Canaan : for the Scriptures alwaies called the people of 
thole Nations, the Sonnes ofthe Eaft, which inhabited Arabia,MeJopot.imia,Cbdd;<:i, 
and Perfia : of which Ouidi 

^o Eurns adAuroram, Nabatxacy regna receJSt, 

Perfida^ CT radijsiuga fubditamatutinis. 

The Eaft winde with Aurora hath abiding 
Among th' Arabian, and the Perfian hils, 
Whom Phoebus rirft fal utes at his vp-nfing. 

And if it be obiecfed, that Hhremie the Prophet threatning the deftruciion of 
Hierufalem, doth often make mention of Northern Nations, it is to be noted, that 
the North is there named, in refpect of thofe Nations that followed Nabnchodoxoforx, 
20 and of whom the greatcft part of his Armie was compounded ; not that Babylon 
it felfeftoodc North from Flierufdem, though inclining from the Eaft toward the 
North. 

Now to the difFerenceofthis Tranflation, Peter Comejlor giueth beft fatisfaction : 
forhevfeththeword, From the beginning, that is, from the firH part of the world, (a. 
principle) id est (faith he) a. prima, orbis parte, and afterward he affirmeth,that (aprin- 
cipio and adOrientem) haue the fimefignification ; From the beginning and Eaitwar4 
is all one, a principle idem eft quod Ad Or tent em. 

But to returne to the proofe ofthis place, and that this Storie of mankind was nor 
allegoricall, it followcth in the Text ofthe fecond Chapter and ninth Verie, in thefe 
30 wordes. For out oftheground made the Lord God iogroweuery tree pleafant tothe fight^ 
and good for meate, ejre. fb as lirft it appeared that God created Adam d/ewhere,as in 
the world at large , and then , put him into the garlen: and the encTwhy , is expreft : 
that be -might dreffe it and keepe it; Parad;fe being a Garden or Orchard filled with vtrfiit, 
Plants, and Trees, ofthe moft excellent kindes, plcafant to behold , and (withall) 
good for meate: whiclfprouefh that Paradife was a terreftriall garden, garnilhed 
with fruits, delighting both the eye and tafte. And to make it more plaine, andto 
take away all opinion of Allegoricall conftruction , he affirmeth that it was watered 
and beautified with a Riucr; expreffmgalfothc Region, out of which tbisRiuer y er f.ie': 
/prang, which he calleth Heden \ and that Heden is alio a Countrie necre vnto Cbaran E\ai>. 1.17.1;,: 
40 in(Jllefopotamia, EzccbielwitnciTeth. 

But to all thefe Cabatifts , which draw thetruth and Storie of the Scriptures into 
Allcgoncs,Epiphaaius anfwereth in thefe wordes : Si Paraiifa non eftfenfbilis, non 
eft etiam fans, f non est fans, non eft flumen,fi non eft fiemen , non junt quatuorprincipia, 
non Pifon, non Gehon, non Tigris ; nee Euphrates, non est fern, non folia , non corned/ 1 Eut 
de arbor e, non est Adint, non Junt homines, fed Veritas iam fabula eft, & omnia adAl/egO' 
ri.ti renocantiir, j/f Paradife be not fenfible, then there was no fount aine , and then no fi- 
ner, if no riucr, then nofuchfourc heads or branches, and then not any fuch riuer, as Pifon, 
or Gehon, Tigris, or Euphrates, nofucb figtrec,or fruit , or leaues,Eue then did not eate ofthe 
fruit, neither rvas there any Adam, or any man, the truth was but a fable , and all things c- 
j fteemedare called backe into ylllegories. Words to the fame effect hath S.Hierome vpon 
Daniel. Conticefcant eorum dehr amenta, quivmbras & imagines inveritate fequentes, 
ipft m conantur euertere veritatem, vt Paradiftim efflumina, S" arbor es patent Allegori.e 
legibtt-sfedebere fubruere , Let the dotages of them be f lent , xobo following foadoxes and 
images in the truth , endeauour tofubttcrt the truth itfelfe , and thinke that they ought 

E to 



WM<»« 



^a./r 



7f 



•& 



3* 



The fir ft "Booke of the fir ft part Chap. 



f^.cci.3 1 . p. 



Gs&.ij.io. 



log 
V7-9 



yo& X 



OiMMttmii 



to bring Paradife , and the ritiers and the trees vnder the rules of (^llleoorie. 

Furthermore, by the continuation and order of the Storie is the place made more 
manifeft. For God gaue Cddam free libcrtie to eat of cucry tree of the Garden,' (the 
trecofknowledge excepted) which trees Mofes in the ninth verfe faith that they 
were good to eat; meaning the fruit which they bare. Befides,God left all beaftes to 
Adam to be named, which he had formerly made ; and thefe beaftes were neither in ' 
the third heauen, nor neere the circle of the Moone , nor beaftes in imagination : for 
ifall thefe things were enigmaticall or myfticall , the fame.might alfo bee faid of the 
creation ofall things. And Ezechielbpeakmg of the glory of the Affymn Kings vfeth 
this fpcech. All the trees of Eden, which were in the garden of Cod, enuiedbim , which 
proueth both£«K and Paradife therein fcated to bee terreftriall : for the Prophets 
made no imaginarie comparifons. But Mefes wrote p!ainly,and in aiimple ftile,fit for 
the capacities of ignorant men , . and he was more large and preafein the dcfcriptioS 
■ of Paradife, then in any other place of Scripture 5 of purpofe to take away all fcruple 
from the incredulitie of future ages, whom he knew (out of the gift of Prophecie) to 
be apt to fabulous inuentions, and that ifhee had not defcribed both theregion and 
the riuers, and how it flood from Canaan, many of the vnbeleeuing Ifmelites , and ci- 
thers after them, would hauemifconftrued thisftorie of mankind. And is it likely, 
there would hauebeenefo often mention made of Paradife in the Scriptures, ifthe 
fame had been an Vteg* I For we finde that the valley,wherein Sodome and Gomor- 
rha flood, (fbmetimes called Pentapolis, ofthe fiue principall Cities therein) was be- 
fore the dcftrucl-ion (which their vnnaturall fipne purchaied) compared to the Para- 
dife ofthe Lord, and like to the land o? Egypt toward Zoar ; In like maner was ifracll 
refembled to the Paradife of 'God, before the Babylonians wafted it : which prooueth 
plainely; that Paradife it felfe exceeded in beautie and fertilitie, and that thefe places 
had but a refemblance thereof: being compared to a feat and foyle office exceeding 
cxcellencie. 

Befides, whence had Homer his inuention o^Alcinons gardens, as Tuflin Martyr no- 
teth, but out of Mofe s his defcription of Paradife ? Gene . i . and whence are their prai- 
fes ofthe Elifian ficldes , but out of the Storie of Paradife] to which alfb appertaine 
thofe verfes ofthe golden age in Quid. 

Vcr erat attrnum, placidi£ tepentibus auris 
Mulcebant Zephyr i natosfinefimineflores. 



10 



A 



a a 



A 



- 

" o 

1 0-| 






The ioyfull Spring did eucr Iaft, 

And Zephyrus did breede 

Without the hclpe of feede 
S weete flowers by his gentle blafl, 

And it is manifeft, thMOrphem, Linus^jndarut, Hefcdttsznd Homer, and after 
him, Quid, one out of another, and all thefe together with Pythagoras and Plato, and 
their feet atours, did greatly enrich their inuentions , by venting the ftollen treafures 
of diuine letters, altered by prophane additions, and difguifed by poeticall conuerfi- 
ons,as if they had beene concerned out of their owne fpeculations and contempla- 
tions. r 

But befides all thefe teftimonies , if we finde what Region Heden or Eden was ; if 

we proue the riuer that rannc out of it, and that the fame afterwards was diuided'in- 

tofoure branches ; together with the Kingdomcs olHmila and Cufh, and that all 

thefe are Eaftward from Canaan, or the defarts ofthe Amorites , where Mofes wrote, 

,irl then conceiue, that thereis no man that will doubt, but that fuch a place there was! 

1 And yet I doe not exclude the allcgoricall fenfeof the Scripture ; forafwellinthis 

I there were many figures of Chrift, as in all the old Teftament throughout : the Sto- 

§,,*ie being directly true notwithftanding. And to this purpofe (faith S*. K-AuguHine) 

Tret 



4? 



50 









1 . ,:►. 






% 



•*cl,| 



f 



C h a p.3.^.4.. of the Ht/lorie of the World. 

raA,f« m tntelhgt vo^t : aha eomm, qm^rmdttcr tantkm (tdeB) EcdcfiL ZlL 

utththisallowableiudgcment .Q^nsdmoduJhmno fi H fi[>ii t s , & tmMdTrZl 
fteaeeftprtditum, (thatis) ^/ w« W * w „/4r «,, ^ fcg fcnfAandlmS ■ 



19 



Siiictas in verbs 
PaitdifHS, 




$. mi: 

W^ ///ZmrUfc n ^Mtomtreatedd lg em!joftkfUceofParadife, 

Vritmaybcobietfed that iris needled, andakmdeofcuriofitieto ' 
, «iquirefod,hgentyafterthis place of ParaSfi, and that the know 
. ledgethereofHofhttJeornovre. To which Ianfwere, thattheret 
( nothing written m the Scriptures, but farourinftnicWon 7.1 t 1 

tl^rtcec^ 

tms p Ja ce of 6>« f /, (though otherwife for their docf nne in generaU thev ire worth v 

SSr ^ would beleeuethattherewLa peece of ti ctfJd 
mbZtnAr ITul^? fr ° m thence Aefoureriuers of Ganges, NiL 

wSeSn° U rhab «?"eworld, and in thofe places where they are nowfound 
Wh chleftany man thmke, that I enforce or If raine to the w6rft\ LfeareSS 

Jt«tr JU ta ntcbull U »t i m hocanobUcuho orh: which haue this fenfe : vmbtmL 

E 2 (faith 



- 3 ^ 



tfc 



sate 

p6S = 



.^rv; 









The firfi \Boo{e of the fir [I part Cha p .3.5.5- 



(faith he) Wegiue this for an anfwere,that Paradife is fit in a Region fine raifedaboue this 
fart which we inhabit c ; whereby tt comes to pafe , that from theme thefe riuersfalldowne 
withfucb a headlong violence , as wordes cannot cxpreffe ; and, vi>ith that force foimpulfid 
andpre'si, they are carried vnder the deepe Ocean , and dee againe arife and botle vp in this 
cur habitable world: and to this he addeth the opinion of Ephram, which isthis.Epbfam 
dicit Paradifum ambire tenant, at£ vltra Oceanum itapofitum ejp,vt tot urn ten arum an- 
ient ab omni circumdet regione, ntm aliter at% Luru orbis Lunam cingit, (which is) That 
Paradife doth compajfe or embrace the whole earth, and is fi fit beyond the Ocean Sea , as it 
enuironeih the whole Orbs of the earth eneueryfide, as the Orbe of the Mcone doth embrace 
the Moone. To the end therefore that thefe ridiculous expofitions and opinions doe i o 
not bring qucftion vnto truth it felfe,or make the fame fubieft to doubts ordifputcs, 
it is neceffarie to difcouer the true place of Paradife , which God and his wifedome ap- 
pointed in the very Natiell of this our world, and (as Mdanchton lilies) in parte terU 
meliore , in the he'stpart thereof, thatfrom thence , as from a Center; the Vniuerfall 
might be filled with people, and planted ; and by knowing this place , wee fhall the 
better iudge of the beginning of Nations, and of the worlds inhabitation : forneare 
vnto this did the Sonnes of Noah alfo difperfe thcmfclues after the floud , into all o- 
ther remote Regions and Countries. And if it be agenerous dellrc in men, to know 
from whence their owne forefathers haue come, and out of what Regions and Nati- 
ons, it cannot be difpleafing to vnderftand the place of our firft Aunccfter, from 10 
whence all the ftreames and branches of mankindehaue followed and beenc dedu- 
ced. If then it doc appenre by the former, that fuch a place there was as Paradife,md 
that the knowledge of this place cannot be vnprofitable , it followcth in order to ex- 
amine the feuerall opinions before remembrd,by the Truth it felfe; and to fee how ■ 
they agree with the fenfe of theScripture, and with common reafon, and afterward 
to proue directly , and td delineate the Region in which God firft planted this de- 
lightfull Garden. * 



Pf5 



■»' 






Cetie.i.io. 




• * 



$. V. 

That the pud bath not vtterly defaced the market of Paradife, nor caufedhils 
in the earth. 



30 




Nd firft, whereas it is [wp<pok<iby^fug.cbyfamen/is, that the floud 
t hath altered, deformed, orrather annihilated this place, infuchfort, 
1 as no man can finde any marke or memorie thereof: (of which opinion 
, there were others alfo, alcribing to the floud the caufe of thole high 
' mountaines , which are found on all the earth ouer , with many other 
ftrange effects) formy owneopimojT^Ithinke neither the one nor the other to be 
true. For although I cannot dcmeTburthat the face of Paradife was after the floud 40 
withered, and growne old, in refpedt of the firft beautie: (for both the ages of men, -. 

and the nature ofall things Time hath changed) yet if there hadbceneno figneof 
any fuch place, or if the foile'and feate had not remained, then would n oiMefes,v/ ha 
wrote of Paradife about 850. yeares after the floud,haue defcribed itfo particularly, 
and the Prophets long after Mofes would not haue made fo often mention thereof! 
And though the very garden it felfe were not then to be found, but that the floud, 
i and other accidents of time made it one common field and pafture with the land of 
Eden , yet the place is ftill the fame , and the riucrs ftill remainc the fame riucrs. By 
two of which (neucr doubted of ) to wit, Tigris, and Euphrates, we arc fure to finde 
in what longitude Paradife lay ; and learning out one of thefe riuers, which afterward 5 o 
doth diuide it felfe into foure branches, we are fure that the partition is at the very 
border of the garden it felfe. For it is written , that out of Eden went a riuer to wa- 
ter the garden, and from thence it was diuided and became into foure heads : Now 
whether the word in the Latine tranflation (Inde)from thence , be referred to Eden it 
i felfe, 



v.. 













\V/: ' 



C h a &.2.§-f' of the Hijlorie of the World. 



41 



felfe, or to Parad/fe, yet the diuiiion and branching of thole riuers muft be in the 
North or South fide of the very garden (if the riuers runne as they doe , North and 
South) and therefore thefe riuers yet remaining, and Eden manifestly knowne, there 
could be no fuch deficing by the floud, as is fuppofed. Furthermore , as there is no 
likelihood,that the place could be fb altered as future ages know it not,fb is there no 
probabilitie, that either thefe riuers were turned out of their courf es , or new riuers 
created by the floud which were not, or that the floud (as aforefaid) by a violent 
motion, when it beganne to decreafe, was the caufe of high hils, or decpe vallies. For 
what defcent of waters could there bee in a Sphajricall and round bodie , wherein 
io there is nor high nor low ? feeing that all violent force of waters is either by the 
ftrength of winde , by defcent from a higher to a lower , or by the ebbe or floudof 
the Sea. But that there was any winde (whereby the Seas are moft enraged) it ap- 
pearcth not, rather the contrarie is probable .-for it is written, Therefore Godmade a. CcnS.i, 
winde topajfe vpon the earth, and the waters ceafed. So as it appeareth not , that, vr.till 
the waters fanke , there was any winde at all , but that God afterward , out of his • • . t 
goodneflc, caufed the winde to blow, todrie vptheabundantflimeandmuddeof 
the earth, and make the land more firmc , and to cleanfe the aire of thicke vapoura 
and vnholefome mifts ^ and this we know by experience, that all dov/ne-right raines. 
doe euermoredifTeuer the violence of outragious winds, and beatc downe, and Icuell 
io the f welling and mountainous billow of the Sea -for any ebbes and flowes there 
could be none, when the waters were equall and of one heighth ouer all the face of 
the Earth, and when there were no Indraughts, Bayes , or Gulfes to rccciuc a floud, 
oranydefcent , orviolent falling of waters in theround formeof the carfhand wa- 
ters, as aforefaid : and therefore it feemcth moft agreeable to reafbn, that the waters 
rather ftood in a quiet calme , then that they moued with any raging or o.uerbearin" 
violence. And for a more direct proofe that the floud made no fiich deftroy ing al- 
teration , Iofefb. auo weth that one of thole pillars erected by Setb , the third from 
Adam, was to be feene in his dayes, which pillars were fet vp aboue 1425. yeares be- 
fore the floud, counting Setb to'bc an hundred iyearesold at the erection of them,and 
30 /^/'A-himfelfe,tohaueliuedfome4o.or50.yeares after CluMfbofvvhom although f"/^- 
there be no caufe to beleeuc all that he Wrote , Vet that , wEich heauouched of his 
ownetime, cannot (without great derogation) be called in queftion. And therefore 
it may be poffiblc, that fame foundation orruine thereof might then befeen JNow 
that fuch pillars were raifed by Setb, all Antiquitiehathauowed. It is alfb writ- 
ten in Bcrojus (to whom although I giue little credit, yet I cannot condemne him in 
al 1) that the Cittie of Enoch built by Cain, about the mountaines otLibanm, was not 
defaced by length of time : yea the mines thereof ^Annitts ( who commented vpon 
that inuented fragment) faith, were to be feene in his daies , who liued in thcraigne 
of Ferdinand and ifabella of Caflile ; andif thefe his wordes be not true, then was he 
40 exceeding impudent. For, /peaking of this Cittie of Enoch,hc concludeth in this'fbrt. 
Cuius maxima & ingentu molts fundaments, vifuntur, <& 'vacatur ah incolU regionis , Ci~ 
uitas Cain,vt noflri mer cat ores , & peregrini referunt, The foundation of which huge 
Majfe is novo to be feene, and the place u called by the people of that region,the Cittie of Cain, 
'as both our grangers md merchants report . It is alfb anow&clby Pomponiu-s Mela^ (to 
whom I giue more credit in thefe things) that the Cittie of lopp* was built before 
thefloud, ouer which Ccpha was King : whole name with his brother Phinens, toge- 
ther with the grounds and principles of their religion , was found grauen vpon cer-> 
taine Altars of ftone ; anditisnotvnpolTible, that the ruines of this other Cittie, 
called Enoch by Anums, might be feene,though founded in the firft age : but it could 
jo not be of thehrft Cittie of the world, built by Cain, the place, rather then the time, Gra. 4 . 17. 
denying it. 

And to proue directly, that the floud was not the caufe of mountaines , but that 
there were mountaines from the creation,it is written, that the waters ofthefloudouer- 
jb&ed by fftecne cubits the higbejl mountaines. And Mtjim Damafcenm /peaking of 

E 3 the 



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Cen.tS. 
3.24. 



the floud, wnteth in this manner. Etfupra Minyadam excel/us rnons in Armenia (qui 
Bark appellatur) in quo confugientes multos fermo eft diluuij tempore liberates, ^Andvp- 
ponCMmyada then is an high mount atne, in ^Armenia (called Bam) vnto which (as it is 
/aid) that many fleddem the time of the deluge , and that they fauedthemfelues thereon. 
Now although it is contrane to Gods word, that any more were faued then eight 
perfons ( which Mtfm doth not auow, but by report) yetitisateftimonie, that 
iuch mountames were before the floud, which were afterwards, and euer fince, 
knowne by the fame names ; and on which mountaines it is generally receiued that 
the^rfcrcfted : butvntruly, as I (hall proue hereafter. And againe it appeareth 
that the : Mount Syon (though by another name) was knowne before the floud • on id 
which the Thalmudifts report, that many Giants faued themfelues aifo ; but (as An- .' 
niuthuh) without all authoritie, either diuine or humane. 

Laftly, it appeareth that the floud did not Co turne vplide-downe the face of the 
earth as thereby it was made part knowledge , after the waters were decreafed , by 
this that when Noahfent out the Doue the fecond time, fhee returned with an Olme leafe in 
her mouth, which fhee had pluckt , and which (vntill the trees were difcouered) fhee 
found not : for otherwife fhee might haue found them floating on the water ; a ma- 
nif eft proofe , that the trees were not torne vp by the rootcs , nor fwamme vpon the 
waters, for it is written,/o//««w Oliua, rapt urn or decerptum, a leafe pluckt, (which is) to 
take from a tree, or to teare off. By this it is apparent, (there being nothing written id 
to the contrane) that the floud made no fuch alteration , as was fuppofed , but that 
the place of W^ might be feene to fucceeding ages, efpecially vnro Mofes, by 
whom it pleafed God to teach the truth of the worlds creation , and vnto the Pro- 
phets which fucceeded him : both which I take for my warrant , and to guide me in 
thisdifcouerie. D 



£. VI. 

1 hat Paradife was not the whole earth, as fame haue thought : making the Ocean to he 
the fountaine ofthofefoure Riuers. 



3» 



jgMgg His conceit oUug.chyfamenfis being anfwered, who only giueth^ 
M| opinion for reafon, I will in a few wordes examine that ofthe Manichies, ■ 
, oiNQUiomagw,Vadianus,Goropius, Because, and all thofe that vnder- ' 
j flood, that by Paradife was meant the whole earth. But in this I fhall 
> not trouble the Reader with many wordes, becaufe by thofe places 
of ienpture formerly remembred, this Vniuerfalitie will appeare altogether impro- 
per The places which fgJuuu allczgahjringforthfruit and multiplied the earth 
andJuhduettruteoucreuerycre*ture,&c. with this ofthe Afts, tad bah made of one • 
hloja [all mankmde, to dwell on all the face ofthe earth, doe no way proue fuch a generali- a* 
tie : for the world was made for man, ofwhich he was Lord and Goucrnour, and all 
things therein were ordained of God for his vfe : Now although all men were ofone 
andthefamefountameofblqud originally ; and Aims pofteritie inhabited in pro- 
ceffeoftimeouer all the face ofthe earth, yet it difproueth in nothing thcparticular 
garden amgned to Aim to drefTe and cultiue, in which he liued in fo bleffed an cftate 
before his tranfgreffion. For if therehad beeneno other choice, but that Adam had 
beeneletttotheVmuerfall; Mofes would not then haue faid EaflwardinEden,^ 
ingtheworldhathnorEaftnor Weft, butrefpcftiuely. And to what end had the 
Angeliof Godbeencfet to keepe the Eaft-fidc, and entrance intoParaiife after ^f. 

^ex P u 1 f.o,vftheVn.uerfillhadbeene^^?forthenmuft^Ihauebeen T o 
chafed alfoontof theworld. For if All the earth were Paradife, that place canre- 5 

ceiuenobetterconftrua.onthenthis,That^^wasdriuenoutoftheworldinto 
the world and out of Paradife into Paradife, except we fhould beleeue with Metrodo- 
rus, thatthereweremfiniteworlds. Which to denie; he thinkes all one, astoaf- 

firme, 



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Chap.;. 5.7. oftheHijlorie of the World. 

iWterunnc through isthmu VSS ^^ m W "' and 

^, W ithothcrs,aremadem nife J Y«Sfh e Sr^T ,G ' r<?W * and , ^ 

yond theOceanSea.andthat^,* waded thrmehhTdTlT ^^A? 
Countrie,in which heewas created and w«hiiriT ,. , camctoward the 

nued many yearcs after the floud vm- sJ la™ \! S katur ^. andfoconri- 

. * r ^ d ° mC ^ a 

is fo ridiculous, as it needs no argument to difproueit ' pm,0n 



lftWi 




$• VII. 

|Hirdly, whereas Bed* faith and i« f l,„c u 1 

J^wasfarreintheEaft,b42^^^^^ 

30 5^^Sharth, 3 „dneartheOrbeofSoon f T^^^^dall the 

^"enchargc*^^ 

. andh!,M^W; and wherea LLS "r ' ^"^Pon^U". 

hat all thefe borrowed this doflrin ou« 5 S/ndT* eaB ? |It,,,a ^ &n > e . 
therofrhem (asTc^«nc)wanSaS^ 1 , P p;°™°f Sunless butnei- 
forheauenitfclR, lntowl 2h t h;^ 

and many other d iuine apprehSns ) fo dote h t t f7*™. * «• *W * 
terme S ,efpecially PWtbSugh* Sin faJSfift ^K 6 ™" 1 in P ,aine ** 
,40 mg one only powertull God- and trZZfZ lTut dpith > {otzckm ^z- 
\ right as b/aS Oracle, » ^«^ fetllS fi^" ^ d ° C hta *» *>< 

that ftW, had read the Scriptures and * f 1 ^ /"^ me Mm F affinncth £> 
IiisoDiniorrrhw^,.^^ 



lt«. 



^^dr? a d7^ 

m«h tome, that horTP>-J?JiBi--t a i H *™'B ftl: »»«»Jnteda Chnfhan. And itfee- -** 



judgement 



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44- 



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-^judgement. Sicutcertumejt Enoch cr Eliam nuncviuere : itaubi nunc fmt,a» 
'inParadiJoanahbi,incertumejl: (that is) As it is cert Mne that Enoch Mu El ias 
doe now Hue :fo where they now line, m Paradife or elfewhere, it is vncertuwe. B ut Barce- 
phas pucsa third caufe,thoughof all other the weaken. For (faith he) it was necef- 
farie that Paradife mould be let at fuch a diiiance and heighth,becaufc the fourc Ri- 
ucrs (had they not fallen lb precipitate) could nothaue had fufficient force to haue 
thruft thcmfelues vnder thegreat Ocean , and afterwards haue forced their paffage 
through the earth, and haue rif en againe in the farre diitant Regions of India., Jk- 
gypt, and Armenia. 

Thcfe ftrange fancies and dream es haue beeneanfwered by diucrs learned men fa 
long fincc,nnd lately by Hopkins'md Percrim writing vpon this fubjeft; of whole ar- 
guments I will repeat fheie few : for to vie long dilcourfe againft thole things, 
which are both againft Scripture and Realon, might rightly be judged a vnnitie in - 
the Anfwerer, not much inferiour to that of the Inuentour. 

It is firft therefore alleaged, that fuch a place cannot be commodious to liue in : 
for being let fo ncarc the Moone, it had beene too nearc the Sunne , and other he a- 
uenly bodies. Secondly, bccaule it muft haue beene too joyncl a Neighbour to the 
Element offire.Thirdly,becaufctheaire in that Region is lb violently moued, and 
carried about with fuch fwiftncfTe, as nothing in that place can confift or haue aby- 
ding. Fourthly, bccaule the place betwecne the Earth and the Moone (according 20 
to PtolomieandAlfiagmus) isfeuentccnetimesthe Diameter of the Earth, which 
makes by a grolTc account about one hundred and twentie thoufand milcs.Hereup- 
on it muft folio w,thatP^4^//e,bcingraifed to thisheighth,muft haue the compaflc 
of the whole earth for a Bafts & foundation.But had it been lb raifed,it could hardly 
be hidden from the knowledge, or eics of men : feeing, it would depriuevs of the 
Sunnes light,all the fore-part of the day, being feared in the Eaft , as they fuppole. 
Now,to fbrtitie the former opmions,Toftatu>s addeth this,that thofe people which 
dwell neare thofe fals of watcrs,arc deafe from their infancie,!ikc thofe which dwell 
ckensmn. ncarc t ' ie Catadup&pr ouer-falls oi^ilus. But this I hold as fained. For I haue fecne 
s<ip. inthe W/«,farre greater water- fills, than thofe of Nilus, and yet the people dwel- 50 

lingnearethem.arenotdeafcatall. Toftatus (the better to ftrengthenhimfelfe)ci- 
tethff.i/?/and Ambrofe together: to which Per.er.ivs, Sedegoktcapud Bafilium 
& A mbro fium in eorumfcriptis^qux nunc extant,nufquam me legere memmi 5 But 1 doe 
not remember (faith he) that I euer read thofe things,either in Bafil or Ambrofe. 

But for the bodies of Enoch and Eluis,Go6 hath difpofed of them according to his 
wifdorne. Their taking vp might be into the celeftiall Paradife Jot ought we know. 
Foralthough flcihand bloud, lubje£t to corruption, cannot inherit the Kitigdomc 
of Heauen,and the fiede muft rot in the ground before it grow, yet we [hall not all 
i.eor. i?.3<5.j j die (faith S l . Pavl) but all fall be changed : which change, in Enoch and Elias,\vas ea- 
iiPeCj7io.**"'fte'to him that is Almightie.But for the reft,rhe Scriptures are manifeft that by the 40 
floud allperimed on the earth, fauing eight pcrfons,and then-fore in thcterreftriall 
Paradife they could nor be. 

YorToflatus his own?opinion,whofoarcd not altogether fb High as the rcft,but 
belicucd that Paradife was raifed abouc the middle Region of the aire, and twentie 
cubits nbouc all mountaines,thatthe floud did not therefore reach it: (which Scotus 
and other later Schoole- men alfobelieued; for, faythcy, there were no finncrs in 
Paradife, md therefore no caufetoouerwhelmc it :) tbisisalfocontrarictothecx- 
prefle letter of the Scripture : which dircc"Hy,& without ad mitting ofany diftincli- 
Gra7.i9. on teachcth vs,that tbewaters ouerfowed all the mountaincsvndcr beauen. And were it 

othcrwife,then might wcafwell giue credit to OWafms Damafcen us, and ihtThalmu- 50 
^//?^,whoaffirme,that there were ofthe Giants that fiued thcmfelues on the moun- • 
taine Baris,and on ,vyon. But to helpc this, Scotus, being (as the reft ofthe Schoole- 
men are) full ofdiftincTions.faith; that the waters ftood at Paradife, as they did in 
ixti.1 4.*i. the Red Sca,and at lor dun ; and as the floud was not naturaJl,fo was Paradife faued 

by 



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C h a p.2.§'.8. o/>^ Hijlorie of the JVorid. 



by miracle. And 7'fo>«.« .^WMf qualificth this high conceit with this fuppofi tion ■, 
That it was not bclccued, that Paradife was fo feated as B^ and others feeme to at- 
firme in wordes, but by Hyperbole and comparatiuely,for the delicacieand bcautic fo 
refcmblcd. But this Idarcauowof all thofe Schoolc-mcn, that though they were 
exceeding wittie, yet they better teach all their followers to fhift, then to refolue, 
by their diftinclions. "VVherefbrcnottoftay long in anfwering this opinion oiToJii- 
ttit I confcfTe that it is written, that the Mountaines of Olympus, Atho, and Atlas, o- 
uer'-rcachandfurmountallwindesandcloudcs, and that (notwithflanding) there is 
found on the heads ofthehilles both fprings and fruits ; and the Pagan Pnefts, facri? 
i o ficing on thefe mountaine tops,doe-not finde the alb.es (remaining of their facriuccs) 
blowne thence, nor thence wafht off by raines, when they returne : yet experience 
hath refolued vs, that fbcle reports are fabulous , and PlmU himfeife (.who was not 
fparino in the report ofwonders) auowcth the contrane. Butwereitgraunted, yet 
thTheighth of thefe mountaines is farrc vnder the fuppofed place oi Paradife ; and on 
thefe felfehilles tbcaireis fo thinne (faith S c . Auguftine whom herein I miftraft) 
that it is not fumcient to beare vp the body ofa bird, hauing therein no feeling of her 
wings, or any fc-nnble refinance of aire to mount her felfe by. 



20 




45 



I >i 



..■«■• Y.f ' . 

Of their opinionthatfeatePatadifcvnd£r the tA^.quinocliall-.'itndof the pkafant 

habitation vnder thofe Climates. 

^^■m>>r $& Hofe which come ncare vnto reafbn finde Paradife vnder the t/£quino- 

i ciUllline, as Tertulli*n> Bonauenture, and Vurandus ■, iudging,that there- 

vnder might be found moftpleafure, and the gf eateft fertilitie offbile: 

but againftit Thomas Aquinas obiefteth the diftefnperatchcate,which 

he fuppofeth to be in all places foturec'tly vnder the Sunne ; but this is 

3 o (mm c tufa pro caufa) for although Paradife could hot be vnder the line, becaufe Eden is 
farrefrom it, in which Paradife was ; and becaufe there is no part o£Euphrates,Tigrit, 
orG««j«vhderit,('6*»jttbeingoneof thefoureriucrs, as they fuppofe) yet this 
conceit of diftcmper, (being but an old opinion) is found to be very vntrue , though 
fortheconicchirenotto be condemned , confidering the age when thofe Fathers 
wrote, grounded chiefly on this : that whereas it appeared, that euery Countries as it 
lay by degrees nearer the Tropick, and fo toward the ^Equinociiall, did fo much the 
morecxccedcinheate, It wastherefbreareafonablcconie&ure, that thofe Coun- 
tries which were fituated directly vnder it, were ofa diftempcr vninhabitable : but it 
feemeth that Temllian .concerned better, and fo did Auicenne, for they both thought 

4° them habitable enough ; and though (perchance) in thofedayes it might be thought 
a fantafticall opinion (as all arc which goe againft the vulgar) yet we now finde , that 
if there be any place vpon the earth of that nature, bcautie, and delight, that Paradife 
had, the famemuftbc found within that fuppofed vninhabitable burnt Zone, or 
within the Tropicks, and neareft to the line it felfe. For hereof experience hath in- 
- formed reafon, and Time hath made thofe things apparent, which were hiddcn,and 
couldnot by any contemplation bedifcoucred. Indcede it hath fo pleated God Co 
prouide for all liuing creatures, wherewith he hath filled the world, that fuch incon- 
uenicnecs which we contemplate a farre off, are found by rri'all and the witneffe of 
mens trauailes, to be fo qualified, as there is no portion of the earth made in vaine, or. }) ■ 

50 asafruitleffclumpctofafhionoutthercft. Vor God himfeife (L\ithlsM)thatJormed i/j 74 ;.;8 4 
the earth and made it, be fat preparrd/t , htcreatcditnotinvainc, he formed it to be in- 
habited. Now we finde that thefe hotteft regions ofthe world, feated vnder the &§- 
quinocii all line , or neare it , are fo refrefhed with a daylie gale- of Eaftcrnely winde 
^which the Spaniards call the Brize, that doth euermorc blow ftrongeftin the heate 





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n«htsa«tocoId,SK«SSf f . foundthercb 7- fondly the 

ButCfor.thegreateftpartVSS I r a ° '" *" ° ther P-^ of the world 
ny Ktfrs of delicate fruites effiSS ™dotberftately trees calling (bade.fo hia- 

««<*«*«»; fornature being libenfll ,11 ? W Ca " ed r ™ ™»^ «8* 

andhcentiouspleaftre? Sothat?oconcud^h- r ^"^vaine though, 
pmionwere notdeceiucdin S n SfS„^^' r ^^ andAofc ^o- 

gr^jHthi^particul^ ^^J^^^mMj^Jdio^xncn weK - 

■ ■ _ 

f IX 

'"feech. 27. 

thcminanyofthcii-ftories AXthSf 57*" dcf P lftd °"ce to*mncmber , a 
fedidth^tnmsfbrmeXmmLoftK Monarchies fucceeded each other" 4 
and a fterthem,ther«S^ 
theancientrnernoneofthSSte 

w ^hleadethtothcCountS^ 

^rnoitbeaurifullan^ 

^Ej^ardwas^fe/w b uSthSS n, ?^ ncxtQ)unt «y'<> 

wrote:andthenextvnto it EaftwVdn ?o w- ^ 

ipeftofthemfonlkiecou dS^n^^^^^whicfiinnvyo 

ieeke 



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4-7 



fccke it in other 5criptures,and where it is by theudditions of the neighbour Nations 
better deferibed. In the Prophet tfki I findeit coupled and accompanied with other m 
adiacent Countries, in thcitnvordesfpoken in the perfon of Senacberibby R*b[ak>h ' ' 

Bane the Cods of the lotions deli tiered them, which my Fathers haue deftroyed v G o s an ' 
and Hau n, WResjp h, m dthe children of El d e n, which were at Tela far • and in 
£^«to/,whcre he prophec.eth againft the Tynans :Thej ofH *uk and C a n n e h cap „ ver fy, 
and ho en, the Merchants of S la h ii a , A s h v a , «W C H iijiad, were tb yAier. 
chants , &c. 

But to auoideconfufion, we muftvnderftand that there were two Edens , one of 
I o wmch the Prophet ^mos remembreth , where he diuideth Syria into three Prouin- c^.verf.u 
ces, whereof, the hrft he makcth #«, Damafcene , or DeupotitM : the fecond part is 
that V alky called <_^»«« 5 otherwifeCte%*/&, or the Trail of chamath where A/Ty. 
r ia is myned to Arabia the Defart, and where PU/emtiflaceth the Citne of Auert't- 
and the : rhirdisknownc bythzmmvoflig^EdeHU^CeUfjrU, otherwikr^/. smM 
ua, ox the hollow Galley, bccaufetncMountaincs o£LiiMMandA*tiMm«< t take-ill 
thelength of it on both fides, and borderit : forC^inGreekeisto* inLatine 
But this ls not that £*», which we feekc: neither doth thisProumce lie Eaft from 
Gmm* but North, and fo loyneth vnto it , as it could not be vnknowne to the He- 
brew*' Yet, becaafe thereis a little Cittie-jWin called ttrtMfi. the Jmetbdoe- 
30 uvdthisCcrcfyriatobethc&mcwhkhMofesdcfcxibcth. For the fame caufe doth 
Hopkins mhis 1 reanfc of W/' reprehend a™*** in that he confoundeth this 

h3^eleddethewayto/^ w ,andtoalIotherlatterwTiters,fauing thathefii- 

ledindiftmsurfhmgthe^wo Regions, both called**. : and ' that hee altogether 

■ ™ ,fv, f ^twootthcfoorcRiuers (towit) rijm and Gehon, as fhall appearc 

hereafter. Nowtofindeouti^, which (as Mofes 'teachcth vs) layEaftwardK 

theDefarts, wherehee wrote after hee had paflcd thereddeSea wee muft confide" 

with it. for (faith E s A i a h) ff^ M , h™, , WiWi*<& , and the children of Eden 
3 %ttT^lT; ^^f^^^nJ^Eden, who to «l£S **,,.„, 
thoicot^ A[h»r .andcfoAwrf.werethcMerchantsthattradedwiththeCittie * 

A„?M' I hlch r the » Cfiith Ezhchih.) theCVart *f the people forZtZ 

ttdZtttol "? VP °" 5*>*? to » and r «* • a " dfrom tl^cncetranfpor 

Sf ■ u i * 7)J*, afterward to Tripdie, -mdnow to Aleppo, from whence 

comZSi? / th ^ ththe P e °P^r h whom toey4d commerce, aridalfowhat 

7! wr^ W ' corra *»fy*rk: and afterwards fpeaking of the Mer- 
chants o tffcfa : and * W, and what kindes they traded, he hath thefe wordes. The 
VlZTTnt , R f mah " mth J Chants Jhey occupied in thy Earns, with the 

Mei^ltllSptces andwithallprctioixftoncsandgold. Now thefe be indeed the riches 
vmcaPerluMdArabiaFwlixycdd : and bccaufetfkfaand flMwaarethofeoartsof 
^^wh.chborderthe Sea, calledthe />^W„//,, thereforedidtholeNations 

and (wrtnall) hauing trade with their neighbours of W«, had from them alfo all 
fortsoffpices.andpentieofgold. Thcbettertoconueythefecommoditiestotha 
great Mart of 7)r, jheshehansorArahiansentxedbythemonthofTi.ris and from 
thedttie of Tared,;, (built or enlarged by ?{j.bmhoionom , now called *li»j 

thence 



tct. 



t*> 



f h i- 



U "p^y-jZy 



48 



Tk e fir ft "Booke of the fir ft part- C h a p . 3 . $ , 






Pirn. 1.6. c.16. 



Slr.ibo.l.id. 



G«MI.Jt. 



thence fent vp all thefe rich mcrchandi fes by boate to Babylon , from whence by the 
body of Euphrates, as farre as it bended Weftward,and afterward by a branch there- 
of,, which rcacheth within three daics journey of Aleppo, and then ouerland they 
pair to Tyre , as they did afterward to Tripalie ( formerly Htcropolis ) and thence to 
^flcxandretta, as aforefaid. Now the Merchant? of Canneh, which Ezechid'ioyntxb. 
with Eden, inhabited farrc vp thcriuer,and receiucd this trade from Arabia and India, 
beiides thofe proper commodities which them/el ues had , and which they receiued 
out of Perjia, which bordered them. S c . Hierome vnderftandeth by Canneh li-Strleucia, 
which is feated vpon Euphrates , where it breakctb into fotire heads , and which tooke 
that name from Se/euctts, who made thereof a' magnificent Cittie, tiierofoiymitanus iq 
thinkes it to be Ctefiphon, but Ctefiphon is feated downe low -vpon Tigris , and Canneh 
cannot be on that fide, I meane on the Eaft-fide of 'Tigris , for then were it out of the 
Valley oishimr. Plmie placeth the Scbenitevpon Euphrates, where the lame begin- 
neth to be fourdablc, which is toward the border of Syria , after it leaueth to be the - 
bound of Arabia the Defart, and where the riuer of Euphrates rcfiecteth from the De- 
Jart of Palmirena -. for thefe people oi Canneh ( afterward Scheniu ) inhabited both 
borders of 'Euphrates, ftretching themfelues from their owne Gittie of Canneh in Shi- 
mr Wcftward along the banks of 'Euphrates, as firreas the Cittie oiThapfacm, where 
Ttolomie appointed the Foords of Euphrates t which alfb agreeth.with the defiription 
of the ScheniU by S/rA, whole wordes arc thefe; iMcrcatoribut ex Syria Seleuciam 2 q 
& Babylonian* cunt thus iter e/lper Schenitai, The Merchants which trauailefiom Syria to 
Seleucia andBa by Ian, take their way by the Scbenites. Therefore thofe which take Can- 
neh for charran doe much miftake it. For Charran, to which Abraham came from rr 
in Chaldea (called by God) ftandeth alfb in Mesopotamia , not vpon Euphrates it felfe, 
butvponthermerofc&j&ww, which falleth into Euphrates: and the Merchants of 
Charran are diftinftly named with thofe of Canneh in Ezechiel (as) they ofHaran , and 
Canneh, andEden, the Merchants ofsbeba,A[kur,andcbilmadweretbyiJHerchants. 
Wherefore charran which is fomctime called chanc, and Haran,md Aran,is but the 
hmiecharran of 'UHefopotamia; and when it is written Aran, then it is taken, for the 
region of Mefopotamia: or Aran fimiorum, t he Greeke \NOrd_ rLMefnpotamU) impnr. *| 
tmg,aCountriebetweeneRiucrs.-for^winGreeke,isAr^/WinLatine, and?*- " 
tamos, fltmius : and when it is written liar an or Aran , it is then taken for the Cittie it 
felfe, to which ^Abraham came from Vr (as aforefaid.) For Strabo in the defcription 
of Arabia, giucth that Tract of land from the borders of 'Calefyria , to the edge of ' 
Mefopotamia,to the Schenit.e,\vho alfo inhabited on both fides of Euphrates,md were 
in after-ages accounted of thefe ^Arabians which inhabiteR^*™, and the North 
part ofthe Defarts, ftretching themfelues toward the vnhabited Solitude ot Palmire- 
na, which ly eth bet wcene Syria , and Arabia the Defart. So as thefe of Canneh lay in 
the very high-way from Babylon to Tyre, and were neighbours (indifferent) to Char- 
ran and to Eden : and therefore they arc by the Prophet Ezechiel coupled together, 40 
they ofHaran, andCanneh, andEden, fjre. But S^.Hierome made a good interpretation " 
of Canneh, orchalne, by Seleucia: for taW* was anciently called Chalanne (witneffe 
Appian 5 J and fo Rabanm CMaurm callethit in his Commentaries vpon Gcnefis • the 
name by time and mixture of languages being changed from chalee ore anneh, to 
Chalanne : of which name there are two other Cittics , ff anding in Triangle with Se- 
leucia, and almoft the next vnto it, (as) Thelbe ■ canne, md Mann-canne ; the°one a little 
to the Weft of Seleucia , and the other oppofitc vnto it , where thefe riuers of Tigris 
and Euphrates arc ready to ioyfie. T herefore, which ofthefe the ancient Canne was, 
(being all three within the bound ofthe Valley shinar) it is vncertaine : but it is a 
noteafvveil ofthe importance of the place, as of the certainefeate thereof, that fo to 
many other Cittics did retaine a part ofthe name in To many ages after. Neither is ic 
vulikely, that thefe additions of Thelbe and Mann to the word Canne, were but to 
makediiTcrencebetwecnetheEaftandtheWcft^rthegreaterandtheleffeC^,, 
or bctwccnecanne the old, and the new : which additions to diftmguifh Citties by, 
•ire ordmanein all the Regions of the world, * Now 






! !e *eto 



.<*r,- 



Jj jwA.'^ S - 



C h a P.3.^.9. of the Hijlorie of the World. 



4-9 




Now of the other Cittie ioyned with Eden, as HaranorCharran, S^.liierome on 
the /*^« fpcaketh thereof in thefe words: Cumt^ reuertereniur , peruenmmt ad J„d. i, 
Charran, que elt in medio itinere contra. Nin'tuen, vndecimo die, when they retnr- " 
ned , they cam: to Chirr an , (which is the mid-way again si Ninihe ) the tlaienth 
day . 

This Cittie is by the Martyr Stephen named ch.trrdn (/peaking to the high Prieft • 
Teemen, brethren, and fathers hearken -.TheGodofglorie appearedio our father Abu. a- a7. 7 . j ' 
ham, wbilehewasinMefofotamia, before he dwelt in Charran. But the /eate of this 
Cittie is not doubted of : for it is not only remembred in many Scriptures, but, wirh- 
i0 all, exceeding famous for the death and oucrthrow ofcrsjfus the Roman, who for 
hisvnfatiablegrecdincfle was called Gurges tukritik, thegulfe efdtixrlct. Whereof 
Lacan : 



Cam 



tJfffyriai Latie maculatiit f anguine Carras, 
With Roman bloud th'Afiyrian Carre he defiTcf, 



iMctnJ.i, iof„ 



But this Cittie Canne or chalne is made manifeft by okofes himfelfe , where it is 
written of Ni mho d. oiW the beginning of his Kmgdomewa-s Babel, and Erech, and Gm.io. 10. 
2 o <^fcad, and Chalne, in the LndefSinaar, or Shinar : where Mofes iheweth the firft com- 
pofition of the Babylonian Empire, and what Citties and people were fubieft vnto 
Nimrod, all which lay in the /aid Valley of Shinar or near'eit; and this Valley of 
£<Wis that Tract, afterwards called Babylinia and Chold**; into which alfo Ed.-» 
lixetchcth it felfe. Chaldea, Babylonia, Sinaar, idemfunt (frith Comestm) Three 
names ofoneCounirie : which Region of Babylonia tookename of the Tower Babel- 
andtheTower,oftheconfunonoftongues. And that Shinar was Babylonia, ids' 
proucd in the eleuenth Chapter oiGenefis, in thefe wordes : And as they went from the Verf. zj 
East, they found a Blaine in the land of Shihar, and there they abode : in which Flamed 
bylon was built (as aforefaid.) 
qo NowShwar being Babylonia, and Canneh, in the firft beginning oFTTJmreJs erear- 
nefle, and before he had fubducd any ftfange, or farrc-off nations , being one part of 
his Dominion, and alfo named by Mofes to be in Shinar, m proueth, thatcW, loy- 
neth to Babylonia ; which alfo Ezechielcoufltih with Eden, and (further) affirmcth 
X hat thofe of Eden were alfo the Merchants, which traded with the Tynans ■ and Efai 
in the threats pfStwhard againft Hierufalem ( with other Nations that Senacharib 
rauntedthathrsFathcrshaddcftfoyed)nameththcchildrenof£ a tewhichwercat 
Telaffar But before I conclude where Eden it felfe lyeth, it is neceilarie to defcribe 
tr,oie other Countries, which Ezechtel loynzth therewith in the places before re- 
membred, as, thoft of: Sheba and Raamah. It is written In Uehenl the tenth: Mormei y. r r. r 
40 the fonnes of W a m were C U % &c. And the fonnes ofCv s n were Seba, and Hauilah, 
*ndSabtab,andRaamah,&c. And the fonnes nf Raamah were sheba,ejrc. and anon • 
after C vs u begat N 1 m * d d : fo as Sheba was the grand-child ofofoand Nimrod the 
lonne of Cujh , whofe elder brother was Scbah : though fome there are that conceiue 
to the contrane, that Nimrod Was the elder in valour and vndcrftanding,though not 
in time and precedence of birth • who inhabited that part of Shiharfrheie Babel was 
built, afterwards Babylonia. His brother Raamah or Regma tookc that part adiovnin* 
toshwar, toward the Sea-fide and VnfianGtdfe (called afterward Raamamd Shebt 
by the Father and his Sonnes, which poffefTed it.) For (faith E z e c h r e £) the Mer- 
chants of Raamah and Sheba were thy Merchants, they occupied in thy E aires with the chief 
jo of all f}tccs,andall pretious ftoncs , andgold. So as SW.-! was that Traftof Countrie, 
which parteth Arabia deferta from Arabia Easlix,i\vA which ioyncth to the Sea where 
Tigris nnd Euphrates fall out, and render thcmfelues to the Ocean. This part , and 
the confining Countrie Strabo calleth Cattbaria, where the belt Myrrhe and Fra'nkin- si tail, us, 
cen/c is gathered; which people haue an interchange or trade with Ehna, Ivin^ on 

F rhc 



s *.-.-. 




r°{f^ 



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50 



1 'he fir ft i Boo{e of the fir [I part Cha P.3.^.9. 



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20 12. 

£fa.:9.i. 



the Eaft fide of the /"«/«» G«^. By this it appeareth who were the Shebans, ipo- 
ken of 'by Etecblel, and laid to hau.e beene the Merchants of Tyre, for gold,fpices,and 
prptious ftoncs : of which they had not only plentie oftheir owne, but were a!fo fiir- 
nilhed from that part of India (called Elans, according to Strabojfor exchange oftheir 
Aromatiques and other proper commodities. For as Slrabo reporteth out of E- 
R A t o s t n e n e s . In Per Jim org initio Infttla efl , in qua mUlti ejr pretioJtvnior.es gi- 
gmntur : inalijs verb, clan &pcrlucidi lapilli. Eratosthenes ( faith S t r. a b o) 
affirmeth, that in the beginning of the Perjian Gulfe there is an Ifland, in which there are 
manypretiouspearlcs bred : and in other, very cleare and finning {tones. Now the diffe- 
rence betwecpe Sheba , the fonne of Raamah , and Seba , thefonneof Cujh, isinthis, to 
That Seba is written with the Hebrew (SamechJ and Sheba with ( Schin :) but what- 
foeuer the difference may be in the Hebrew Orthographic, their Countries and ha- 
bitations arc diuers. For Sheba is that part which bordcreth the Per fan Sea ; and Sa- 
ba (whence the Qucene of Saba) neighboured the redde Sea; and fb that place of 
the 72. Pfalme, expounded. Reges ^drabum & Saba, hath in the Hebrew this 
fenfc : Reges Shekc & Sabz. 

The Shebans Ezechiel namcth together with the Edenites, becaufe they inhabited 
vpon the Out-let of the fame riuer,vpon which the Edenites werefcated : and fo thofe 
of sheba, towards the Sea-coaft and vpon it, paftvp the Countrie, by Tigris and £«- 
phrates,bcm2, ioyncd in one maine ftreame,and fo through the Region 'of Eden which ao 
Tigris boundeth , thereby the better to conuey their merchandife toward Tyre. 
And as the Citties of churran, and Canneb,border Eden on the Weft andNorthweft: 
fo doth Sheba on the South, and Chilmad on the North-eaft. C/WWbeing a Region 
of the higher Media, as appeareth in the ckaldxan ParaphraH, which Countrie by the 
Geographers is called Coromitena, (L) placed by exchange for (R-.) which change 
the fiebrewes alfo often vfe. 

Thus much of thofe Countries which border Eden, and who altogether traded 
with the Tyrians: of which, the chiefe were the Edenites, inhabiting Telajfar : for 
thefe Senacharib vaunted, that his Fathers had deftroyed ; and this place of Te'latfar 
lay moftconuenient, both to receiue the Trade from Sheba and Arabia, and alfo to 30 
conuey it oucr into Syria, and to Tyrus. Now to make thefe things themore plainc, 
we mult remember, that before the death of Senacharib, many parts of the Babyloni- 
an Empire fell from his obedience, and after his death thefe Monarchies were vtterly 
difioyncd. } 

For it appeareth both in Ejai the 3 7, and in the fecond of Kings , by the threats 
of Rabfuhe, the while the Armie of Affyria lay before Hierufalem, that the Citties 
of Gof«n,H«ran,Refepb,md the Edenites at Telafar,had refifted the AJfyr tans, though 
by them (in a fort) maiftered and rccouered. Haue the Gods of the Nations df littered 
them, whom my Fathers hatte deftroyed, as Gofan, andHaran , Rcfeph , and the children of 
Ed°>?, which were at Telajfar. But it appeared manifeftly after Senacharibs death, that 40 
thefe Nations formerly contending, were then freed from the others fubieftion : for 
Efir-HaddonhAd Affyria, and Merodicb Baladan , Babylonia. And after that the Ar- 
mie of Senacharib, commanded byRabfache, which lay before Hierufalem (Ezechias 
then raigning) while Senacharib was in is£gypt, was by the Angell of God deftroyed: 
the King of Babel lent to Ezechias , both to congratulate the recouerie of his healthj 
and fm vidtoric obtained ouer the AJfyrians. After which ouerthrow Senacharib 
himfelfe was fiaine by his owne fonnes in the Temple of his Idols , Efar- Haddon fuc- 
ceedinghim in Affyria. To the Babylonian Embaff adorns fentby Merodach, Ezechias 
ihewed all his treafurcs, afwell proper as confecrate, which inuited the Kin°s of Ba- 
bylon afterward to vndertakc their conqueft and fubuerfion. So as , the fiifpition of < o 
warrecncreafingbctweenc^/OTand^rrw, the Edenites which inhabited the 
borders of Shmar towards the North, and towards Affyria , were imploy ed to beare 
oft the incurfions of the ^fffyrians 5 and their Garrifon-place was at Tela far • and the 
very word (Telajfar) faith iunius, fignifying as much , as a Bulwarke againft the Affy- 

rian$. 









pi in, 



I 




M 



C h a p. 3.^.10. of the Hijlorie of the World. 



5i 



runs. T his place Hierofolymitanm takes for Re/em, others for Scleuc/a: but this Te- 
laffaris the fame, which y^m.Marcel/im^mtheHilloncof/ulian (whom he follow 
ed in the cnterpnfe of Perfia) calleth Tbilutha in ftead d£Telaffar,who defcribcth the 
exceeding ftrength thereof in his 2 4. Booke : It is feated in an Ijkndoi Euphrates vp- 
pon a fteepe and vnaffaul table Rocke , in fb much as the Emperour ialian durft not 
attemptit ; and therefore it was a conuenicnt place for a Garriibn againft the Affyri- 
ans, being alfb a paflage out of Mefopotamia into Babylonia, and in which the Edemas 
of the Countrie adioyning were lodged to defend the lame.. This place Ptoloniie cal- 
leth Te ridata, hauing Refeph (which he calleth Rejepba) on the left hand, and G&muk, Ap* Tab.i. 

1 o (which he calleth Thelbe-canne) on the right hand, not far from whence is alio found 
the Cittie of Mann- canne vpon Tigris ± and all thefc feated together , as Efay an d Eze- 
ffcV haue forted them. Butthevnderftanding ofthefe places is the more difficult, 
becaufc Affyria (which the Chaldeans call ^Anuria) and Mefbpoixmia , were fb often 
confounded .-the one taken for the other by interchange of Dominion. Affpm& 
Mefopot amia in Babylonia name stranfiaunt (faith N J g s r } ) iylffyria andMefapbta-, cefmeg.^Sg 
mia tooke the name of Babylonia. Laftly , it appeareth by thofe adiacent Regions by 
the Prophets named, in what part of the world Eden is feared , as, by Charran or Ba- 
rm in Mefopotamia : alfb by Canneh and Refeph, according to the opinion of Vaublus, 
who in thefc wordes tranflateth this place: Piantaucrat tutem Iehovaii Deufbor- 

20 turn in Eden, ab Oricnte, The Lord Cod planted agarden in Eden, Eaftward: that is (faith 
heinhis Annotations.) Iufferatnafciarborcs in Eden, Regwne.Oricntdi, infiniltis Ara- 
bia & Mefopotamia, He commanded trees to grow in Eden, an Eafteme Region in the bor- 
ders of Arabia and Mefopotamia. 




M 



f X. 

Of diners other tefi 'monies of the land of Eden; and that this is the 

Eden of Paradfe, 

• Nd for a moreparticular pointing out of this Eden, it feemes by the two 
I Epiftles oflheNeflorianCbriftuns, that mlubkc Mefopotamia, which 
Epiftles m the yeare 1-552. they fent to the Pope about the confirming 
of their Patriarch, and Andram.Mafp-ss hath published them, tranflated 
out of Sjriac into Latine.-- By thefc EpiftJes.(I fay) it feemes we may 
haue fomp farther light for the proofe of that, which we haue /aid about the Region 
of Eden in thofe parts. For in them both there is mention of the If and at Eden in the 
Riuer TigrUyOt at leaft, Tigris in both thefc Epiftles is called the Riuer of Eden. This 
//Was Mafw in his Prafice to thefc Epiftles faith, is commonly called Gozoria (as it 
. wete,tbe//!anJ, hyanemmencie) Ithath (faith he) tenne miles in circuit', and was 
40 fometimes walled round about, which name ofthe /{land Eden may (doubtiefTe) re- 
maine to this day 5 though in the reft of the Region fo called this name be fw.tllow- 
ed vp, with the fame of thofe flourishing Kingdomes of Mefopotamia, Affyria, Babylo- 
nia, mdchaldea. This IflandofEden hath vp the Riuer, and not farrc beyond it, the 
UttieofHafan-Cepha, otherwifc FortU Petra ; below it, it hath Mofalox Mojel, from 
which (asinthatwhichfolloweth it ihall appeare out of Mafias) it is not aboue 
twelue miles diftant. Neitheris it to troubl e vs, that Mofdor CMfel by Mar ins Ni- 
ger is remembred among the Citties higher ^Tigris, in thefc w.ordes. luxtaautem rtfi.pl 
TtgrimfiiuttatesfuntporbetapropeTatirummontem^ua nunc Mofddicitur, magna fa- 
»e,&c. (that is). fiy,Tigru are tbefeCitties , VorbetanearevntomountTaurusfwimb 
jounove called Mofel).ysbich U a great one, &c. This opinion of Hjger, difplacing AUG/, 
and making it to bs.Pprbeta (I fay) needes nothere to trouble vs : feeing for this mat- 
ter, the tefhmonie of Maf as informed by the chrtfiians that dwelt there (the Seat of 
whofc Patriarch it is) oijght to be of credit, auowing that this Mofal (or Mozd) is i n 
the confines of Mefopou mia and. Affyria, feated vpon Tigris , and in the neighbour- 

F 2 hood 



h 






51 



- ■'- ■ - ' -■■ ■ - ■ - ■ -■■-- ■ , - 

The fir ft ! Boo{e of the fir ft part Cha p.^.io. 



hoodofMww.fi and chat it is the famous Seleucia Parthorum. The NcUorianChri- 
Jlians in their former epiftle call it Attur in thefe words : Ex omnibus Cmttattbiu & 
pagis qutfunt circumCiuitatem Mozalfhoc eft) Attur in vtciniaNimues i O fall the Cit- 
ties andtownes which are about theCittcof Mozal (that ii) Attur in the neighbourhood of 
Nimue. As alfo Niger acknowledged} cte/iphon, a Cittie thereabout to be called Af- 
Jur (which is the fame as Attur, after the Dialctl ofthofe Nations, which change sh 
ir^o r.) Neither is it much that he fhould miftake Ctejiphon (which is not farre off Se- 
leucia) tor Seleucia, to htAjfur. By this then we may come fomewhat neere the end 
of our purpofe. For the//* of Eden, which lyeth in the breaft of Tigris, is but twclue 
miles from c^yi/, and that andentQttie, which»fl/^andr«/Aw call winns 10 
and the Scriptures Ntniuc, Philottratm, and Simeon Sethi, Mofula, and lobn Leon Mo- 
/^others Mojfe, (though it be not the fame with Mofid) isfet but a little higher 
vpon the fame riuer ofTigris, ncereUMcfah.fo that we are like to finde this//, of 
Eden heere-about. For the fame Andrtat CHafm which placeth it aboue UMofal 
makes it to be bclowe Hafdn-chepha, which is vpon the lame riuer of f igris. ' 

Theonely difficultie is this,that fomeperhaps may thinke, that the words ofthc 
^jiiortans in both their epiftlesfpeake not ofany Hem Tigris, called the He of£*», 
but of an He in Tigris* anuer of Eden. But this fenfe of their words in my opinion fee- 
meth the more vnprobable. And yet ifthis were themcaning heere, we haue a tefti- 
moniefromthelearnedofthofeparts,thatnotonely£«^r4/«, butalfoT> e w was 2CJ 
anuer of Eden, and that the name of Eden in thofe parts is not yet quite wot nc out ' 

though the Regionhathbeenefubiedltothefamechangc,thatall other kinadomes 
of the world haue beene, and hath by conqueft, and corruption of other languages 
recemed new and differing names.For the South part of£<fc*,which ftretcheth oner 
Euphrates^ after the floud called Shinar, and then of the tower of Babel, Babylo- 
ma . and the North part ofEden is that Trad of Mefopotamia, Afyria.znd Armenia, 
which embraceth both the banks of Tigris, betweene Mount Taurus, and Seleucia. 
And of this Region of Eden that auncient Aethuvs maketh mention, (noc 

that latter A£THicv S difcipleofCAi. L ,Nicvs,otherwifebyPi.vTAKCHand 
A t H e n ae v s called Ism,, who liued in ^£gypt in the raigne of P h i l a d e l- so 
l' h v ^ but an otherofa farre higher and remote time) the fame being made Latine 
outofGreekeby S.Hiehome. And though by corruption of the ancient coppie 
it be written in Ae t h i c v s Adonu, for Edenis, yet Adonis being a riucr of P hJni- 
eta, cannot be vnderftood to be the region named by Ae t h i c v s. For Ae t h i- 
c v s makes it a Countrie, and not a riuer,and ioyneth it with Mefopotamia. and „£- 
thiopi ^calling the land of Ch v s Ethiopia, after the Vulgar.and Septuagint- And 
lait y, the nuer which watereth the Regions (fayth Ae t h i c v s) fallcth into the 
Gulfe of />«•/?<: which riuer he calleth Armodius, for Tigris ; Tigris being but a 
n-ime impofed for the fwiftneile thereof And out of Armenia both Tigris and Eu- 
phrates haue their originall : for out ofEden came a riuer, or riuers, to water the ear- 40 
den both which nuers (to wit) Tigris and Euphrates come out of Armenia, and 
both of them trauerfe^y^^wM, Regions firftofall knowneby the name ofE- 
den for their beautieand fertilitie. And it is very probable, that Eden contained alfo 
fome part of Armenia, and the excellent fertilitie thereof in diuers places is not vn- 
worthie the name of Eden. For in fome part thereof (fayth S t r. a b o) the leaues 
are alwayes greene,and therefore therein a perpetuall Spring. Alfo S t e p h a n v s 
de vrbibm mentioneth the Cittie of Adana vpon Euphrates : and the name of Eden 
was in vfe in Amos time.though he fpeake not of Eden in the Eaft.but ofEden in cm- 
lejjria. But to the end I may not burden the readers patience with too Ion" a dif- 
courfe.it may fuffice to know,that Euphrates and Tigris (once ioyned together and to 
afterward feparate) are two of thofe foureheads, into which thefe riuers which are 
iayo to water the garden of Par adifi, werediuided: whofe cburfes being knowne, 
Eden, (out of wh.ch they are %d to come) cannot be vnknowne. Now that Hidde- 
*f/and Peutb were Tigrk and Euphrates it is agreed by all „• for the Seuentie and all 

others 






• • 




']•!,!, 



\^Z ,: ^3f 



TTT 



C h a p . i .§. I o . of the Hijiorie of the IV Grid. 



Others conuert PerMh by Euphrates, & Hiddekel Tigrim omnes exponunt : and all men 
vnderftand Hiddekcl by Tigris (fayth Vat able.) And becaufe that which Ihaue 
fayd of the He of Eden, (hall not be fubiec c to the c-eniure or 'f elfrnuemion I hane 
heere-vnder let downe the words out of the two generall epiftlcs of the NeHorians 
as Majhs (adverbum) hath conuerted them into Latine. The occalion of thofe let- 
ters and (applications to the Pope were, that the Ne'storian christians which inhabit 
Mcfofotamta, Afsyria, Pcrfea, and Babylonia, andhaue to this day (atTeaft in Queen? Mi- 
nes time they had) fifteene 'Churches in one Cittie, called Seleucia Partbvrttm, or 

c>^/vponthcriuerofr/^,hauingnofufficientauthoritietodioofcthcmfc'iues 
io a Patriarch (which cannot be done without fewer or three Metropolitan Biihops at 
leaft) fent to the Bilhop of Rome in the yeare ofChrift 1552 (as aforefaid) a Pe- 
tition to obtaine allowance vnto fuch an election as themfelues had made ■ hauinp 
three hundred yeare before that vpon thclike defect, fent one Marans thither to be 
confirmed ; and in this negotiation they make knowne to the Bifhop of 'Rome the 
ftate of thechrislran Church in thole parts: for vpon the death of their Patriarch 
(who of a couetous deiire to enrich himfelf had forborneto mftitute Metropolitan 
Bifrops, when the places fell void) they all aflembled themfelues together to confult 
of the Church-gouernmcnt.And bccaufea'I the Patriarchs for 100 yeares had been 
ofone houfe and familie to the prejudice of the Church, and that there yet remai- 
j.o ned one Bilhop of thefame flock and kindred, who afpired tothefarne dienitie 
which his Predeceflbiirs had held, thereft of the Profeffours refufed to allow him! 
Vpon which occafion,and for thechoice ofa Gouernourmorefiifficient. the Tea- 
chers in all the Churches affembled themfelues. The words of the general! epiftie 
to the Pope are thefe, about the middle ofthc fayd epiftie. return ms non accepuui- 
| mm neque proclamauhnus ipfum, fed fubito conuemmas ex omnibus locis Orientalibus 
& ex omnibus Ciuitatibm & Pagis qu.<efunt arcum Cmitatem Mofelfhoc eft) Attar ia 
vicinia Niniues, ex Babylonia, ex Charrha,ex Arbella, ex Infula qut eft in medio TiJris 
fiumtnis,Eden,ex Tauris Perfu, ex Nifibi, efr.which is, But we did neither accept of tins 
man neither pronounced him: but fuddenly we affembled our fehes out of all parts of the 
3 o Eafl, and out of all the Cities and Milages which are about Mofelfor AtturJnei*bbouriwr 
TQmuejwdout of Babylon, Carrha, Arbella, andont of the /land which lyeth in'the middl* 
of Tigris, a rmer ofEden,or rather,««? of the He ofEden,which lyeth in the riuer Tims 
And m a fecond epiftie at thefame timefent, they vfe thefe words : Neque fupcrfunt 
apudnos Metropolis, quorum eft or dtnare Catholicum, fed foli panel Epifcopi, EpifLtu 
AroeU Epifcoptu Salmafti, Epifioptts Adurbeigan ; en e vestigia conuemmta in Infulam, ' 
qax eft intra Tigrim fumen, Eden , fecimnfy compnttum inter nos ejre. (which is) 
Neither are there remaining among vs any Metropolitan B^ops towhome it belong to 
or dame a Patriarch, but onely a few Bifaps, as, the Biftlop of ' ArbeU, the Bifljop ofSaima- 
jtiis, andtheBijhop of Adurbeigan: butloe we affembled fbeedily inthe lUndEden, which 
4® i* in Tigris, and agreed betweene our f ekes &c. 

Now this Hand of Eden CMafms defenbeth with other places; which being well 
concerned, the Nctiwitn epiftles, and the ftateofthe Church may be in thofe parts 
Uaythhe) the better vnderftood. And after hehathdiftinguifhedthe fewer forts 
otCta&ans in thofe parts of the world, and in the South part of Africa, which hee 
cailetn Nc?hruns,Iacobites,<JAUroniU;\wi Cophti,\\z socth on in thefe words : Mox, 
audita illnis morte, concurriffe aiekint tumultuario in ilkm quam modo dixi Tigris infti- 
l*m, qiuduodecim circiter paffuum mittibm fupra Mofalpofita, decern feu milliap.-Mum 
J 110 amktucontinet, muris vndiq, cinc7a,cr'apaticis alus quhn Chriffianis homimbm ha- 
bit at a ■ which is, Now hearing of the death of the Patriarch (as thofe that cam e to Rome 
jo rc T°"M) they ran tiimultuoujty together into that Ilandof Tigris or Eden before fpoken 
of, Which Hand is fit uated about izmtlcs aboue Mofel, containing very neere ten miles in 
con- pafe and cuery where inuironedwithawall, inhabited by a few other men than Cbri- 
films. And afterward he maketh a recapitulation ofthc Chriftian Churches; amoftg 
the reft headdeththe Ifieofi^by the name ofoy^,/^ Tigris: fine Ceferta. 

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Furthermore, deferring the Citie ofHofan-cepba, or F*m> Petra, he placeth it /W 
f reditlam Tigris /nfulamrupi after* impofitam, above theforefaid /land of Tigris, ban? 
fiatedonafieeperock. Ofthisllandofff^rw AndrewTheuet maketh mention in his 
tenth book of his generall Cofmographie inthefe words: Ceferta cuGeSreefim 
milieude la rmiere da Tigre, & fenfi q* ceft <v»e terre desylus ferules detouteUfe. 
Gcjerta or Gcjire is in the middle of Tigris, tbefoile the mefl fertile of all Apt 

BythBwefeethattheancientnarneoff^liueth^ndofthat^^whichlyeth 
Eaftwardfrom^/*/w, M , and the Defart where CMofes wrote, and that£*» 
which borderethcW* according to Ezechiel, and that Eden which is fcated ac- 
cording to theaffertion ofthe laid Prophet, and ioyned with thofe Nar.ons of Re- to 
JephCanneh, anc \charran, and the reft which traded with the Tyrians, and isfound 
at this day in the parting ofthe two Regions oU(fyria and Babylonia, where the 
Edenites ,n Thelafa, -were garnfond to rcfift the Ajfyrians, whofe difplantation Se- 
pacbevhmmtti of(asaboue written) andlaftly, the fame Eden, which embraceth 



$■ XL 
O/Vfo #/$»/?£ in the Text, which feemcth to make the four e 
riuers to rifefrm one fire ante. 



20 




1^ 1^7 , blei5le o d ' that 't ^ wntten in the Text, r^/^ i?/^ r „,^ 

' Zl i :, a ^ n0t ^ Uer3 i ,nt L hePlural WhKhfcrupl e ^^ B , & . 

. roaldus hath thus anfwered in his chronologie : The Latine Tranfla- 

non (faythhe) hath thefe wor<k: EtfiuuiL egrediebaJllocl^ 

tatisadtrrigandum Paradtfum, qui inde diuidebatur mauatuor capita- 

^rbamd'usconfenuenteumretnarrauone.dreiufdeme,^^^ 

^/J^m,^i„dedimdebatur,^ 

outofthe »\°f/<freto»aterrarad^ 

wordsCfayth Beroaldtv) doe better agree with the narration and exp ,„ on ofth, 

P Iac ^ykethustranflated ; ^^ 

^ff^^tfi^segrediebaturdedel^ 

in ftead of Eden ; and the Latine addeth the word W'or place EtZu7L!S,l 

and ferule and foalfo the word («,*) and ^^wasdiuiddfhathrefoeSSe Ar, 
Countneof£^»,and not to the garden it fclfe. . -""raerencetotiie 43 

And for theword Wr) for riuers, it is vfuall among the Hebrewes • for it h 
y>«™-^r<bbudfoM 

&c Heerc the Hebrew vfeth the Singular for the Plural] , hclbe and Teetlads 
and trees ; and agame,we eat ofthe fruit ofthe tree, in ftead of f trees ■ ^ A nAtuZ 1 

£f %,wh.c 1 vponthisplaceof^^fiy, thatthe Hebrewes doe often nut Ae 

uuse 1 uei l onitielie,as^'n«^(for«»f«)w^ ( 7 W ^£^». ° • 
_ And this anfwere out of diucrs ofthe learned,'mav not tvirhnm^^ r u 5 

Srcafonwcm^ 
*cr) rcaton we may expound the fowcr heads, to be fowcr notablepalfegcs into fa- 

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mous Countries. Ancifo we may take the word (riuer) vcrfe the tenth for one riuer 
(to wit) Euphrates, as this name comprehended! all the branches thereof] For this 
Riuer, after he is pad the place, where we fuppofe Paradife to hffiie beene, diuides 1 1 
felfe,and erelong yeeldeth fowcr notable paflages into ieuerall Countries, though 
notallthewaydowneftreame, (for this is nowhere intheText) where it is noted 
that following the riuer downeward,there is conucyance into the Countries named' 
in the Text, though part oftheway to one ofthe Countries (to wit, to^Af/Jria, 
were vp Tigris. 

Tothis end the Textfpeakingof^/^efe/, as it rileth from the Riuer of£^, 
10 doth not fay it compafleth or waiheth the whole Region of Ajjyria, (as it hadvfed' 
thisphrafeofiV/waad Gehon) but that it runneth toward Aflyria. The firft branch 
Pifon, is Nahar-makha, (by interpretation) Bajttm, ox flumen regimn , which runneth 
into Tigris vnder Apamia, whence arifeth the name oi'Pafitigrts, (as it were) Pifo-ti- 
gris. This leadeth to the land of Hamla or Su/iana. The fecond branch Gehon , is 
that which in Hiftorians is Mharferes, or Mrrragas, for Nahar-ragas : both which 
mmesdgn&eflumen denuatum (a riuer denued) alia Acracanm , quafi Rmofits , by 
reafon of the froggie fennes which it maketh : this Gehon leadeth to the firft featc of 
Chm t about the borders of chddaaani Arabia, and it is loft at length in the Lakes of 
Chaldxa. Thethird branch-, Hiddekd, may be expounded the vpperftreame of Pz- 
20 fen, or Bafllius,whkh tunncthimo Hiddekd properly fb called (that is, into Tigris) 
aboue Seleima, where it fheweth a paflage vp Tigris into Ajfyria : where , becaufe at 
length it is called Hiddekd, or Tigris, hauing before no knowne proper name, die 
Text in this place calleth it Hiddekd from the beginning. The fourth Perath or Eu- 
phrates, Co culkdper excdlentum, being the Bodie ofthe Riuer Euphrates, which run- 
neth through Babylon and Otris. But, be it a riuer, or riuers , that come 'out of Eden, 
feeing that Tigris and Euphrates are noted in the Text,there can be no doubt,but than 
Paradifewas not farrefrom thefe Riuers : forthat Perath in Mofes is Euphrates , there 
can be no queftion ; and (mdeede) as plaine it is that Hiddekd is Tigris. For Hiddekd 
goeth (faith Mofes) Eaftwards towards Ajfur, as we finde, that Tigrish the R merof 
30 Affyriapropnedicla,whokch\ekC\mcwzsMniue, as in Gene/is the tenth it is writ- 
ten: That out of that land (towit) Babylonia, Nimrod went into Ajjur , andbuilded 
Nmiue, which was the chiefc Cittie oi^ijjyria. 

And as for thekindeof fpeechherevfedinfhe Text.fpeakingoffoureheads; 
though the heads of Riuers be ( properly ) their fountaines , yet hereare they to be 
vnoerftood, to be fpokenof the beginning of their diuifionfrom the firftftreame. 
Caput aqux (faith V l p i a n v s) ilkdeft, vndc aqua nafatur ; fi ex fontc nafcaturfons ; 
fiexflumine,velexlacu prima initiate, if the beginning ofthe water be out of a foun- 
tain, thtn is thefottntaine taken for the head: if out of a lake, then the lake ; and if from 
r a mame riuer any branch be feparate and diuided, then where that branch doth firft 
40 bound it felfe with new bankes, there is that part ofthe riuer , where the branch for* 
faketh the maine ftreame, called the head of the riuer. 



£. XII. 

Ofthe flrange fertilise xndhafpineffe of the Babylonian foile, as it it certaine 
that Eden was fiich. 

|T mayalfo be demanded, whetherthis region of £<&«, byvsdefcri-. 
> bed, be of fuch fertihtie and beautie , as Eden the feateof Paradtfe was : 
1 which if it be denied, then milft we alfb confider, that there was no 
\ part of the earth, that retained that fertilitie and pleafure, that it had , 
before the curfe : neither can we afrribe the fame fruitfulneffetoany 
pAf^f r h ccarttl » n °r the fame venue to any plant thereon growing,, that they had 

before 




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before the floud ; and therefore this Region of Eden may be now no fuch flouri (h 
mg Countrie, as it was when it wasfirft created in his perfection. Yet this I rinde 
amd. clhH.i, wntten of it : Firft in Herodotus, who was an eye-witncfTfr, and fpeaketh of the very 
place it felfc, for the //fc of £i«* is but twelue miles or thereabout from Mtrne, and 
SoiromCMojal. Ex Euphrate extern in Tigrim, alurumflumen, tuxtaquodVrbs minus 
fitaerat,H<iLcregio,ommumquasnosvidimu6,optimaesJ,&c. Where Euphrates runneth 
out into Tigris, not fare from the flue where Nmua is feated, This Region, of all that we 
haiiefeene,ismoft excellent; and he addeth afterward. Cererisautemfruhuprocreando 
aded ferAxefr, vt nunquhn nonfere ducentareddat, ejre. (that is) It is Jo fruitful! in bring- 
ing forth Come, that it yeeldeth two hundred fold : Theleaues ofwheate and Barley hem? 
■almoftfourc fingers broads , ^f s -f w the height of Millet and Sefame , they are euenin 
length like vnto trees, which although I know to be true, yet I forbcare tofpexkehereofweH 
knowing, that thofe thinges which are reported ofthisfruitfulneffe,willfeeme very incredi- 
ble to thofe, which neuer were in the Countrie of Babylon. They haue commonly m allthc^ 
Comtrie Palme-trees growing of their owne accord, themost of them bearing fruit, out of 
which they make both meats,andwine, andhonme, orderingthem us the Fir-trees Thus 
farre Herodotus. * 

To thisjPalmc-tree Co much admired in the Ea& India, Strabo and Z&geraddca 
fourth exccITencic, which is, that it yeeldeth bread; Ex qmbm panem,6° mel & finum 
& acetnm conficmnt, Of which thefe people make bread, wine, honme, and-umeger But o 

^^w^theEr^^findethahftcommoditi^notinfenourtoanyofthoiefoure 
which is, that from this felfe-famc Tree there is drawne a kind of fine flaxe ofwhich 
people make their garments, and with which in Eaft India they prepare the cordage 
tor their fhips ; and that this is true ^Atbamfrmm thelife oC Antomm the Eremitefr 
conrcflcth, faying : That he receiueda garment made thereof from the Eremite hmifdfe 
wd;co he brought with him out of this Begion. So therefore thofe trees, which the Eaft 

/W/«fohighlyefteemeandfomuchadmire(asindeedetheEarthyeeldethnoplanc • 
comparable to this) thofe trees (J Shy) are mzhisvpper Babylon, or Region of £&* 
ascommonasanytrecsofthefield. Suntetiam (faith Stkabo) pafrim per omnem* 
regionemPalmxfuafpontenafcentes, There are of Palmes oner all thewhole Renon ?row- 70 
mgoftheir owne accord. Of thisplacefiwjaftwCarrfwmakeththisreport: Emtibm 
a parte Una Arabu odorum fertilitatcnobilis, regio campefrris interefr inter Tigrim & Eu- 

P>^temtacenstamvbere&pinguif Q lo,vtlipajlurepellipecoradicantur,nejatietasperi- 
mat, (that is) ^As you trauatle on the left hand of Arabia (famom for plentie of fweet o- 
dours) there lyeth a champaine Countrie placed betweene Tigris andEuphrates^dfofrmt- 
full an •dfatafoile,that they are faidto dnue their cattell from the pafiure , leaf they Ihould 
perifhbyfatietie. Bis in anno fegetes Babyloni) fecant, The Babylonians cut their come twice 
ayeary (faith s^iger.J And as Countries generally are more fruitfull to the South- 
ward, then in thcNorthern parts : fo we may iudgc the excellcncic of thli Bythat re- 
port which Strabo makcth of the South part of Armenia, which is the North border , * 
ox Eden, or a part thereof; his wordes be thefe in the Latme, Tot a enimhse reno fm- 4 
gibiu&arloribusabundatmanfuetls^tem^fempervirentibus, This Region aboundetb 
With pieafam fruits, andtrees alwaics greene : which witneflah a perpetuall Spring not 
found elfewhere but in the Indies only, by reafon ofthe Sunnesneighboifrhood' the 
liteandftirrervpofnaturcinaperpetuallaaiuitie. Inbriefefo great is the fertilitie 
oi the ground , that the people are conflrained twice to mow downe their corne- ^ 
nelds, and a third time to eate them vp with fheep : which h ufbandrie the Spaniards 
wanting ln the Valley of 'Mexico, for the firft fortieyearcs, could not make our kinde 

fw b u C , fcedc ' but k § rew V P as hi g h as thc trces > ^d was fruitleiTe. Befides, 
tnoleheldsarealtogethcrwithoutweedes (faith Plime) who addeth this fineulari- KQ 
etothatfoile,ThatthefecondyearetheveryftubbIe (orrather foiling downe of 5 , 
theieedes againe) yeeldeth them a harucft of Come without any further labour .-his ' - ^ 
woioes ai e thcie : vbertatistanu fnnt, vtfequenti anno fronterefrtbilis fiat feges. 

$. XIII. 



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$. XIII. 

0/7£<? £/«<?>• P//W, and the land of Hauilah, 

Fter the difcouerie of £dS?# , and the teftimonies of the fertilitie there- 
Jofjitreftethtoproue that i>//tf» and Gehon are branches of Tigris, and 
I Euphrates. For that the knowledge and certainety of thefe two riuers 
'. (hould trouble fo many wife men, it is ftrange to me, feeing neceffitie it 
felfe (Tigris and Euphrates being knowne) tindeth them out : for Eu- 
1 phrates or Tigris, or both be that riuer or riuers of Eden, which water iW^,which 
riuer or riuers cJJf^witnefTeth afterward ; diuided into foure heads, whereof the 
one is called Pifon,the other Gehon&Q. Could there be a ftranger fancie in the world, 
then when welind both thefe (namely) T/gmand Euphrates in ^Ajjyriaznd Mefopo- 
tamia,toreeketheothcrtwGitiIiidiaandEgjrpt, making theone Ganges, andthed- 
ther Mus ? Two riuers as farre diftant , as any of fame knowne or difcouered in the 
world: the Scriptures making it fo plaine, that thefe riuers were diuided into foure 
branches: and with the Scriptures,Nature,rlcafon and Experience bearing witneffe 
• There is no errour , which hath not forne flipperie and bad foundation, or feme ap< 
, P ara {ice of prooabilitie refembling truth, which when men (who fludie to be fineu- ) 
2olar)hndeout,(ftrainingreafonaccordiagtotheirfancies) they then publifh to the / v 
world matter ofcontention,and jangling : not doubting but in the variable deformi, CU- 
tieof mens minds to findefome partakers or fedfatours, the better by theirhelpe to j w 
nurfe and chcnfli fuch weake babes, as their owne inuentions haue begotten 

But this miihking (and firft for the riuer of Pifin) feemeth to haue growne out of 
thenotdiuinguiftiingofthatR.egionin/«&, cAXcdHauilah, from Hauilah, which 
adioyneth to Babylonia, afterward knowne by the name of SuJIana. For Hauilah v p. 
on Tigris tookenamefrom /to^thefonneofcv^ and HauMin Indiafrom Haul, 
Uhthelonneof iocJan theone remembred by J/^inthedefcription of Paradife, Gnt97 
r theotherwhereii/<«fettethdowne the generations df Noah and his formes after ' 

30 thenoud. Forthefonnesof Cu/hwereSeba, Hiuikh, Sabtah, and ^W^andthe 
lonnesof/^wereo^, and Hauilah, &c of which later ftowit) of Ophirmd 
Hauilah the fonnes ofloifm, that llandofophir , (whence Salomon had gold) and Ha- 
^adioyninghadtheirnames. Nowbecaufe Ganges is a great and a famous riuer 
ottheEaft India, and Hauilah a Countrey of theiame,and isfituated vpon Ganges, 
henceit came that -Gaagavm taken for Fifon, whichnuerisfaidby Ms to water 
™ ndo ™^- Orp^psit wa , s fu PP° fedt hat thofe foureriuers, named by 
^/^muftofneceffitiebefoure of the greateft in the world ; whence (fuppofing 
that Ganges was the next great and famous riueraf ter Tigris and £«/>/W/,they chofe 
outtnisnuertomakeoneofthefoure. Andyetcertainely there is an other riuer, 
40 whomeintheferefpecbthey fhould rather haue cholenthen Ganges; fortheriuer 
Indus on this fide mdia,fox bcautie,for ncarnefrc,and for abilirie,giueth no way place 
toG^^butexceedethitinall. Andhowcanany reafonable man conceiue, that 
Ganges can be one of the foure heads: feeing W**commeth bet weeneit and Tow- 
ard betweene Tigris and Indus is all that large Empire of Perfia , confifting of many 
Mngdomes. And againe, farther toward the Eaft , and beyond Indus,, are all thofe 
ample Dominions of Tndiaintra Gangem, which lie betweene thofe two proud riuers 
ot Indus md Ganges, now called the Kingdome of Mogor. So as if Indus bee not ac- 
counted for any of the foure, becaufe it is rcmoued from Tigris by all the breadth of 
f rerfia ^then how much lelTe Ganges, whichfalleth intothe Ocean, little lefle then 
JO tortic degrees to the Eaftward of Indus I Surely whofoeuer readeth the Stone ofA- 
lexander (hall hnde, that there is no riuer in Ajia, that can exceede Indus. For Hydaf. 
tu was of that breadth arid'depth , as Alexander thereon in great Galhes tranfported 
himfelfr and the grcn^ft part ofhis armie,and in fivling downe that branch of indu*, 
.found it fo laigeand deepe, and by reafon thereoffo great a billow, as it endangered 
>vt>^ ff^-h his 




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The fir ft 'Booke of the fir ft pan Cha p.3.^.13. 



his whole Fleete, which was readie to be fwallowed vp therein : Hydaftis (as afore- 
faid) being but one of many branches of-Indus, comparable to it, and as great as it, 
hauing belidcs this,the Riuers ofCoa*,ofSnaFtus,AceJines,Adris, (otherwife Wrote) 
WJpalu, and ZWr«,all which make but one Indus, and by it are fwallowed vp 
With al 1 their children and companions, which being all incorporate and made one 
ftreame,it crofTeth athwart Afia, and then at Cambaia vifiteth the Ocean Sea. 

But becaufe Pifon, which compaffeth Hauiiah,as alfo Gehon, which watereth Cujb, 
■muft fomewhere beioyncd with the reft in one bodie, or at leaft be found to pn> 
cecd out ofthe fame Countrie of &&», out of which the other two heads doe pro- 
cecd,outofdoubt they cannot either theone ortheother,beG.rw«,orM/*/for 10 
■Wjlus nfcth in the vttermoft of the Southland runneth Northward into the UMedi- 
ierran Sea ;nndthc Kmer Ganges nfcth out of the mountaine Imaus, or (as others 
will haue it) Caucafus, which diuides the Northerne ScytbU from India, and runneth 
from North to Southinto the Indian Ocean. And as for Peratb mi Hiddekelithms 
Euphrates and Tigris) the one of them js begotten in Armema,neere Georriana or ibe. 
ritt, the other not farre oft in.the Enactment*, by the Cardigan mountaines fo as 
Ganges whoonely trauaileth in hevowm India, and Tijlus through Ethiopia and 
^//tf.neuerfaw the land of Eden, orioyned themfelues in one Channell either 
with themfelues, or with either of the other 5 and therefore could not at any time 
from thence befeparatcd, or diuided into fewer heads or branches, according to 20 
UHofes. & 

. Th ?£ Forc the R iuei "^M which enrichcthfl-^/7^, is the fame whichbyioy- 
ning it fe fe with Tigris, was therefore called Pifi-tigris, or Pifo-tigris, of Pi fox and 
Tigru,whichnucr watereth that Hauilah, which Hautlah thefonneofCvsH sauc 
name vnto,and not Hauilah oflndiafo called of Ha v i l a h the fonne of I octan 
who inhabited with his ; brother Opbu in the EM. And this JWM ofthe c«- 
fhiteshnth alfo Gold, Bdellium, and the Onyxftone. This Bdellium isa tree ofthe 
bigneiTeofanOhue,whereof^«foj hath great plentie, which yeeldeth acertaine 
gumme, fweet to fmell to, but bitter in tafte, called alfo Bdellium. The Hebrewes 
take the Load-fkme for Bdellium. BWrfwaffirmeth, that AM. in Hebrew fieni- 
heth Pearlc : fo doth Eugubmus; and Hierome calls it OleaHer : beit what it will a tree 
bearing gumme,or peark : Hamlah,or Sufiana hath plentie of both.Now this Coun- 
tne of Sufiana or Hauilah ftretchcthit felfe toward the North, as farre as the Altars 
ofHenuies^nd from thence embraceth all that Tradf ofland Southwards farre as 
the Per ftanGulfe, on theEaftiide thereof: from which Eaftfide had the Shebans 
(which traded with the Qttie ofTyre, according to Ezechiel) their greatplentie of 
gold, which Strabo alfo witnefTeth, as was (hewed before. 

The Greckes had a conceipt, that Pifon was Vanubins : the -Rabbins take it for 
Ndus. ^Aben-ezra (fayth Hopkins) out of Rabbi Saadia tranflateth^/yfeintoM/**- 
But Niltu findeth the fame impoffibilitie that Ganges doth : and Danubiw hath the 
Seaof/^&^«/andalU/?,ithelefIe,betweeneitandr/^. Now Pifon which run- 
neth through Hauilah or Sufiana, doth to this day retaine feme figne of this name - 
for where it and Tigris embrace each other vnder the Cittie of Apmia. there doc 
they agree ofaioynctand compounded name, and are called Pifi-thris. And it is 
ftrangevntome, that fromfe great anticpitie therefhould be found remayninganv 
refemblmg found ofthe firft name: for Babylon it felfe, which dwelleth fe neere 
thefenuers, is byfome writers knowne by the name ofBandas,as,byPo!M^,by 
CaHaldus oiBaldach :by Barius, of 'Bagdad , and ofBoughedor, by Andrew Theuet;md 
yctali thofe that haue lately feene it, call ItBagdet. Tothis riuer of Pifin, Ptolomie 
indeed with many others.giue the name of Bafilius, or Regius, and Gehon they terme * a 
UWahar-Jares and Marfias, and Baar fares. So is Euphrates, neere the Spring and foun- ' 
taine,by Strabo and ^called Pixirates i by lunius, Puckperathfitxt ofthe Hebrew, - 
(thatis) X he profuiion, or comming forth of Euphrates ■. where itbreaketh through 
themountainer rf «m,it takes the nameofOw;^. Plutarch calls it MedusmA Zaran. 

da.: the? 



3° 



40 












lift 



I ,— —— " -■■ ■ '- .-■■. . ■ ■ ■ '. I , ^F ■ 1 -~p- .. ■ .^t, — 

C h a p.}.5-'j- of the Hijiorie of the World, 



!L 



da •■ the Hebrewcs Par nth, (fayth Ar.Moatmus : J Pagnimts^ Tenth : lofefkusjhorth ; 
Eufebim, Zoz.imus : Ammianus, Cbalym.xus : GTsiilanus and Colir.utius cerme ic Cobar : 
which EzecbielaMcihchcbar ; but this is but a branch of Euphrates. The Xlfyiiant 
know it by the name of Armakbar or Naber Makba -.but now commonly it iscal- 
lcdFr.it. 

The fame confufion ofnames hath Tigris, as, Viglitoflnd Diglatb,Seilax, and Sol- 
lax : of the Hebrewcs it was called Hiddikel • now of the inhabitants Tegil. 

But tJMerr.tr vpon Gcw/fo conceiueth rightly of thefe riuers: for Euphrates and 
Tigris {&yth he) ftreame into fewer branches, two of which keepe their ancient 
I o names, and the other two, are called Pifon and Gehon. The reafbn,why thefe two ri- 
uers ioyncd in one (below Apamia) loofe their names, and are called Pifi-tigns, and 
the memoric of Euphrates extinguifhed,is,becaufe the beft part of Euphrates running 
through the channcll of Gehon, linketh into the Lakes ofchddia , not farre'ff cm Vr 
the Cittie of ^Abraham, and fall not intirely into the Perfhh Sea , as Tigris accompa- 
nied with Pifon doth. 

This errour that Pifon was Ganges, was firft broched by Jefeph us, (whole fields 
though they be fertile , yet are they exceeding full of w cedes) and other men (who 
takThis authoritie to be fufficient in matter ofdefcription, whereupon depended no 
other important confequence) were not curious in the examination thereof For 
■20 Epipbanim, ^Auguttine, and Hierome, take this for currant; whereofit followed,that 
as Pifon was.tranfported into the Eaft India,tb find out Hauilab ': fb was Gchon drawne 
into Africa, to compare ^Ethiopia. But if Hauilab, whereof (JMofes fpcaketh in the 
delcription of Paradfe,be found to be a Rcgion,adioyning to Babylon on the one fide, 
and ChJIj (which is falfly interpreted ^Ethiopia) fattened to it on the other fide , wee' 
fhall not neede then to worke wonders (that is) to irnpofe vpon men the tranfporta- 
tion of riuers, from one end of the world to the other, which (among other vies) 
were made to tranfport men. Now it was in the valley of Shinar, where Cull) the 
forme of Ham firft fate downe with his formes , Sheba, Hamlah, Sabtab, Raamah, Mm. 
rod,&c. and of Hauilab , the fonnes of Cufi , did that Region take name, which Pifon 
3 o compafleth ; and the land (called Cufb) which Gehon watereth , tooke name of Cup 
himfclfe. For as the fonnes of locJan, Opbir, and Hauilab, feated themfolues as neare 
together as they could in India, fo did the fonnes of Cufh and shinar or Babylonia, 
where T^mr^d built Babel: for Hamlah or Chauilah was firft Chiifra of Citfl ; then 
chufa, Su/a,and Sujiana. 



y 'tmttntn ftii'itifirii^ 



*}r 



From this Hauilab vnto the Defarts of Sur , did the ifraelitesmd Amalecbites pof 
idle all the interiacent Countries : for Saul fmote the Amalecbites from Hauilab to 
Sur : which Sur the Chaldxan Paraph alt conuerteth Hagra, zvAHagr.i bordereth the 
reddeSea; but this was not meant from Sur vpon the redde Sea, to Hamlah mths 
Eaft India, for Saul was no fuch trauaileror Conquerour, and therefore Hauilab muft 
40 be found nearer home, where the fonnes of Jfmael inhabited, and which Countrie 
Saul wafted : for Amalek and the Amalecbites poffeft that necke of Countrie, between 
the Perf an Sea, and thcredde Sea; Hauilab being the extreme ofthe one towards the 
tart, and Sur ofthe other, towards ^E^ypt And the Weft, leauing that great body of 
Arabia fdix towards the South ; and they fpredde themfelues with the Madtamtes 
mdEdumxans, from the Eaft part, or backe-fide ofthe Holie Land, to the bankes of 
Euphrates, compnfing the beft parts of Arabia Petr&a, wADcferta. 



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GfK.lO.V.II, 

Ewrf.17.8. 

Gen.a.u 

10. i)l 




$. XII II; 

■Of the Raw Gehon and the landofCuJh : and ofthe ill tranflating of the Ethiopia 
frrcujh. 2.Chron.2i. 16. 

Ow, as Mmitah in the Eaft India drew PifonCo ferrc out of his way thi- 
therto I fay did Cueing by the Scucntie tranflatcd Ethiopia Lrce 
Gehon into ^/W«. For Cu[h being taken for <^//mto by the Grcekcs 
whom die Latins followed, Gehon confequently was eftcemed for wl 
- lm. BntEthiopiajisjre^much,asblacke or burnt faces, whofeproper iq 

Coun triciscalled .Thebes, lyTn^totETSouthward ofall Egypt. AndAZh 

^rebemanyotherreg,onsof^^^ 

^arethofefooftenremembredinthe^^^Stories^ndoutofwhichNa- 
t.on they had many times their Kings oi^gjpt , all which Ethiopians are veTy 
neare, or clfe d.reftly vhder the Equinoctial! line, which is very farre from that land 
inhabitedbythec^ who are neither blacke of colour, Lmany fen la- 
bouring TomdaZona. But th.s Tranflation ofthe Septuagmt. PerentJdothSL 
mthismanner. Thereare (faithhe) two E^J,Jc Eaft, andSeWel^S 
this dim ion he findeth in Strabo, out of Homer. Now becaufe there is no colour to 
make CbubEthiopiam Africa, Pererim will make chufb and the land ofthe Chu- .* 

fw W h, f hl ^^^^ ; andapartof ^-ir^thehappc, with the Region of 

C%^»;tobetheEafte^E/fc^M. b 

Nowif 1 tbegrauntcd,thatc^andth c landoftheC^«, be that Tra£t from 
Jw to Hamlah according to the Scriptures : Habitauit I sua n L ab Hamlah vfaue Snr 
quz reftiat Egyptum mtroeuntibvs Afyrws, I s « a e l «W>>;* /&«&* £U J«r 

G f fe cannot be 2Vjte, but a riuer which watereth Cu/h, and not Ethiopia But this 
place of Scripture Habitauit Ismael^c. hath this fenfe. ifmael dwelt from fiJl 
wbchistheway ofo^.or the Countne bordering Ajyrk, and Sur, which [y! 

ethtoward^^,wh|chisasmuchto%,as,Theim.esof//feW(whereof thereon 
were twelue Princes) whom God had promifed to make a great people , inhabited 3 

allthoferegionsbetweenetheborderof^^and Ajjyria. And that they were 

^ccord.ngtothewordofGod)foincreaf e dandmultiplied ) itwellappeared, 7 wher; 
Zearabttechufte, which others call Tharantha, brought an Armie often hundred 
thoufandagainft^King ofiuda. Which Annie came not out o^thiopiabt 
yonj^f i forthathadbeene a ftrange progreffe for fuch a multitude, as ten 
hundred thoufind, haumg fo mightie a King as the King of Egypt, betweene Pall 

and c/to «. For it is written, that after ^(ftrcngthened by God) had defeated 

befufpeckd.-forthe^bethewordesoftheScripturedifprouingit • Lfnd AbTa- 
h A M departedtbenceUwardthe South Countne,and dwelt behveene Cadefi and Sur,and 

heirfoteafterthey pafled thcredde Sea, where the Amalechitesin LhiJimikton 
them, fuppofing that they had beene weary, and vnablc to refift. Againe, in the Sto- 

V Gera /ZT'T^I ^f™ }" Kc ™ tte *^*>™dtl Pbitiftimsvnt* 
?Zr u r ff fu , rC Jb ™t c r h and the ^^^ were no Ethiopians. And laftly 

we border of the Canaamtes was from Sydon^s thou commefl to Gerar : for Sydon was the «• 
cttrE^hoT P ^ do *™ th » honeft excufe ialue his Tranflationof 

fosethermifvnderftandthis place. Andfirft, tor Homers Ert and Wc& Ethiopia, 

they 



% 



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] P to 



Ch ap.]» §.^. of the Hijlorie of the World. 



61 



they are both found elfewhere. Yox Pltme'm his fife Bookeand eighth Chapter, ci- 
teth Homer for an Author, of thefc two Ethiopia's. But the Eaft ^/Ethiopia is that 
which coropafTeth Niltu to the South of Egypt , and is the South border thereof} 
now a part of the Empire of the Abyflmes,\ndcr Prefer lobn-, And the Weft Ethio- 
pians that,which joyncth it felfc with the riuer JVtger,v/hkh we call Senega and Cam- 
bria .-for thereabouts are thefc «^£M«^M/M,called Perorfi,Daratites,w\th diuers other 
names, which Pltnie numbreth. But all thefe are in Africa , and beyond the Vefarts p& . 
thereof, faith P/zw> out of Homer, ^_Agnppa,and Ittba; which Regions indeede (I 
mcane that of Niger, and that of Prefer lobn , and th e Troglodytes) lie d ue Eaft and 
I0 Weft. But as for Cu/h, and the Region of the lfmaelites,&c. they are extended di- 
reiftly North from that Ethiopia, which is beyond Egypt. Now,that Iofephus was 
exceeding grofTe herein, it appearethtiy that fiftion, which he hath ofMofes when 
he ferued Pharao, inthewarresagainftthet^/&^M»j;forintbat (to make chut, 
Eth'tsfu) hee tran/portcth CMadian by miracle ouer the Red Sea , and beyond all 
Egypt, and fetteth it in Ethiopia , as (hall be fhewed more at large in the Chapter 
of the worlds plantation. Againc, that Gehon was improperly tranilated Ntlas, Pe- 
rerins confeiTeth, and laicth it rather to the corruption of the Greeke copie , than o- 
therwife. And whereas the Septuagint haue conucrted this place of the Prophet 
H i er.e mi e. Andwhxthafithoutiowtodoemtbewayof Egypt , to drinke the water c.t.v.iS. 
20 ofNilst-s ? Quid tibi vis in via Egypti , vt btbas aquam Gehon ? to this faith Pererim, 
prof elf o Hebraic} ibi non efl vox Gebon , fed S ichor ,qud fignificat nigrum & turbidum ; 
Truly (faith Peher i vs) theword Gebon in this place, is not found in the Hebrew, but 
Sichor, whichfignifieth black an cltroubleth water. 

Furthermore, this is a manifeft and vnanfwerablc argument, that cfo« was ill ta- 
ken for Ethiopia. Mtfes maried the daughter of Ietbro,?t'mcc and Prieft ofMadian, £ rf 
whom both the Gw£*andZ<!tt'» call a Madianite,and not Ethiopian, as (with/*- j.'i." 
fephus) the Geneua conucrts it, though ithelpeit a little with a marginall note, mm.n.u 
Now it is without difpute , that Zipporab was of the Countrie ofMadian , which i* 
that part of Arabia Petrma, bordering the Red Sea ; for it is written in the fecond of 
go Exodus, that M o s e s fled from Phajao into thelandof Madhn, and fate downe by a p-.^. 
Well,&c. and aga ine, in the third of Exodus; When Moses kept thefbeepe efl e t i-i s. o r.i. 
his father inkw,PrieflofAUdian,drc.Indccd,tbcfc four nationsareeuery where mixt 
in the Scriptures,becaufe theydwell confufedly togcthcr(to wit)thc Madianites, the 
If mtelites, the Amalekites,mdthcCbiifites,which were all in one general! word, <^Ara- 
bians, and in the Scriptures fomctimes called byoneofthoienarnes,andiornerimes 
byaiiother 3 asinGf».37.t'.Z5.27.ef z%. that Iofeph wasfbld to the ifmaelttes; andin 
the fame chapter ,v. 3 6. it is written,that the Madianites fold Iofeph to Putiphar , Pha- 
rao s fteward. The Ger>euians,in a marginall note (to auoid this confounding of the 
Nations) fay ,that Mofes wrote according totheiropinion,whotcokethe Madianites 
40 and ifmaelttes to be all one. But CMofes wrote not after any mans opinion, he wrote 
the truth, and thefe wereall Arabims,and Co in this very place itappeareth by their- 
mcrchandife, which they brought with them, when they bought Iofeph .- for their 
Camtnells were loaden with fpiccrie,and Balmc,& Myrrhe, which are the trades of Cm.37.if. 
Arabia fwlix : from whence chiefly, and from the Eaft India , all the world is ferued 
with Myrrhc and Frankincenfe; and their Ipices they receiucd from the Eaft fide 
of the Arabian Gtdfe, asaforcfaid. And in the 39. Chapter it is laid : That Putiphar v.i. 
bought Iofeph of the ifmaelttes, which thechaldxan Paraphraft in the fame place cal- 
leth Arabiixs.Now,to make this the more manifeft,it is written in the 6. ofludz.es. 
That when ifrael had fowen.then came vp the Madianites, and the ^Amalekites, and v 
50 theyoftheEaft,andcamevponthem:theyofthcEaft,wereyf?-(j&woftbei)f/ir/'- 
Co as where before in the buying of iofeph, the ^Madianites and the ifmaelttes were 
confuted, here the Madianites and Amalckites,axe made one Nation. For in the pro- 
fecution of the ftoric of Gedeen, the Madianites only are named, as comprehending c 7. 
both Nations;and in the eight Chaptcr,v.a 4. thefe Nations arc all called Ifmaelttes, 

G and 




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Exod.i. 



Plinl.<i.c.i. 

C.IJ.UJ. 

C.i.v.18. 



Thefir/l < Boo{e oftb efirjlpart Chap.^.^.i^. 

and neither Mmnites nor ^Jmalekites. As when Gedeon defired, thatcuerylnTn 
would giuc h.m thcgolden ear-rings,which they had taken.afterthc viaorieagainft 
ZebahmdZalmanna, K.ngs of^to.amounting to 1700 Ihickles of gold.i; is writ- 
ten: For they had golden care-rmgs, becaufe they were ifntaelites. And thefe ifmaelites 
were a great and valiant Nation, and cuer inacl.onof warre. MamcseL contra 
amies, cy muuu omnium contra eum ; Hit hand (faith G o d of I s „ a e l) /W//* ,««,/? 

tew, though fome writers thinke JfaioK/ to be of the Sobemu. And thefe ifmae- 
lites, which mhab.te chiefly in Cedar , and the Defarts of Sur and ^ M ( f a ithV f - 
fbut) vfc po.fon vpon their arrowes , as the Indians doe. Towards the South-raft 
are the Madiamtes, and cA»//«.- a nd beyond them.towardstheC^of^fo* the 
^Amalehtes; and all are one Nation, and allvfnaW 

Laftly,the.lItranflationof^E ? to^Forc^,i s , a rnongothcrpl a ces ) rnadernoft 
apparent , in the Fccond of Chronicles , in thefe words : So the Lordihrred -up a*a,nst 
e h ok A u, tbeflritofthePhilifitnes^ndtbeArabian^which confinethe Ethiopian , 
oft^rca sitithe Geneua tranflation hath it, jwteA were befides the Ethio- 
pians. Now , how farre it is off betweene the />M/?/»«, and the AW,, or the «^- 
thiofiamsKxy man thatlookethinaMap.may judge. ForthertJ^ an d ^^ 
tew doemixeandjoync with the land ofthec^«,andarediftantfrorn^^. 

^abouttwoandthirtie,orthreeandthirriedegrees,andthereforenottheirnext 30 
Neighbours 5 but a 1 ^ OT ,,and the Vefarts of Sur and />W,are betweene them 
So as this place of the fccond of chronicles, fhould haue beene tranflated in thefe 
words : so the Lordftmedvp againjl Iehoum, the Quits of the Philiftines, andthe^ 
f«biamvkch<onMandberderv^ 

remainethm <douh r (faith S r* vch , vs) W,% M * ***«£*,, /,«*„> 
that Countne,uhichioyneth to Arabia. J 

Now may we thinke is it probabl e> or P offibIe,that^y«cou1d be ignorant of A*. 
lm? No,he knew it.no liuing man fo wel,and therfore would neuer haue named Ge- 
hon for Mltu ,or Nilus for Gehon. Surely if Mofes had meant M^when he named ,0 
Gehon .he would hauecalled the Riuer (into which he was caft vpon reeds, and pre- 3 
ierued by God, working compaffion in the Daughter of pharao J a Riuer of oEc ypt 
wherein hee was borne and bred, and wrought fo many miracles. Befidefthe 
riuer of A,/*, is often named in the Scr.pturcs,but neuer by die nameoF Gehon. And 
if Mo/es had told the ifraelites, that Mm had beene a Riuer of Paradife, they mi £ ht 
juftly haue thought that he had derided them : fonhexhad lined there alfdaicSof 
their hues, and found nofuch WfotaH , nor any memorie,orfpeech thcTeoF- 
except we fliail^elccue the Paradife of Hebrides, where (faith P/mieJ there wasno^ 
th 1 ng found in his time,but wild Oliues in ftead ofgolden apples.But Mm is twice 
called Sconce in Efay, and once in the Prophet Hiaemit 5 and yet in thofe places An 
it is not faidto be a riuer oF^te^,but of ^gypt. For in a word.the Ifraelites had 

nciKranycomunionoraffaires with the^/to^ w ,noranyintelligence,or trade 
beyond v£&pt,to the South ; but the enemies, which they had on the South and' 
Eafl parts, were thefe Nations of the cbufites, Philifiines , ifmaelites, Amalekites ' and 
Mumtes: who beingoften goucined by many little King S ,oriW,,werediftin- 
guilhed in names, according to the Fathers and Heads of thofc Nations- but in one 
gencrall name were all Arabians. On the North fide of Canaan, they were afflifted 
with the Ccelefyrians, with the Magogiam,Tubalines, a nd others theiradhcrcnts • and 
thirdly within themfelues, theNations,whichtem 3 incdofthe a ncientC^^, 
held the ftrongeft Cities vpon the Sea-coaft (as) Tyre,Sidon, Aeon, Gait, and many 5 o 

others: yea, Mm^/«*,tfeJfe was w.th-held from 'fi^ (from the daiesoFcW* 
euen vntothc time of Dauid) by the lebufites. 

■nS^Sf J nowrcma ' n f thof moftdifficultieis, tharirdcth n tappcarc,that 
any partoFG^* watercth that part of Anbk the ftonie, which theC^inhabi- 

tcd 



h^jA,'^ 



C h a p.j.&ty. of the Hiflorie oftbelVorld. 



louh.mfelfemfeekingout W/, : for he was dr.uen (to my vndcrftand ng)t 

tcrc^ and the other /W^, for I Jinde noncftchin™*^, 3ath 
ddmbcd : by wh lc h Riuers hce alfo mcludeth wkhm W/,, cuen ' ^g 

he maketh to foil into the //«//*„«, atc^,, and whofe firings he findSTS 

*o Eaft mA r*bu, u but imaginarie: for the Current by C J K b?t Small ££? 

nfing bctwceneitand the red Sea, whofchead from4^itfelfeis I HrZn T ' 

hatmanyweremifoken -TW^£iMcF^tl^^JSSiSt 

hcywereplanted when theftateofz/^ftood^and when it flourished bemSS 
thar neere neighbours, and neuer looked back to the firft fete and SmS&rf 

H av i l a h tooke thenuer-fideofr/>w chiefly on the Ei'ft wWrl, Xlv 

20 nuer, in the entrance o? Arabia fclix. Nimwd feated him/elfe 1H A 
Valley,wherchebuilt^/, whereof that Region KaSS tl °? he ' 

£?/«»<. Ch v s himfelfe and his brother M ,3 fiS t Z J 1 "^ fr 
lethintotheLakesofcto,,andinp^ 
d,ey drew themieluesmoreWefteSpvtrdS 

M .zoiMpaftoucr into^vw, in whi^nSSfci^T ^ whence 
yearesafter. Now becaufe thS could b SiS^fr^ 
which they might entitle erf*., they SSKS^tttT' 



*3 




^ 



after-ages m eht conclude rfnc c,ww "/"itiamename ot Britannia, 

^"LtfofndX^ 

&fo», that it watered the whole h„H n S I? ? "*'",'" h " defcnpttotiof 

ages they became Lords of marty Nations UK K / f ' ? g ln , aftel '~ 
Maiftersi time, (as the Sarac Jwl £*£ ^cSS^frf 1 ^^™ 1 ^ 
world. For (though the Babylonian EmpZ IS 3 < u ° fa .S rc ? t Pf : ofthe 
thefonne ofCnvXconfiftedatthefiiTbu, off ^ ^^'"N'^od 

^ndedaUthe^hole^^ 

W: MdthcgrcatncffeofthatEmDireSnnl I t thcmme of M?- 

ther off, and in places not yet entituled, Ld fe herTm 'th "L / ? *T ^ 
where the cfcrf* retain/their names S^tt^aSte3ESi• 

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that Chvs or any of his could in haft crecpe through thofe defert Regions, which 
the length of 1 30 yeares after the flood had (as it were) fortified with thickets,and 
permitted cucry bufh and briar, recde and tree to ioyne thcmfelucs (as it were) in- 
•„,to one maine body and Forreft. For if welooke with judgement and rcafon into 
' 'the worlds plantation, we fhall findc,that cucry fiimilie feated thcmfelucs as neere 
together as poffible they could ; and though ncceffitie enforced them, after they 
grew full of people, to fprcad themfelucs, and creepc out oishinar or Babjloma,yet 
did they it with this aduife, as that they might atal times refbrt, and fuccourone 

onntnnv n\7 r'mcr mp fifing nptnn t-1-»*»t-» fin'it-Un-nt- oil ^^i^U#-\ ;.-«««JTM-l_ c_ m _ ... 



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<. another byriuer, the fields being then (without all doubt) impaffable. So N 1 m-Z 
x n.oD,whooutofwitandftrengthvfurpcd dominion ouer the reft, fate downeTn ic> 
the very confluence of all thofe riuers, which watered Paradife : for thither it was 
to which the greateft troupes ofN oahs children repaired ; and from the fame 
place whence Mankindehad his beginning, from thence had they againe their in- 
creafe. The firft Father of men Adam, had therein his former habitation. The fe- • 
cond Father of MankindeN o a h, began from thence his difperfion. 

Now as N 1 m r. o d the yongeft, yet ftrongeft, made his choice of Babel (as afore- 
laid) which both Tigris and Euphrates clcanfed and enriched ; fo did H a v i l a h 
place himfelfe vpon Ptfo-tigris :Raamah and his fonne Sheba farther downe 
vpon the fame riuer, on the Sea-coaft of Arabia : Chvs himfelfe vpon Cebon, the 
faireft branch ot'Euphrates. And when they began |to fpread themfclues farther off, 23 
yet they alwaies faftencd thcmfelucs to the riuers fides : for Ninme,charran,Refeph\ 
Cameb, Vr in Cbaldta,and the other firft-pcopled Cities were all founded vpon thefe 
nauigable riuers,or their branches, by which the one might giue fuccour and affi- 
ftance to the other,as is already often remembred. 



£. XV. 

i^feomlufion by my of repetition offometbingsftofan of 
before. 




3° 



Vt now to conclude this difpute, it appeareth to me by the teftimo- 
p niesofthe Scriptures, that Paradifewns a place created by God, and a 
, part ofthis our earth and habitable world, feated in the lower part of 
( the Region oTEden, afterward called Lsiramftuuiorum, or <J\lefopota- 
• mia, which taketh into it alfo a portion oKshinar and Armenia : this 
Region Handing in the moft excellent temper of all other, (to wit) 3 5 degrees from 
the Aequinocliall, and 5 j from the North pole : in which Climate the moft excel- 
lent wines, ffuites, oyle, graineofall forts are to this day found in abundance And 
there is nothing that better proueth the exccllencie of this fiyd foile and temper 
then theabundant growing ofth e Palme-t rees,without the care and labour of man' 40 
For wherein foeucr the Earth, Nature y an3 the Sunne can moft vaunt that they 
haue excelled, yet fhall this Plant be the greateft wonder ofall their works -this tree 
alone giueth vnto man whatfoeuerhis life beggeth at Natures hand. And though it 
/ may befayd, that thefe trees are found both in theEaft and Weft Indies, which • 
\ Countries are alfo blefTed with a perpetuall Spring and Summer, yet lay downe by 
; thofe pleafures and benefits the fearefull and dangerous thunders and lightnings 
the horrible and frequent Earthquakes, the dangerous difeafes, the multitude of ve- 
nimousbeafts and wormes,with other inconuemences.and then there will be found 
no comparifbn betweene the one and the other. 

What other excellencies this garden of Paradfekid /before God, (formansin- 50 
\ gratitude and crueltie,curfedtheearth) we cannot iudgc; but I may ftfely thinke, 
that by how much ^dam exceeded all liuing men in pcrfection.by being the immc- - 
diatcworkcmanfh.p of God, by fo muchdidthatchofenl^dparticulargardenex- 
ceedeaflpartsof thcyniuerfall world, in which Godhad planted (that is) madeto 

grow 




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C h a r.j.^.if. of the Hijlorie of the World. 



65 



grow the trees, ofLife, of Knowledge- Plants only proper, and 



uiu becommins the 
Paradtje, and Garden or lo great a Lord. 

Thefummeofallthisis, That whereas the eves of menin this Scripture haue 
beene dira^-figSeJXfeme of them rinding Vm-adtfe beyond our knowne world • 
fome, abouc the middle Region of the aire : fome, cleuatedneare the Moone mo- 
thers, as farre South as the Line, orasrarre North, asthePole, &c) I hope that 
the 'Reader will be Efficiently fatisfied', thatthefe were but like Caftles in the aire 
and m mens fancies, va.nely imagined. For it was Laftward in Eden. ( faith iMofes ) 
Laftward mrefpect of aJm, that God planted this garden, which Eden we finde 

10 m the Prophets where it was, and whereof the name (in fome part) remainethto 
9™??- A f Riuerwentoutof Eden to water this garden, and from theWiuided 
it felfe into foure branches 5 and we hnde that both T,gm and Euphmtes fwimmins* 
through £«!■* doe loync m one, and afterward taking wayes apart doe watered 
Aid \Hautkh , according to Mo fes , the true fcatcs of chut and his Sonnes then bant 
in the Valley of Shaw, in which "^mroAhv&xsM. That 1'ifon was Gmves the" 
Scripture , Reafon , and experience teach the contrarie : for that which wis n'cuer 
loyned cannot bcdiuided. Ganges, which inhabiteth Indk, cannot be a branch of 
the R mers of Eden ; That Gehon was agfor , thefame diftance makcth the lame im 
poffibline, and this R.uer is a greater ftrangcr to Tigris ^Euphrates, then Ganges 

so is : foralthough there are betwecne Tigm and Ganges aboue fourethoufand miles 
yetthey both nfem the fame quarter of the world ■ but Mm is begotten in the 
mountaines of the Moone, almoft as farre off as the Cape of good hope, and falleth i£ 

andMethmtothe Gulfyo? Zerfit , the one r.feth in the South, and trauai e h 

grccstheone fromthc other • Inth.sleafe following I haue added a cW^ir^> 
delcriptionofthisterreftnall iW/^that the Readermay thereby the better f 
concciuetheprecedingdifcourfe; an d this is the reward I lookefor > 

that my labours may but recciuc an allowance fufpendedf" 
vntill fuch time as this defcription ofmine 
be rcproued by a 
better, 

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66 The fir/i ( Boo{e ofthe fir/l part Cha p.^.i. 

*- — i — ■- ' — , 1 . : 'b-, , 



Ch 



A P. 



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C' 






Of the Wo chief e Trees in the Garden of 
Taradife. 



10 








p ' = 3 



f > 



$. I. 

lhat the tree of Life was a materiall tree : and in what fenfe it is to be taken, 

that man by his eating the forbidden fiuit , is made fub- 

iect to death. 



O k eating the forbidden fruit of thcTree of Know- 
led ge was ^Adam driuen out of ParadiftLJ , in exilium 
•vita temporalis , into the banifment of temporal! lifes, 
faith Beda. That thefejtrees^of Life and Knowledge 
were materiall trees ( though Figures of the Law and 
oftheGofpell) it is not doubted by the moft religious aa 
and learned writers : although the wits ofnjcn^hich_ . 
areJoyolatile,as nothJn^cajiJixeth^m^j^STolTiijrx-- 
rie, as nothingcan hiTtenthemJiauc in this alfo deliue- 
red to the world an lrnagTnarie doctrine. 

Th e/tree of L ife (fay the Hcbrewes) hath a plurall 
conftruttion, an d is to be vnderftood , Ugnumvitarum , The tree ofliues, becaufe the 
fruit thereof had a propertie, to preferue both the growing, fenfiriue , and rationall 
life of man •> and not only (butfor^^wmanfgreflion) had prolonged his owne 
sart.feit.i-u: dayes, but alfogiuenadureftillcontinuancetoallpofteritie; and that, fb long, as a 
J74- bodiecompoundedofElementscouldlaft. 50 

And although it is hard to thinke , that flefti and bloud could be immortall , bu6S; • 
that it muft once perilh and rot , by the vnehanged law of God impofed on his crea-$ 
turcs, Man (not withftanding) fliould haue enioyed thereby a long, healthfull, and%^ 
vngricued life : after which (according to the opinion of moft Diuincs) he fliould /jf 
haue becnetranflatcd, as Enoch was. And as before the floud , the daics ofmen had ij ; : 
the long meafure of eight hundred ornine hundred ycares^and fboncafter the floud % 
of two hundred yeares and vpwards euen to flue hundred : lb if ^Adam had not dili* 
obeyed Gods firft and eafie Commandemcnt , the liues ofmen on earth might haue \ 
continued double, treble, or quadruple to any ofthe longeft times of the firft age, as ' 
many learned men haue concerned. Chryfoftome, Rupertus,Tofafus,and others were 40 
ofbeliefe, that (but for Adams fill and tranfgreffion) <_^/<z»2 and his pofteritiehad 
beene immortall. Butmchisthcinfinitcwifcdomeof God, as he foreJawthat the 
Earth could not haue contained mankindc ; or elle,that Millions of foules muft haue 
becne vngenerated, and haue had no being, if the firft number, wherewith the Earth 
wasreplenilhed,had abode thereon for cuer : and therefore that ofchryfoHome muft 
be vnderftood ofimmortalitie of bodies, which fliould haue becne translated and 
glorified. ■ 

Bur bf -what ki nde or Species this tree of Life was, no man hath taken on him to 
teach : in which re/peel many haue conceiued, that the lame was not materiall; but a 
meere Allegoric, taking their ftrength out of 'Salomon, where Wifedome is compared 50 
to the Tree of Life , and from other places , where al/b Chris't isTalled the 1 ree of 
rdpstnt.z.j. Life, and'out ofthe ^yfpocalypfis, lwillgiuetohimthatouercommeth,toeateofthcTree 
of life , which u in the Paradife of God. But to this place S*. Augujfines mfwerc may 
fuffice,(whichis) That the one doth not exclude the other, but that, astherewasa 

ter- 












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Cha p.4-^.2. o/>/^ Hijhris of the WorlL 



67 



tcrreitnall Paradife^>, fo there was a cclcftiall. For al though ^g*r and Sara were Fi- 
gures of the old, and Afc jy Tefiament, yet to thinkc that they were not Women , and 
the nv.ideand wifeof ^w/u/K, were mcerc fbolilhncfle. And fo in this place the 
fenfe of the Scripture is manifeft. For God brought out of the earth cuery tree faire to 
fight, and fiveet to tajie^_ the tree alfo of life inthe midft of the garden : which fhewefh, 
that among the trees, which the Earth by Gods commandement produced, the tree 
of Life was one, and that the fruit thereof was alfo to be eaten. The report of this 
i rec was alfo brought to the ancient Poets : for as from thcindigefted matter or 
Chaos, Hefwdus, Homer , Ouid, and others fteale theinuention of the created world ; 
1 o fo from the Garden of Paradtfis, they tooke the Plat-forme of the Orchard of Al- 
cinom, and another of the Hejpend.es : and from the tree ofLife, their Neclar and Am- 
brojk; fortA^/Aw-, according to Suidas,figmh'eth making young, and Ambrofia,im- 
nwtditie ; and therefore faid to be the meate and drinke of the Gods. 



rC 



• ' t< t*h 



a- ; 1 > 



- y v-w^u^x:| 



Ficus Indica. 



O/Becanvs his opinion that the Tree of 'Knowledge was 
7 * 



20 




O w for the Tree of Knowledge of good and euill, fome men haue pre- 
iiimcd hirthcr, efoecially Goropms Bestows, who giueth himfelfe the ho- 
nour to haue found out the kind of this Tree, which none of the Wri- 
ters of former times could euergheffe at, whereat Goropiwmuch mar- 
uaileth. But as he had an inuentiue braine, fo there neucr lined any 
man, that belccued better thereof, and of himfelfe.' Surely howfoeuer his opinion 
may be valued, yet he vfurpcth the praife due to others, at leaft if the inuention be at 
that price at which he fetteth it. For CMgfes Bar-cephas faftencd on this conjecture 
aboueiixe hundred yeares before Becanm was borne: and Bar-ceph.ishimfcWc refer- 
reth the inuention to an antiquitie more remote, citing for his Authour Philoxenm 
30 'f^Limirgenfis , and others, whofevcry wordes Goropittsvfhh, both concerning the 
Tree, and thereafons wherewith he would induce other men to that beliefe For 
J/^^-^/»/; iW inhisTreatifo ofParadife (the firft Part and fol. 49.) faith, That 
the T rce of Knowledge was Ficus Indica , the Indian Fig-tree , of which the greateft 
plentie (fhithBecmusJ arc found vpon the bankes ol Ace fines, one of the Riuers 
which ialleth into Indus, where ^Alexander built his Fleet of Gallies in , orneare the 
Kingdome of Porus. 

ThisTrecbcarethafruitofthebignefreofagreatpeazc,or(asP/?»/>reporteth) p& /.„ „, 
lomewhat biggcr,andthatitisatree fe femper Jerens,alwaies planting it felfe; that it 
ipreadeth it felfe lo farre abroade, as that a troupe of horlemen may hide thcmfelues 

40 vnder it. Strabo faith, that it hath branches bending downewards, and lcaues no lefle Omm! 
then a Ihield. AriphAm affirmcth that fiftie horfemen may ffiadow thcmfelues vn- 
der one of thefe trees. Onefierkustw&xh this number to foure hundred. This tree 
Uaith Theophraftm) execcdeth all other in bigneffe , which alfo time and Oneficntus 
connrme : to the truncke of which thefe Authours giuc fuch a magnitude as I "jfhamc 
to repcatc. But it may be, they all fpeake by an ill-vnderftood report. For this in- 
<O wFi g -tree is not fo rare a Plant, vis Becanm conceiueth, who becaufo he found itno 
■ w " ere cI ^> would needes draw the garden ofParadifeto the Tree , and fet it by the 
nucrA.;e/mcs. But many parts of the world haue them , and I my felfe haue feene 
twentie thoufind of them in one Valley, not farre from Panam Amend They 

jo grow in moift grounds, and in thismanner.Aftertheyare firft fliotvp fome twentie 
or thirtie foote in length, (fome more, fome lefle, according to the folic) they fprcad 
a very large toppe hauing no bough nor twigge in the truncke or ftemme : for from 
thevtmoftendo tnehcadbranchesthereilTuethouta gummieiuyce, which hari- 
getndowneward like a cord or finnew, and within a few Moneths reaeheth the 

ground ; 



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ground 5 which it no fooncr toucheth but it taketh roote, and then being filled both 
from the toppe boughes, and from his ovvne proper roote, this cordemaketh it fclfe 
a Tree exceeding haftily. From the vtmoft boughes of thefe young trees there fall 
againe the like cordes, which in one yeare and leiTc (in that world of a pcrpetuall 
fpring) become alfo trees of the bigneffe of the nether part ofa launcc,and as ftraight, 
as art of nature can make any thing, Gifting fuch a fhade , and making fuch a kindc of 
groue , as no other Tree in the world can doc. Now one of thefe trees confidered 
with all his young ones may (indcede) fhrowde foure hundred or foure thoufand 
horfemen, if they pleafe ; for they couer whole vallies ofground where thefe Trees 
grow neare the Sea-banke, as they doe by thousands in the inner part of Trmidado. 10 
Thecordes which fill downe ouer the bankes into the Sea , (hooting alway downe- 
^j^ird to findc roote vndcr water, are in thofe Seas of the Indies ^hctc Oifters breed, 
untangled in their beddes, fo as by pulling vp one of thefe cordes out ofthe Sea, I 
haue feencfiue hundred Oyfters hanging in a heape thereon ; whereof the repo're 
came, that Oyfters grew on trees in India, But that they beare any fuch huge leaues, 
or any fuch delicate fruit I could neucr iTr.de , and yet I haue trauailed a dozen miles 
together vnder them : but to rcturne to Goropius Becanus. This tree ( faith he ) was 
good for mcate and plcafing to the fight, as the tree of Knowledge of good and euill 
isdefcribedtobe. 

Secondly, this tree hauing fo huge a truncke (as the former Authours report, and 20 
Becanus beleeueth) it was in this tree that Adam and Ene hidde themfelues from the 
prefence ofGod, for no other tree (faith he) could containe them. But firft it is cer- 
taine, that this Tree hath no extraordinarie magnitude, as touching the trunke or 
ftemme, for among ten thoufand of them it is hard to finde any one bigger then the 
reft, and thefe arc all but ofa meane fize. Secondly , the wordes of Mofes tranflatcd 
inmedioligni, are byall the interpreters vnderftood in the plurall number, (that is) 
in the middefi ofthe trees. But hi j th ird argument (or rather the argument of Ultofes 
Bar-cephas, word for word) is, that when Adam and £«*found themfelues naked, 
they made them breeches of Fig-lcaues; which proueth (indecde) that either the 
tree it felfe was a Fig-tree,or that a Fig-tree grew neare it : becaufe Adam being pofleft a 6 
with (hame did not runne vp and downe the garden to feeke out leaues to couerhim ' 
but found them in the place it felfe ; and thefe leaues of all other were moil commo- 
dious by reafon of their largenefle, which Plime auoweth in thefe wordes; Latitudo 
foliorum pelt a effigiem Amazonia habet , The breadth ofthe leaues hath thefhafe of an ^A- 
maz,onian field : which alfo Theophrast confirmeth; the forme of which Targets 
Virgil touchith: 

Buck ^sfmazonidum lunatis agtnimpeltis 
PenthefiUa fur ens. 

The Amazons with Crefcent-fbrmed fhield 
Penthefika leades into the field. 

HereS^»«.fdefirethtobebeleeued, or rather threatnethvs all that reade him, 
to giue credit to this his borrowed difcouerie, vfing this confident ( or rather chole- 
ricke) fpeech. Quiserittamimpudcntcr obftinatus , ft htcanobis de ficu hac ex antiquif 
fcriptonbus cum Mosis narratione comparet , vt audeat dicer e aliam arboreminueniri 
pojfe.qu&cumillamagkquadret, Who willbe fo impudently obftina-te, if he compare thefe 
thtnges which we haue reportedofthk Fig-tree , and out of ancient Writers deliuered, with 
thcndrrationofM o s e s, as todarctoauow, that any other tree can be found, whichdoth ? * J 
more properly anfwere,or agree therewith. Butformyfelfe,becaufe'lneitherfindthis 
tree, forting 1 n body, in largencffe ofleaues, nor in fruit to this report,I rather incline 
to theopinion of Phdo , That the Earth neuer brought forth any of thefe trees nei- 
ther betorcnor after; but Ileaueeuerymantohisownebelccfe, forthematterisof 

110 







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C h a p.^.j.^. of the HifiorieoftbeJVorld. 

no great weight as touching his kinde : only thereby , and by the eaiic Commando- 

ment by God giuen to ^Aiam, to forbeare to feede thereon, it plcafed God to make 

triall of his obedience: Prohibita, Hon propter almd, quam adcommendandmn purd ac Ai, v ,ji dechtit. 

fimplicis obedient'ubomm^ Being forbidden, notfor any other reJpecJ,then thereby to com- De;.Aij,c.jo 4 

mend the goodneffe of pure andfimple obedience. 



. • -gMrrti^rt^iVT 



10 



\. III. 

O/Becanvs his not vmvittie allegorizing of the Stone of his Ficus Indica. 




Vt in this I ravi&doc Becamis right, that he hath very wittily allegori- 
zed this tree , allowing his fuppofition of the Tree ltfelfe to be true. 
The effects whereof,becaufe his diftour/cs are exceeding ample, I haue 
gathered in thefi few wordes. As this Tree (faith he) fb did Man 
grow ftraight and vpright towards God , vntill fuch time as hee had' 
tranfgrcfTed and broken the Commandement of his Creatour; and then likevnto 
the boughes of this tree , hebeganne to bend downcward , and ftouped toward the 
earth, which all the reft of Adams pofteritie after him haue done , rooting themfelues 
therein, and faftning themfelues to this corrupt world. The exceeding vmbragiouf- 
ao neffe of this tree he compareth to the darke and fliadowed life of man , through 
which the Sunne of iuftice being not able to pierce, wehaue all remained in the fha- 
dow of death, till it plcafed cfov//toclimbc the treeoftheCrofle forourcnlight- 
ning and redemption. The littTcTruit which it bearcth, and which is hard to linde 
among fb many large leaues, may be compared (faith he) to the little vcrtue, and 
vnperceiued knowledge among fo large vanities, which obfeure and fhadow it oucr. 
And as this fruit is exceeding fweet, and delicate to the tafteand palate, fb are the de- 
lights and pleafures of the world, moftplcafing while they dure. But as all tho fe 
thinges which are moft mellifluous, are fboncft changed jnto ch oller and bit terneff c: 
• ib are our vanities a nd pleafures conucrted 'into the bittcreft fbrro wes and repe n- 
30 tanccs7 ' 1 hat the leaues arelb exceeding large, the fruit (for fuch leaues) exceeding 
little, in this, by comparifon we behold (faith he) the many cares and great labours 
ofworldlymen,theirfollicitude,their outward fhewes,and publike oftentation,thcir 
apparent pride and large vanities ; and if we fceke for the fruit , which ought to be 
theirvertuousandpiousaaions,wefinditofthebignefrcofthefiTialleftpeaze;glo^ 
rie, to all the world apparent; goodneffe, to all the world inuifiblc. And further- 
more, as the leaues , bodie, and boughes of this tree, byfo much exceede all other 
Plants, as the greateft men of power and worldly abilitiefui-paffe the meaneft : fo is 
the little ff uit of fuch men, and fuch trees,rather fitting and becomming the vnwor- 
thieft fhrubbe, and humblcft biyar, or the pooreft and baf eft man , then fuch a flou- 
40 rifhing ftatelineffe, and magnitude. Laffly , whereas Adam , after he had difobayed 
God, and beheld his owne nakedneffe and ihame, fought for leaues tocouerhinv 
felfewithall,thismayferuetoputvs inmindcofhis andourfinnes, as often as we ") 
put on our garments, tjKouerand ador ne our rotten and mo rtaUbodies : to pamper C 
' ^a taaintaine which wee vfelomrryvndiarit ahjejin d cruell praetife ' hi this wot U. ( 

$. IIII. 

Oft he name of the tree of Knowledge of good and euill: with feme other notes touching 
the Storie of K dams finne. 

! Ow, as touching the fenfe ofthis tree of Knowledge of good and euill, 

, and what operation the fruit thereof had, and as touching the propcr- 

j| I tie of the Tree it felfe, OMofes Bar-ceph.ts an ancient Syrian Doctor 

k jj (tranflatedby Mafms) giueththisiudgement : That the fruit ofthis 

^ tree had no fuch vertue or qualitie, as that by the tailing thereof there 

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ii. 
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C.1S.14. 



was any fiich knowledge created in ^Jdam, as iflie had beenc ignorant before 5 but 
as Imiuf alfonoteth, Arbor fcicntu boni &mali (id eft) exferientu boni&mdiabeuen- 
tu, The Tree of Knowledge of good and euill (that is) the exfenence of good and e rill by the c- 
ttent. For thus much we may conceiue , that Adam being made ( according to the ■ 
Hebrew phrafe) by the workemanfhip ofGodsowne hand, in greater perfection 
then eucr any man was produced by generation, being (as it were) the created plant, 
outorwhofefecdeallmenliuinghauegrownevp; andhauing receiued immortali- 
tiefromthebrcathorfpiritofGod,hccouldnot (for thefe refpedts) be ignorant, 
that the difbbaying of Gods commandement was the f earfulleft euill,and the obfer- 
uatioiofhis precepts the happieft good- But as men in perfect health -doe (not- 10 
witaftanding) conceiue, thatfickneffcisgrieuous, and yet in no liich degree of tor- 
ment, as by the fuffering and experience in themfelues thqy afterwards witnefle r S3 
was it with Adam, who could not be ignorant ofthe puniihments,due to neglect and 
difbbedience ; and yet felt by the proofe thereof in himlelfe another terrour then he . 
had forethought, or could imagine. For looking into theglafle of his owneguiltie 
ibule, he beheld therein the horrour of Gods iudgements, fo as he then knew, he fee- 
lingly knew, and had triall ofthe late gooa\ which could not be prized, and of the 
new purchaled euill, which could not be expreft. He then law himfelfe naked both 
in bodie and minde ; that is, depriued of Gods grace and former felicitie : and there- 
fore was this tree called the tree of Knowledgc,and not becaufe the fruit thereof had %& 
any liich operation, by any fclfe qualitie or effect: for the fame phrafe is vfed in many 
places of the Scriptures, and names are giuen to Signes and Sacraments, as to acts 
performed, and thinges done. In fiich fort as this tree was called the tree of Know- 
ledge, by came ofthe euent (as is aforefaid) fo was the Well of contention therefore 
called Efek, and the Well of hatred J//#^,becauIe the Heardfmen of ifaac and Gerar 
contended for them ; and thcheape of ftones, called the heape of witneffe,betweenc 
Jacob and Laban, not that the ftones bare witneffc,but for a memorie ofthe couenanr. 
So Jacob called thehoufc of God Bethel: and Bagar, the Well in the Defart , ViueMis, 
& ■videntis. 

But <^Adam being both betrayed and maiftered by his affections > ambitious of a 36 \ 
farther knowledge then he had pcrceitfed in himfelfe,and looking but nightly (as all 
his ilfucs doe) into the miferks and ibrrowes incident , and greatly affecting the liip- 
pofed glorie which he might obtainc by tailing the fruit forbidden, he was tranfoor- 
ted and blowne forward by the gentle windc of pleating pcrlwafions vnawares ; his 
progreffion being ftrengthencd by the fubtile arguments of Sathan,v/ho laboured to 
poylbn mankinde in the very roote , which he moiftned with the liquor ofthe fame 
ambition, by which himfelfe perilhed fbr^uer. 

B*rt.fem.i.u.' But what meanes did the Dcuill linde out, or what inftruments did his owne fub- 
tletie prelcnt him, as fitteft and apteft to worke this mifchiefe by ? euen the vnquiet 
vanitie of the-woman; fo as by Cddams hearkening to the voice ofhis wifc,contrarie ±6 
to the expreffe commandement ofthe liuing God, Mankind by that her incantation 
became thefubiect of labour, Ibrrow,and death: th eAvoman be ing giu en to ma n for 

tf<«-j. 17. a comforter and companion, but not for a Counfellour. Butlecaufe thou hatfobayed 

thevoiccofthywif<L~>>&c. (laid God himfelfe) Cur fed k the earth for thy fake , infor- 

rowftjaltthoueateofitallthyliftLj. It is alio to be noted, by whom the woman was 

> pw*" tempted ; euen by the raoft vgley and vrrworthy of all bcafts, into whom the Dcuill 

• r*-"* JlL f T2rf>econdly, what was the motiue of her dilpbedience : euen a defire to know what 1 ' 

was moft vnfitting her knowledge, an affection which hath euer fince remained in all Y 
thepoftentieofherSexe. Thirdly, what was it thatmouedthe mantoyeeldto 50 
herperfwafions ? euen the fame cauie which hath moued all men fince to the like 
confeht, namely an vnwillingneffe to grieueher and make her fadde.leaft foe fhould 
pine and be ouercome with forrow. But if Adam in the ftate ofperfedtion , and Sa- 
lomon the foiine ofDarid Gods chofen fcruant, and himfelfe a man endued with the 

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C h a F#£j. <?/>^ /fyfyr/V o/^ World, 

gre a tcftwif e domc,didbothofthcmdirobaythdrCrc a rour,bythepcrfvvanon' i nd 
for the loue they bare to a woman, it is not Co wonderfull a 5 lamentable that other 

men infuccced.ng ages hauebcene allured tofo many inconuement and 'wicked pra- 

ftifesby theperfwalionsofthdrwiues, or other beloued Darlings, who couer ouer 

andmadowmanymahciouspurpofeswithacounterraitpaffionofdiffimuhtefor-. 
row and vnquietnefle. 



C H A P. V. 

Of diners memorable things betvpeene the fall of 
Adam, and the floud of 
Noah. 



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Of the caufe and the reuenge ofC a i n sfinne .- and of his $M 
from God. " ■ 



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He rime prid^andimibit^n which begannein An- 
gcls,and afterward poMFC-fdam, Cain alio inherited- 
iorcam (enuiousof the acceptation of his brothers 
prayer and fknfice) flew him, making h.rnfelfe the 
hrlt man-flayer , and hisjbj^therjhe firit Martyr • the 
reuenge of which vnnaTuTaTHuTtTieFr although ic 
pleafcd God tomkigate, when Cam cryed out that his 
punilhment was greater then he could benrerTor the 
iamc offence chiefly (wherewith the ibnnes of Adam, 
as it were, vrged and prouoked God) hedeftroyed all 
rh? r,rtl, ir *. ? ™ ankmde » l>"t T^oah and his familie : forit is written 

CS^ l »wM>wqA, Thegoingoiit of CW.fi-omthcprt ' 






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72 ( Tkefirft c Bookeoftbefirfipart Chap.j.S.2. 1 

cJb <?°3 o/C A 1 ns dwelling in the land <?/N o d : and of his Cittie Enoch. 

fe&^Sgg His word N[o dor NaidS*; Hierome and many others vnderftand to fig- 
nific wandring, or incertaine habitation : vexation or agitation , iaith 
Iunius; but the Seucntie conuert it otherwiic, and take Nod for the 
proper name of a Countrie , and ib doth Iofephus. But it icemeth to 
me, that Cain was rather a vagabond or wandererin his cogitations, 
then anything elfe, and that his thoughts and confcience had no quiet or reft, in re- io 
sard of the murther committed,iuft!y fearing (by his dwne words) the like violence; 
6m. 4. 14. ^Andwhofoeuerfindeth me (faith Cain) Jhaltflay me'. Now that i(o d or Mid was a 
Region wherein Cain inhabited, appeareth by the word (dwelt) for dwelling figni- 
fieth an abiding : and wecall thole people wanderers and vagabonds that haus no 
Gm-4- **• dwelling place. And to make this dwelling and abiding more manifeft, Mofes teach- 
eth in what part of the earth this his'habitation was, which he affirmeth toward s the 
Eaft fide of Eden. Secondly , it is faicl' by dwfef, that after Cain departed from the 
17. prefence or fauour of God , he built a Cittie , and called it by the name of his firft 

1 - / borne, Enoch ; which flic weth that he feared to wandcr,and rather fought tofortilie 
' himielfeagainftreuenge. C^r/fc faith, that Cain and ^yibel were figures of chrilt 20 . 
and ofthe lewes \ and that as Cain, after that he had flaine Abel vniuftly, had thence- 
forth no certaine abiding in the world : (b the lewes , after they had crucified the 
v~*-l Sonne of God, became Runncgates : and it is true,that the Inveshwd neucr fince any 

j- — 7 certaine Eftate, Commonwcale, orPrinceofthcirownevpontheearth. Nowthis 

V land of Nod-, Iunms takcth to be in \_Arabia Deferta, a Region of Nomades ; but Ara- 
bia the Defert is not Eaftward, or on the Eaft part of Eden, neither are theie Nomades 
any particular people or Nation. For all theie, in what part of the world foeuer, 
which in old time liued by paftorage, andfeddc (aswecallitin/rdW,)vponwhite ■ V 
meate without tilling ofthe ground , arc called by the Greckes Nomades , and by the 
hstinesPaftoresvagi, as the Northern Tartarians, the Getulians , and Njimidians in 30' 
, ^Africa, the ancient Bnttans , and the Northern Irifi : yea fiich were the inhabitants . X 
,- gi of I talie it felfe, till fuch time as italits ( who gaue them that name ) taught them the 
hufbandrie of tillage vied at this day. But the Region Eaftward from Eden is that 
part of Affyria, called by Ptolomie, Catena, which alio might be deriued of Carena,xhc 
Countrie of Cain. And that Cain inhabited in thole parts it may be gathered by the 
T. *;• fi^ poflefflon of his Father L/idam ; for thus it is written Gen. 3 . Therefore the Lord 

God fent him forth fom the garden of Eden to tilltheeajth whence he was taken : and in the • 
*4. Vcrie following : Thus he cast outman,&c. andat theEafl fde of the garden of Eden he 

fet the Chernbins : which ftieweth that the entrie into Paradife was from the Eaft , by 
which entrance Adam was caft out, and therefore inhabiting on that fide of Paradife a 
which was Eaftward, accordingtotheTcxt.cW»alfoin the fame Region ibughthis 
dwelling place. Now, ifthe word Nodot Naiddoc fignifie profugiis , that is , a fugi- 
tiue, wee can giue no longer time to this vncertaine habitation of Cain , then till hee 
S built the Cittie of Enoch, the firft ofthe worl d, which he inclofed either for his owne 
I defence, or (as Iofephus writeth) to oppreffe others thereby. So as for mine owne o- 
pinion I am rciblucd with the Septuagmt.fbUt ivWwas the proper name ofa Region; 
and for the word (vagabond) which Cainvfczh of himfelfe, itieemethby the per- 
t / clofeofthefame Verfe, that (vagabond) is therein vnderftood for fuch an one as rra- 
l: '4 1 uailcth in'feare ofreuengement -.for yhofoeucr findeth me (faith C a i n) (lull Pay me • 
■{■ orche (vagabond) istakenfor a man without protection, and caft out from the fa- 



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And becauft theie Henochians, fo called ofthe Cittie Henoch, were the firft ibcietie 
and ciuillaflemblie of all other, it is likely that the fame of theie people (either for 
^rueltie, ftrcngth, or other actions) liued in the memoric of Noah and his fonnes ; ib 

that 



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. (JISTTI- 



Chap.^'.i. of the Htflorie of the World. 



73 



H. 

ltk '*tht 

**!«* 

«%figli 

•%&tat, 
'owds tie 
tffonuie 
eof hisfirft 

wafottifie 
msofctey 
had thence- 
ruciiied the 
ffSDceam 
Now this 
\butJn- 

jrldfoeucr, 

vpon white 

, and by the 

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ihttkmk 

Eh is that 

fa«w,thc 

icrcdbythe 

"ttttktLd 

i:andinthe 



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6r bis.o# 

■*# 

in op .. 



frfrj ; 



QuolidiealiqiU 

tnbuc magjto oy~ 

bemutaturjimtn 

vtbiitm fimdz- 

mmta'laciunlur, 

nana Gentium 

nomiaa (" ertrd- 

Etu twm-mbns 

priaribus oriun~ 

tvr. Seneca net 

Albh'itm. 

* Tlui.l.6,c,ti 

\i.& 16. 

31el.I.l.c.vtt. 

Slrnbri.l.11. 

rat.FUce.l.fi. 

Lucan.l.l.v.tff 



that after the floud (as there were ofall forts of natures, Come vertuoufly, fomeim- 
piOHflv dapoied, and: enery active, minde fetting before it whom to follow or imi^ ■,, 
rate) tho/e people j which delighted in crueltie and oppreffion tooke on diem their 

• names whole natures they molt liked and allowed ; of whom thefe Hcmchians were 

not thefeaft. Perchance the placeit felfe where Henochilood before the floud , and 

whereofthe monuments might remaine (as the pillars or the foundation of topper 

did)gaue occafion to the planters of that place to call themfelues by the fame names; 

for of thofe Henochians there were many Nations in the borders oi'Pontus , and Col- 

cbti'm Iberia, Segdiana, and Bactria, and of the fame name many mountaines.as thofe 

f o which are otherwife called Coraxici. And feeing that it is hard to findc out the truth 

. of thefe things, which the molt aged time hath couered oucr or defaced , wee may 

J -7f ^{according to the counfaile of Plato) exceedingly reioyce, and therewith fatisfie our 

aA ■ go fclucs > if of fo great and almoft worne-out antiquitic, if of the cldcft peoples names 

-'. 4.1ft ' anc ^ nations there rcmaineany print or footefleps to pofteriric. 

In * Plime, P.CMela, Strabo , Valerius Flaccus'., Lucan, Stephanas, we finde thofe 
Henochei defcribed, though diuerfly written, as in P/«w,f6metimes Henmhi,m Mela 
Eniochi, in Flaccus Henwchi, in litem Enochu',a\l which inhabite vpon the SezEuxmus, 
tut yet none of thefe are on the Eaft fide of Eden,or (according to Mofes words)Eaft- 
ward from £*&■#. For Mofes, in all places where he defcribeth any Region, wasib 
?o exceeding prccife, asfomctime he vfeth the word Eaft or South without borrow- 
ing or addition, at other times with a borrowing, as Eafhvard or Southward , or to- 
wards the Eaft or South. In the place of Genefo the eleuenth he writeth the word 
{Eaft) fimply and directly. Andas they went from the East , they found a Pimm in the 
landofshmar, but in this of Cain he addeth the word (towards) as, in the land 'of Nod 
towards the East fide of Eden ; which may be taken, as inclining fbme one point or two 
either to the North or to the South, of the Eaft. 

But as we may conjecture that thefe Nations tooke name of Henoch, the Cittie of 

Cain, or of the Region wherein it flood, when the fame was repeopled after the 

floud : fo it is probable that thefe Henochij ofColchis.,md other parts adioyning, were 

; ^~ - 3 o not the firft ofthat name, after the fbnnes of Noah beganne to fill the world againc : 

/_ becaufe, had this Henoch the Cittie of Cain flood in any of thefe parts , it had then 

becne feated North, and not Eaft or Eaftward from Eden. But as Plinie tindeth their 

. habitation towards Pontits, fo afterwards he gocth on Eaftward , till he tracke them 

or trace them out to their originall. For he calleth thefe of Colchis (now Mengrelia ) v\i n /g c t < 
SanniHemochi; Ptolomie Zani; beyond which an hundred and fiftie mile Eaftward ■PMjab.Ajil* 
hefindeth another Nation ofthem about Iberia and Albania; and beyond thefe a- 
gainc he difcouereth a third Nation, from whence all the reft tooke beginning, 
which inhabited on the Weft fide of the mountaincs of Paro-panif us, between them 
and the great riuerofoxw, which bordereths^ra on the North fide ; and thefe 
40 Henochij are due Eaft from the Region of Eden, and Eaftward from the very garden 
it felfe. J 

And although we cannot be allured , that thefe Henochij tooke name from the 
memorie of the Cittie of Enoch directly , yet becaufe they inhabited due Eaft from 
Paradife, and afterwards fprcd themfelues Weft ward (as all Noahs fonnes did that 
came into Shinar) the conjecture is farremore probable, then that of Annius the 
Fryar, who fcts Henoch in Phoenicia, quite contrarie to Mofes word : Phcenim from all 
parts of Eden being directly Weft. 

And befides thefe feucrall Nations ofthe Henochij, stephanus findeth a Region cat- Stefi.<Up f p 
led Henochia,md the fame alfo in the Eaft, with diuers mountaincs about Bactria and 
jo J^/^ofthefamename. Only the Grecians (according to their fabulous inucn- 
tions of all things elfc) out ofthe word (Heniochi) which fignificth Carts or Coach- 
men, make thefe Nations to haue fprung from the Waggoners of Castor and Po/tux 



/-•'I 



'iwinto 






(.to wit) AmphitesmdTclchws, who attended them in the cnterprife o? laior, 
Colchis. And though I doc not denie , but that lafon with other Grcckes ranged the 

H coaftcs 



Tfjtt, Comes ca!. 
.'etlithemsfce- 

Cas. 

NatJCm.lS.CA 



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Thefir/l "Booke of the firft part Cha p.5.^.3. 



i}4 



coaftcs of Afu, the lefle, in an open Boatc or kinde of fmall Galley, * of whom I ffaall 
/ * ' 'in' the' fe- fpeake in his ownc time : yet no man doubteth but that the tale of the golden Fleece 
' Zfc'*f was for the moft part Poeticall ; and withall that in fiich-an open Boate, which could 
' hardly carry their owne Rowers, being fourc and fiftie, there was no place and lefle 
vfe of Coach-horfes or Waggoners. 



trabuMi 



Cap.ij.J.s. 



*3 f* 



e 






*» 



4-) 



ȣjnpe. 



6«4-17. 



c.e.v.s. 



10 




o/MosEsfc omitting fundry things concerning Cains generation. 

Vt of the remembrance and teftimonies of the name of theCittieof 
Henoch in prophaneftorie, thus much may fuffice; Now it followcth 
to anfwerelbme few obiections againlt certaine particulars in the 
fourth and fifth Chapter of Genefis : againft which for the firft it is de- 
manded, how it was poffible for Oi/»(hauing no other affiftancc then 
his fonne Henoch) to performefuch a worke as the building of a Cittie , feeing there 
is thereto requiredfb many hands,andfbgreatamafleof all forts ofMaterials I To> 
which it is anfwered, that we are firft to confider, That of Cain ( becaufehe was the 
Parent of an impious race) Ubfofcs vfeth no ample declaration ; and ib it beft agreeth 
with his diuinereafcn, feeing that he containeth the whole ftorie of the firft race, 2 o 
which wafted by the leaft account i6%6. yeares , in fiue I hor t Chapters. Y et thus 
much mayeueryman borrow of his owne weakeft reafon , That feeing it pleafed 
God to beftow on the firft generations of mens Hues ib long a meafiire, as Soo. and 
poo. yeares , that in fuch a fpace Cain had not want of lcafure and meanes to build 
many fuch Citties as Henoch , be the capacitie anfwering to what other of the world 
fbeuer: for in what age of CVckf lifchc built it, the Scriptures are filent : as of whofe 
times, and the times of his iflues LMofes had the leaft care. And as it was faid of Cain, 
thathebuiltaCirtie:fbwas it faid of Noah, that his three fbnnes peopled all the 
world; butinboththcproccflc of timerequired to bevnderftood : which aduife 
feeing Cvlofes vfeth where the fpace lefle requireth it, as knowing that hee writ the ?o 
Scriptures to reafbnable men, we may eafily vnderftand , that fuch was his meaning 
alfb in all reports of like nature. Forinmakingbut a difference betweene the birth 
of Abel, and oblation of Cain, he fpake it in this fort, Fuit autem pott diesmultos or a 
fne iierum (that is)' in proceflc of time ;/ came to paffe that Cain brought an oblation. 
And therefore it is in like fort to be vndcrftood of Cain, that many yeares fore-gone, 
and when his people were increafed he built the Cittie of Enoch or Henoch. 

And where it is written, as of Cain, that he built Enoch, fo ofSalomon,tha.thcbu\lt 
thcTcmyle of Hierufalem; yctitis wellknowne of Salomon, that he employed in 
that worke i y oooo. labourers : for this phrafe or fpeech is common with our felues 
tofay,ThcKinginuadpd; when he caufed an inuaiiontobemade : and he built, 40 
when he commanded fuch a building. And therefore feeing we finde , that cMofes 
had no regard to the ages, to the birth, or to the death of any of Cains iflues, it is not 
to be maruailed at, why he alfo pafleth ouer in a word the building of Enoch, without 
addition of any circumftance ; for of Cain , UWofes writcth in this manner .- Cain 
alfo knew his wife, who concerned andbarc Henoch, and he built a Cittie, and called the 
name, of the Cittie after the name of his forme Henoch. <^ylnd ^Henoch was 
borne I k. a d , and I k a d begat Mehviaei, and Mbhviael begat Mbthv- 
sML,and Met h v s a e l L a m e c h. 

Now of Seth, CMofes writeth farrc otherwifc, and in this manner. ^Jnd S e t h 
lined 105. yeares, and begat Enoch, and Seth liued after he begat Enoch 807. 
yeares, and begat Sonnes and Daughters :fo as all the dales of Sit h were p 1 1 . yeares, 
and he died: as fcr the yeares and times of the wicked they were not numbred in libra 
■vittentium, faith Cyril. But in Seth was the Church of God eftabliihed , from whom 
Christ defcended, as touching his manhood : and therefore this way and worke Mo- 
pi 



5° 



0* 









i.» 



0/22, 

theiratf " 

lit:.:'-" '- 

■%:■■■ ■ 



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iSan 

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icece 



C h A p.5.^.4.. of the Hijlorie of the IV or Id. 



75 



/« walked in,andfinifhedkwithcarf, paffingouer the reprobate generation (asa- 
fbrefaid.) Ofthelineofo^«w by Cdn,<JMofes remembreth but eight generati- 
ons reckoning <^dam for one, and of the line oi'i_Adam by Seth ten, counting Adam 
alio' therein, as fblloweth : 



I. 



Ad 



A M. 



10 



Cain. 

Henoch. 

frad. 

CAtahuiael. 
<Jlfathtifael. 



j. Lamech, who by <^fda had 

8. Iuhd and Tubd, and by Silk 

Tubalcain, and N&ema. 



V 
4- 
5- 
6. 

7- 
8. 

9- 

10 



Seth. 

Enoflj. 

Cainan. 

Olfahaleel. 

farad. 

Henoch. 

Lftfathufdem. 

Lamech , and 

Noah. 



I 



fc/' 



Thefe be the generations of Adam by Cain , which the Scriptures mention : but 
fofephus giueth vnto Zaw^/j three Icore and feuenteene Sonnes and Daughters , by 
hts two wiucs l^ida, m&SiBa : and to thele three fonnes of 'Lantech, CHoJes afcribeth 
20 thcinuentionofPaftorage,of Muficke, and the working in mettall; for it feemcth 
that Jubd firft gathered together , and made familiar thofe beafts which formerly 
were vntamed, and broughtthemintoheardsanddroues : 7«WinucntedMulkkc, Go?.4,io.n.i$ f ' 
• and Tubalcain the working in braiTc and yron : the one being addicted to hulbandneo 
the other was Mechanicall , the third giuen to idlencfle and pleafnre. In whom be- 
gannethefethreemeanerdegreesofShecp-heards,handy-craks-men,andMufitians. ' 
And in the iflues diSeth beganne the feruicesof God, DiuinitieJProphecie } .and A- 
flrono mic:t hc children of the onelx&ld the Heaucns, the other tBeTiarth. 



|-Ss> 



■*•*? 






,rtf, 




$. mi. 

of the diaerfttiesm the ages of the Patriarchs when they begat their children. 

Second Icruple hath beene made, How it came to pane that the Pa- 
triarchs'hegat their children at fb diucrs ages , as Cainan or Cman&k* 

uentieycarcs,C/l/i/Wff/and Enoch at three Icore and liue yea res, where-, 
as lared begat not any of his vntill he was 1 62. yeares old : Mathufalem 
begatat 187. Lamech at iSa. and Nvah at 500. yeares. Now this 
difference hath becne the more enforced , becaufe it cannot be conieif urcd, that ei- 
ther fared, CMathufalemjx Lamech abftained from marriage out of the religion ofab- 
40 ftincnce, feeing that Enoch, who was tranflated by God for his Angular fanctities, be-i 
gat children before he was three Icore and ten yeares old. 

T he apparent difference hereof arifeth in this , that Mofes d id not number the ge- 
nerations before the floud precilely, according to the firft begotten and eld eft fonnes 
ofthe Patriarchs, but he drew downe the line oiNoah from Se.'h,wd afterward front 
Noah to Abraham, by their trueAnccftors were they elder or younger as he found 
themrfor it is likely that Henoch was not the eldcft ofeW,nor Lamech the firft borne 
of 'Mathufalem, nor Noah of 'Lamech j neither is there any thing kuowne to the contra- 
rie,but that Noah might haue had many fonnes before shem,Ham.^n& £zpfe,thought 
thele three were only named, and furuiuing , and which by God were referued to be 
5 the Fathers of mankinde after the floud ; and therefore when we finde Mahdeeho be 
begotten by Kenan at three fcore and ten yeares who was the firft Ibnne of Kenart,m\ 
then reckon that Mathufalem begat Lamech in the 1 8 7. yeare of his life, the difference 
feemcth ftrange, where Lamech is taken for the eldcft. But Mofes reiccf cth all the o- 
thcr fonnes of 'Mathufalem but Lamech only , becaufe he was the Father oi'Noah as a- 

H 2 . forcfaid. 



8 £=S 



a,Mw 



7 6 



Mal'i.i.l, 



IJjf«gJ 2. 



The fir ft < Boo{e of the fir fl part Chap . 5.5.5. 



•fbrcfaid. Of this S t .Augufine hath ibmcwhat clfc in his ao. and 11. Chapters, 
Di? Ciiiitate Dei. 

But as J*y« counted the generations of the firft age, and Co to ^Abraham , and the 
children of thepromife after him,fb doth $*. Matthew recite the Genealogie of Chrifi, 
not by the eldcit fonnes, but from thofe whom God had chofen and blcffcd, without 
refpeft of the firft borne, who haue hereby the prerogatiue in Eftates, worldlyand 
tranfitorieonly ; and therefore the Euangelist nameth ifaac, and not ijmael, though 
Jjmael werefirftintime.-fbdothhetake Iacob the younger, and not Efau the elder; 
neither is Christ deriued from any of the three eldeft Patriarchs, Reuben , Simeon , or 
Lent, but from Iuda a fourth brother, and lb from Dauid a younger fonne of Iejfai ; 
and laftly we finde , that the Kingdonle it fclfe of ludawas not giucn to the Heire in 
nature, but to the Heire of grace, namely Salomon. 



10 







toc<; 






" ^7 



Sd'm. Voli.hiH: 
t-j. 

Mtcnb. Satur. 
1.1. e.8. 
Vim.l.ne.t,%. 




3* 

I 



i. V. 

Of the long Hues of the Patriarchs : and fome of late memorie. 

He third obiedion is, that the great difference ofyeares between thofe 
of the firft age, whereof fome ofthem had well nearefeene a thoufand 
yeares, makes it dilputable , whether theaccount of times were of the 20 
fame meafure as in after-ages , feeing that fbone after the floud menli- 
ued not a third part of that time, and in fucccedingages and to this 
day not the tenth. 

T hey that haue hereon refblucd that thofe yeares were but Lunariey eares , ( to ^ 
wit) of a Moneth or thereabouts,or *ALgyftian yeares, are eafily confutecfFor where- 
as Seth begat Enojh in the yeare of his life 105. if thofe yeares bee taken but for 
Moneths, then had Seth liued but eight yeares and one Moneth when he begat £-< 
w/J:andifthetimeof£»^hauethefimcallowance, when he begat Kenan, then- 
could Enofh at that time haue beene but fixe yeares and fortie eight weekes old ; and 
fb it maybegathered of thereft; excepting only Adam , who was created pcrfe&in 
his kinde, as were the trees in their kinde, bearing fruit and feede. But this were too 
ridiculous to imagine. For to giue an abilitie of generation at 6- 7. or 8. yeares, a- 
greeth with the fhort Hues ofthe Pigmies , and not with the conftitutions ofour firft 
Fathers, who being defcended from Adam, the workemanfhip of Gods hands , and 
begotten and borne in the ftrong youth ofthe world, had length of daics and abilitie 
of body agreeable. Againe, if we allow this idkconceit^ftheloinarie yeares, then 
there would follow this extremitic, that thole which liued longcft, and vpwardsof x 
nine hundred yeares, had by that accompt but the time of fourefcoreandtenand 
odde yeares , which were not only lefTe by farre then the Patriarchs liued after the 
floud, but fhort of many mens liues in this decrepitage ofthe world, wherein many 43 
exceedefourefcore, and fbme hundred yeares. Further (ifneede be) todifproue 
this reckoning, whereas it is written Gen.i 5 . That Abraham died in a good age, an 
old man, and of great yeares : all which (if the former account were of Lunarie 
yeares) makes but feucnteene and an halfe ofour yeares. 

And if we feeke for a caufc of this long life in nature,then is it reafbnablc,that the 
firft man, created in higheft perfection , f hould alfo beget children of equall ftrength 
or little differing : for ofthe firft and pureft feede there muft ofneceffitiejpjingvp the ' . 
£ nrcftand fruitfulleft Plants. Secondly , the earth it feffe was then muchlefle cor- 
rupt, which ycelded herincreafe , and brought forth fruit and foode forman , with- 
out any fuch mixture of harmefull qualitie , as fince that time the curfe of God for 53 
the crueltie of mans heart brought on it and mankinde : Neither had the waters of 
the floudinfufed fuch an impuritie , as thereby thenaturall and powerfull operation 
of all Plants, Hearbes , and fruits vpon the earth receiued a qualification and harme- 
full change. And as all things vnder the Sunne haue one time of ftrength , and an- 
other 



it. 

H 

c* 

l:z 



It 
feGc 






sa 






tl^w 



ft, 

"ore iii 



ethst* 



C h a p .5.^.5 . of the. Hljiorie of the World. 



11 



i-o 



10 



other of weakenefle, a youth and beautie,and then age and defbrmiric : Co Time it 
felfe ( vnder the deathfiill lhade of whofe winges all things decay and wit her ) hath 
wafted and worne out that liucly vertuc of Nature in Man , and Beafts , and Plants ; 
ycathe'Heaucns themfelues being of a moft pure and clcanfed matter (hail waxeold 
as a garment; and then much more the power generatiue in inferiour Creatnrcs,who. Tfikoi.v.i^ 
by the ordinance of God receiue operatiuc venue from the fupcriour. -; 

Butbciides the old age of the world , how farre doth our education and fimplici--. 
tie of liuing differ from thatold time I the tender bringing vpof children, firft fedde. 
and nourilhed with the milke of a ftrangc Dugge 5 an vnnaturall curiofitie hauing- 
tanght all women (but the begger) to linde out Nudes, which necefGtie only ought 
to commend vnto them : T he haftie marriages in tender yeares , wherein , Nature; 
being but yet greene and growing, we rent from her and replant her branches, while 
her felfe hath not yet any roote fufficientto mairitainc her ownetoppc; and fucb, 
halfe-ripc feedes (for the moft part) in their growing vpwitherin the budde, and 
waxc old cuen in their infancic. But aboue all things the exceeding luxurioufneile of 
this gluttonous age, wherein we preffe nature with oucrwaightic burdens, and ftrM 
dingher ftrengthdefeftiue we take the worke out of her hands, arid commit it to the 
artificiall helpe of ftrong waters, hot (pices , and prouokingiawces - y of which Lucaa 
hath theie elegant Verfes: 



20 



i \ 3f!0 . . ! TlaiptU.fy 

■ 






■ "i —o prodigarerunt . 

Luxuries, nunquam paruo contetrtafaratu : 
Et am fit or um terra pelagff/i ciborum 
t^yimbitiofa fames , & laut.c gloria wen fa, 
Difcite.quam paruo liceat fro duccre vitam : " 

Et quantum Natura pet at. ■. 

, 2(01% auro myrrhaque Ubunt : fed gurgite puro . 

Vitaredit :fatiseff populis fluuiujfc Cerefy. 

go Owaftfull Riot, neucr well content 

Withlow-priz'd fare $ hunger ambitious 

Of cat es by land andfea farre fetcht and fent, • 

Vaineglorieof a table (iimptuous, 

Lcarne with how little life may be preferued. 

In Gold and Myrrhe they ncede not to carroufe, 

But with the brooke the peoples thirft is ferued : 

Who fedde with bread and water are not Itemed, 

The ^Egyptians aSirme, that the longeft time of mans life is a hundred yeares,be- TitrJ&m l#t 
40 caulethe heart in a perfect bodiewaxeth and groweth to ftrength rlftie yeares, and 
afterwards by thefamedegree decaieth and withereth. Epigenes findeth in hiiPhilo- 
fophie.that the life of man may reach to the period of an hundred and twenftic yeares 
and Berofus to a hundred and feuenteen yeares. Thefe opinions Plmie repcatethand 
reproueth.producingmany examples to the contrarie. In thelaft taxation, number 
and reuiew of the eighth Region "oYltalie, there were found in the roll (faith Hinie) Fm.?. c .i% 
foureandfiftieperfons of an hundred yeares of age : feuenandnTtieofaijhmidred 
and ten : two, of an hundred and fiue and twentie : foure, of an hundred aui thjrtie; 
as many tliat were" hundred and flue and thirtie , or hundred, and feuen arid thirtie ■ .- : 
yeares old ; and laft of all three men of an hundred and fbrtie : and this-fearch was / 
5 made in the times tfyefpafim the Father and the Sonne. 



T hcfimpledi etand temperate lite of the Efmns gaue Aemjong account of ma- 



cap.X. 



ny yeares .-lodidlt to the Secretaries ofi^gyptian ceremonies, to the Perf/,ms , <Ma- 
gicians and Indian Brachmans, The Greckcs affirme out of Homer,, that 1\esior- liued Ffi».;,7.c.t»,' 
three ages, and Tirejiai[u.c, Sybillnhztc hundred yeares, Endymm of the leffe A{ia 

H i little 




>v-Z»- 



r 



rY" 



{ 



The fir ft TSooke ofthefirftpart Cha v.j.§.6. 

little leflc : AlfoOHa/iniJ/aoF Numidialmed very long, and Dtmdoof lllyria. Among 
the Kings o&Anadia many liued three hundred yeares {CxithEphorus J HeUamcuttir 
firmeth of the Epeians, that fome of them liue full two hundred yeares : and fodoth 
Diodorm Siculm of the Egyptians ; and that thefe reports are not fabulous;/?/^/** 
bringcth many witneffes with himfelfe, as, OHarethon, BeroJut,LMocbits,Ej{im, Hiero- 
nymut tsEgyptius, Hecat&w, Ephorits, and others. And i^Anthonie Fume an Hifto- 
rian of good reputation reported^ that in theyeare 1 5 70. there was mindim pre- 
faced to Solyman, Gcnerallot the Turkes Annie, who had out-liued three hundred 
yeares. I my felfe knew the old Counteflc of Defmondoi 'incbiqum in cvl&»// : «-,who 
liued in the yeare ij8p. and many yeares fince, who was married in Edwardthz 10 
fourths time, and held her Ioynturefrom all the Earles of Definond fince then; and 
that this is true, all the Noblemen and Gentlemen o?CWunfter can witneffe. stroz,- 
&ms Cigogna,om of TorquemadaU^iffaus , and the like Authours , telleth of fomc 
thathaue not only farre exceeded the termepreicribedby£/^w/; but beene re- 
paired from thewirhered eftate of decrepit age to frelh youth. But for length of 
life, if we note but the difference betweene the abilitie ofmen in thofe daies wherein 
Galen the Phifition liued, it may eafily proue vn to vs what reedes we are in refpecl: of 
thofe Cedars of the firft age. For Galen did ordinarily let bloud fixe pound weight, 
whereas f we (for the moft part) ftoppe at fixe ounces. But to conclude this part' 
there are jhreet hinges ( not counting Cqnftellations) which are the naturall caufes' 20 
ofalong amTKealthfull life* (to wit) ft&ng Parents, a pure and thinneaire,and tem- 
perate vie of diet , pleaiure, and reft : for thofe which are built of rotten timber , or ' 
mouldringftoric, cannorftand long vpright; onairewefeedealwaiesandin cuery 
inftant, and on meates but at times : and yet the heauie loade of abundance , where- 
with we opprefTe and ouercharge Nature , maketh her to finke vnawares in the mid- 
way; and therefore with a good conftitution , a pure aire, and a temperate vfe of 
thofe thinges which Nature wanteth , are the only friends and companions of a 
long life. 



^ VI. 

Of the Patriarchs deliuering their knowledge by Tradition : and that 
Enoch -writ before the flottd. 



3° 




79 



Vi*>Atttf. 



FoUh 



^IC'\ 



- H Mr it^forf"** & ™i 



Fourth fcruple hath beene made/How the certaine knowledge of the 
Creation came to Mofes feeing there was no Storie thereof wntten.and 
if any fuchhad beene, yet it is concerned, that all memorieof Antiqui-7? . 
tieperifhedinthevniuerfallfloud. 
But if we confider the curiofitieand policie ofelderages,we (hall find that know- 
ledge was the greateft treafurethat men fought for, and which they alio couered 40 
and hid from the vulgar fort, asiewels of ineftimable price, fearing theirreuerent 
conftruftion of the ignorant and irreligious: fo as whatfocuer was attained vnto con- 
cerning God, and his working in nature, the fame was not left to publike difpute,but 
deliuered ouer by heart and tradition from wife men to a pofteritie equally zealous, 
Exanimoinanimumji 'neliteris>mediointercedenteverbo , Frommindetominde -without 
Letter ;> by way of tradition or word of mouth. And it was though t by Efdras, Origen, 
and HiUrius, (as CMirandula conceiueth) that tMofesixA not oncly vpon the Mount 
receiue the Law from God.but withailfecretiorem & veromlegis enanationcm,amore 
ficret and true explanation of the Z<nj>,which (faith he out of the fame Authors,)'he de- 
liuered by mouth to lofuah, and Iofuah to the Elders: For to teach thefe myfteries, 50 
which hccalledfecretiora to the rude multitude were no other quam darefanctum ■ 
cambus &tnterporcosj}argeremargaritas\thentogiue holy things to Dodges, and to caff ■ 
p earles bef ore fwtne. In fucceeding times this vnderftanding and wifedome began to 
■be written in Ciphers, and Characters, and letters bearing tjhe forme ofbeaftes, 
c*£& fn-r*. f jntf*i<-yfi i.j7- 4bo & 1 J-Jtf birds, 




feprc 



■*«■*(*§ 

rotten timber, or' 
tmmik may £/* 
Jimdance, where- 
wrcsinthemitf. 
I temperatevfeof 
companions of a 



fl/A 



now/«fec of tfie 

,tof written^ 
oricofAnriqui-//' 

Kya ]/bcouered4^ 

i/tieirrenerent 
tamedvntocon- 
.geifputeM 



Chap.^.ci. e//^* Htfiorie of the World. 



19 



W 






birds, and odier creatures; and to be taught onely tofuch, as {trued in their Tem- 
ples, and to their Kings and Priefb. Of the firft the Cabala of the Iewcs was an imi- 
tation: the inuention of the otheris afcnbedto Zw*fter>'<JM^(,a>.Cadmiu and 
others; but falfely. 

This Cabala importeth a Law receiued by tradition and vnwrittcn. cabala ih He- tW&t &- 
brew isreceptWm Latuie, and a reciumg t in Englifti. And this cuftome was alio held e -'" ' hcehl ' £ 
by the Druids & Bards of our undent BntHincs, and of latter times by the mlh chro- Tutf^ 
meters called Rymers. Ifthen fuch as would feeme wifeft in the vie ofreafon wil not Mn^d.uofil 
acknowledge, thatthe ftorie of the Creation or beginning of all things was written 
i o by mfpiration, the holy Ghoft guiding the hand oFMofis- yet it is manifeft that the 
knowledgethercof might by tradition (then vied) be delmered vnto him by a more 
ccrtaine preemption, then any or all the teftimonies which prOphane antiquitie 
hadpreferued and left to their fucccflburs : which their wife men (as they terme 
them) did lay vp and defend from the iniurie of the time and other hazards For 
lcauing to remember that ^winftructed Seth, and Seth his children and fuccef- 
fours, which cannot be doubted Of, it is manifeft, that LMethttfalem liued together 
with ^^himfelfe two hundred fortie and three yecres, and Md mthmiethu 
falem no leffethenfiue hundred yeerest and before Noah died Abraham-was fiftie 
and aghtyeeres old ; from whence this knowledge by an cafie and ordiharie way 
20 might come to ifrael, and fo to Mofis. } 

But befides this tradition, it is queftionleflej that the vfe of letters was found out 
. intheverymfancieoftheworld, proued by thofe prophecies written oh pillars of 
. ftoneandBnckeby£»^:ofwhich/^/^affirmeth, that one of them remained 03 " r 
euen in his time, (meaning belike fome mine or foundation thereof) which pillars ' 
by others areafcribed .to Seth But ofthefe prophecies ok' Enoch Saint Imte teftifi- lidh - vlL 
- etth; and fome part of his Bookes (which contained the courfc of the Starres their 
names and motions) were afterward found in Arabia fidix in the Dominion of 
the Quceneof Saba: (faith Ongen) ofwhich Tertulltan AfErmeth thatheehad leene 
t and read fome whole pages. It is not therfore ftrange.that Mofes came to the know- ***»«* 
30 Iedgeofthe Creation and ftorie ofthe firft age, feeinghee mightreceiiieitboth by ""** 
tradition and letters, had not the fp.rit of God inftructed and infpired him as it did - 
wh.chalfohis many and ftrange miracles (performed before hee wrote the Scrip-' 
tures) make more manifeft. wreatnp 

Now for the Bookes of fiw jjhowfoeiier fome men make queftion of them furc 
lamthatTertu&av,0rigen,slu&t/lme,Bed4, Procopius, Gazeut, (with others) cite °'k-HmiUt- 

. , ten traditions alleageth that PopeGelafa among other the ApodryphaU Scrip- *££!** 
tures (which he reiecteth) namecTnotthefeofiW,; but that wfaatfoetor: was te- e ^<¥-'5. 
membred out ofthem.the fame was deliuc.red by Tradition from the Owes. But 
4o iratherthmke with Pererm that fuch a Booke there was, and that the fine was 
corrupted after thedeath of the Apoftles, and many things added thereunto by he- 
} Ir'fw' , t0 °i Ce ° Ccafl0n v P on the anti q ui tie thereof,- and out of that place 
ot^te/contending with thedeuill about the body ofUWbfo to frame and adde 
tnereunto many inuentions of their owne. One of the greateft arguments againft 
/ tnele Bookes, is that neither Phdo, nor Iofephus (the raoft diligent fearchcrs of An- 
ticjume) make mention thereof But againft it I will fet this opinion of Saint Av- 
v s t 1 n h, Scripfiffequidemnonnulla dimna Enoc n ilium feptimum abAvA m nera* 
renmpoffumm: ThatEx o zmhefeuenthfrom Adam didwntediuersdiuinethinrfwe 
cannot deme. Now his writings which came afterwards to light, were fufpected be- 
. caufe of the antiquitie,&of fables of Giants fuppofed to be begotten of Angels and I 
jo others; and by f muchtbe more,becauft^o fuch Booke was found amongft tnofe \ 
Canon,callScn P tures,keptbythediligenceof the Hebrew Priefts.n Armano lu- 
^ (faith Tertnkan) whoyetaffirmeththat this Booke might bee preferuedby 
■Noah. Surely that £»^ [wrote the prophecies remembred by Yeoman can S™ 

deniej 



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denie ; how they were dcliuercd to pofteritic I know not , whether by the Jewes Ca- 
bala, or by what other meanes,the fame is but mansconicclure. And (certainly) by 
the knowledge afcribed to Mahofthe motions of the heauens, and of the natures 
and conjunctions of the Starres ; and afterwards to fomc of his fonnes, to Zoroaster, 
and then to ^Abraham, it is very probable that Noah had fecne and might preferue 
thisbooke. Foritisnotlikely, that fb exquifite knowledge therein (asthefc-men 
had) was fiiddenly inuented and found out, but left by Seth to Enoch , and by Enoch 
to Noah, as hath bcene (aid before. And therefore if letters a nd arts wereknown e 
1 from the time of Seth to Enoch, and that Noah liuedwith Methufalem, y/h.0 liued with 
■Adam,zi4 Abraham liuedwith iW?Aitisnotftrange (I fay) toconceiuehow Mofes 
came to the knowledge of the firft Age, be it by letters , or by Cabala and Tradition, 
had the vndoubted word of God nccde ofany other proofc then fclfe-authoritie. 



jq 



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$ VII. 

of the men ofrenowme before the fond. 

Ow let vs confider the relation of Mofes, who nameth feuen deferents of 
Cains children, and of Adamby Sethtm. : JtfAbcinggiuenbyGodin 
fteadof^W; and of Seth was Enofi begotten, in whole time men be- 20" 
ganneto profeffe Religion , and to offer facrifice in publike. For al- 
though Adam inftru&ed his children in the knowledge of God their 
Creatour, as appeared by the facrifice bfferdd by Cain and Abel; yet it feemeth that 
after the birth of Enofi mcrtbeganne publikely to call on the name of the Lord, that 
is, they fcrucd and praifed God by Communion and in publike manner, or calling 
vpon the nameof the Lord, and thereby were the fonnes of God or the godly diftin- 
guifhed from the wicked. From the birth of Enojh the fonne of Seth to the time of 
Henoch the fonne of Iared there is nothing rcmembrcd by CMofes, but their owne 
births, the birthsoftheir fonnes, the length oftheirliues,and deaths. Butof Henoch 
it is written, that hewalkedwitbGod,atid hewas no more feene^j: for Godtookchima.- 30 
way. By that/hat he wa!keIwJth~God,-was meant,that he was a iuft and vpright man, 
and that he feared,loued,and obayed God. For the fame phrafe Mefesv feth of Noah. 
Noah wasaiuftandvprightmaninbistime,andl>io ah walkedwithGod. TheSc- 
uentie conuert it , Enoc h placuit Tseo : H e n o c h f leafed God. And although 
Aben-Eiraawd others vnderftand this place, (tuliteumVem:)fcilicet, mortuttself, 
(Godtooke him may (that is) he died, which (indeedc) agreeth both with the phrafe of 
) the Scripture,and with our manner of fpeech to this day, to fay, Godtookehima- 
7 'way, when hedied^ yet the difference which Mofes makethbetweenethepietieof 
/ /&>w^andthereftoftheiVr/Ww,andbyomittingtheword (death) which he v- 

feth to all elfe, makes it manifeft, that Henochwas not diflblued as the reft. For to all 40 
1 thereftof the Patriarchs, Jt/tf/«vfeththefewordes, Andhedied; but of Henochhe 
fpakc otherwife, faying only, he was mifing, or he was notfeene^j. Etnon ini'.eniebatur 
(faith the Epiftle to the Hebrewes) quia Bens earn tranfldit, And hewas notfo:ind,for 
the Lordtooke him away. In the fame place it is exprefly added, that hefaw not death. 

But whether this taking away of Enoch were not with the fame kinde of changing, 
which S l . Paul promifeth when he faith, that when the end full come, we jhallnot alldie y 
but all (loallbe changed, I leaue it to the learned Diuines. 

After Henoch , Mofes paffeth ouer to Methufalem and Lantech , remembring (as of 
the reft) the times of theirbirth and death : fauingthat Z««W;<prophecied of his 
fbnne Noah, faying, This fame fljall comfort vs concerning our worke , and forrow of our j ® 
hands, as touchingthe earthwhich the Lord hath curfed. Of7^j>ah,C^rofeswntethmorc 
amply, then of any of the reft of Adams children by Seth, being the laft of the ten ge- 
nerations of the firft Age, whom God (with his familie) preferued , becaufe hewas 
an vpright man in his time, and feared God* 

But 



^ 







C h a p . ?,§. 8 . of the Hi/toris of the World. 



Si 



re men 



But of the warre, peace, gouernement, and pollieic of thele Strong and mightie 
; men, fo able both in bodie and wit, there is no memorie remaining : whole Stories 
ifthey had beene preferued , and what elfc was then performed in that newnefle of 
the world, there could nothing of moredclight haue becne left to poftcntie. For the 
exceeding long Hues of mcn(who to their Strength of'body and natural! Wits had the 
experience added of 800. and 900. yeares) how much of ncceffity mult the lame 
addc of wifedome and vndertakings » Likely it is,that their works excelled all what" 
ibeucrcanbetoldofafter-times, especially in refpecr of this old age of the world, 
when we no Sooner beginne to know,but we beginne to diejaccording to Hippocrates. 
10 Vitabreins,arslonga\ tempm pneCeps, (which is) Life is fljort , Art is long , arid Time is ^iplw.xi 
headlong. And that thofe people of the firlt age performed many things worthy ad- 
miration, it may be gathered out ofthefe words of M oses, Thefi were mighty men, Gcs.iM 
which in old time were men of renowne. But theSe men of rcnowne (whom the Scrip- 
' ture afterwards calleth Giants, both for ftrength of bodie and crucltic ofrnindc) tru- $ < 
ftcd Co much to their owne abilities, as they forgat altogether the pietie of Seth, and 
the waics wherein Henoch walked : for -all the imaginations of "their -hearts were emll, only V. $! 
emll, and continually emll. And this wickednefTe was not only found in the iffues of 
Cam, but it was then vniuerM, when the children and ibnnes ofGod,(or of the god^ 
■ ly) were corrupted and milted by their idolatrous wiues, the Daughters of Cam , or 
10 of thole other men louing themSelues and the world only. 

That thcCcfonnesofGodwac Angels, which being taken with the beautieof wo- Ce-a.j. v.i*l 
men accompanied them and begat Giants, fome of the Fathers fuppoSed, namely 
Lactant'ms and Eufebim milled by lofe ph us : of whom I cannot doubt , but that they 
afterward changed their former opinions. And of this miftaking many Writers 
haue taken great aduantage, and haue troubled themfelues with large anfweres and 
very necdlelfe : the queftion being yncapablc of" difpute , especially lince St. chryfo. 
flomeand S c . ^lugustine haue anfwered it largely long agoe. For, that good and 
godly men were honoured with the title of Gods children , it doth eueiy where' ap- 
pearem the Scripture; and on the comrade, to thinkc that Angels, who (aschmj 
30 witnelfeth) behold the faccofGod, (that is) alwaies attend his commandements, 
mould after a Separation from the reft which fell with Lucifer For fAc the glorious 
prefence of their Creatour, and become Incubi, or Succubi , contrarie both to nature 
and grace, were more then madnefle to imagine. 



.Vinjv" A 



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$. VIII. 

That the Giants by M o s £ s fo called were indeede men of huge bodies 1 asalfo 
dmers in latter times. 

F thele Giants which CUofes calleth mightie men , Goropus Becanus 
an Antuerpian ( who thought his owne wit more Gigan ticall then the 
bodies of Nimrod or Hercules) hath written a large difcourSc, intituled 
Gigantomachia, and {trained his braines to proue,that there were neuer 
any Such men : his rcafons (whofoeuer deiires to loofe time) he may 
finds : them in the Treatifes before named. It is true that Cynllus reproues the Gne- 
. cian 1 pets for their monftrousfiaions . w ho affirme ihamelelly, That the Giants 
haue in elder times not only calt vp mountaincs vpon mountames , butremoucd 
IJLrnds out of the Sea , with like fooleries. And for that muention ofcafting vp hils 
jo and making warre with the Gods, no doubt but that the Same was borrowed outof 
the Stone of Nimrod, as before remembrcd ; and euen out of this Scripture That 
the SonnesofGodfaw the Daughters of Men, of whom the firlt Giants were be 
gotten was that conceit taken of Orpheusnnd He/iodus, That Giants werethefonnes 
ot the Heauen and the Earth ; meaning by the Heauens the fonnes of God , and by 

the 



44 



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the Earth the- daughters ofmen: which verfes of Orpheus arc by IchnCaffam (who 
hath written a wittie difcourfe of this fubieft ) thus changed into Latine. 

Nomine t defies illos dixere Gigantes 
Om quod ten a fuer int & /anguine call. 

From the Earth,and from thy bloud.O heauen,thcycame, 
Whome thereupon the Gods did Giants name. 

But what wiii not Opinjators and felfc-beleeuing men difpute of,and make doubt 1 o ( 
of, if they cannot conceiuc that there were in the firft A ge fiich kind ofmen ; and of 
which there haue bcene in all times fince? Seeing the Scriptures auow the one mani- 
feft!y,and common experiencetheother? 

And for that fuperlatiue {training of words, and the meaning of them, that the 
name of Giants was giuen to oppreilburs and Tyrants, and not to ftrength of body 
and eminent ftaturc: fuch men might with better rcafbn call them oppreilburs bc- 
caufethcy were Giants , and therefore had abilitie to oppreftc, then fay, That they 
were called Giants onely, becaufe oppreilburs. For firft Mofes himfelfe calleth 
them mightic men 5 which flicweth a ftrength furpaffing others : and afterwards, 
men ofrcn^wjic^lthatis) of great vndertaking andaducnturousaftion. Andifthe 20 
lamcftaturc of body, and abilitie had not Taeciie found "among dfuefsT?ations after 
the generall floud, then might this placcof Mofes haue more willingly hearkned to a 
difpute, and yeelded to interpretation. 

But befides all thefe famous Giants found in prophane Hiftories (which I will re- 
ferae to accompanie the Giants of C^&w in the Storie of Britanie) the Scriptures - 
doc clearely and without/all allegoricall conftruftion auow, That, befides Nimrod, 
there were found of thefe Giants in the nmcof Abraham, oiMofies, oflofua, and of 
■Dauid; namely the Rephaims in Afiteroth; the Zucd or ZanzMmtumsm Ham, and the 
Emims, which dwelt anciently in the land of CMoab : whom Mofes (for ftature) com- 
pareth with the Anakims,which dwelt in Hebron-fiox they alfb were taken forGiants 30 
■as the Anakims: Likcwife where Mofes fpeakcth of the land ofAmmon, he vfeth thefe 
words. That alfo was taken for a land of Giants, for Giants dwelt therein aforetimes: and, 
whomethe Ammonites callZamMimmims: a people that was great, and many, and tall as 
the Anakims. And thefe Giants called Rephaims'm Afieroth and ICarnaim,and the Zu- 
%.£i or Zanzttmmims, chedorlaomer King ofElam ouerthrcw , affiftcd by other Kings 
hisaffociates. Alfb the Prophet ^/mw found among the Ammonites mono? Giant- 
like ftaturc, whome he compareth to the Cedar, and whofe ftrength to the Oakes^ 
and the Prophet Bauvch, Thefe were the Giants famous from the beginning, that were 
of 'fo great flature,andfio expert in warre_j. Particularly it is written of Og, King of 
Bafan, that his beddc ofyron was nine cubits long , and fourc cubits broad : for only 40 
Og King of Bafan remained of the remnants of the Giants , who commanded the 
Kin^dome of Bafan, foure hundred yearcs after the expedition of chedorlaomer. 
Moreouerthofodifcouercrsandfearchers of the Land of promifc ( font by CMofies 
from Cadesharre'm Varan) made report at their rcturne of the great ftature of thofe 
people in generall, and especially ofthc fonnes of ^Jnak, in thefe wordes. i^dll the 
people which ivefaw in it are men ofigreatfiature : for there wefaw Giants , the fonnes of 
A n a k which come of the Giants, fo that we feemedin our fights likegraffe-hoppers, andfo 
we were in their fight, (thatis) thefearchers foundin their owne judgements a meruai- 
lous difference betweene the <^fnakimsmd themfclues : infbmuch that the lfraelites 
w'ere fb ftricken with f care, as they rather fought and defired to rcturne againe into jo 
^Sgypt ; and were more willing to endure their former flaucric, then to fell by the 
ftrokes ofthofe fearefull Nations. Furthermore the Scriptures put vs out of doubt, 
that Goliah the I'hilislineofGath was a Giant of fixe cubits and a fpanrre long ■ the ar- 
mour which he wore waighed fine thoufend filicides of brafix : the ftiaft of his fpearc 

• ' ' was 






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waslikc a wcauers beamc,afld his fpcarehcad waighedlixe hundred iMc%ks^|i^on. 
Alio in Samuel there is mention ofanother GolLth Ilrnarned Getheus, becaufe he was 
o?Gitb : and of three other Giants ; of which the firfl was flaine by rehon*tha& , Xte- 
«/*f Nephew, who had twelue fingers, and as many toes : a man of great nature, and 
his fingers were by fixes, cuen foure and twentie. • 

• Alfothat^w^Sgwasoflurpallingftraigthnomandoubteth, who tore a Lion i»d.i*6. 

asithadbeencaKiddc,andafterflewthirtie of the Philijlines, and (after that") a 
, rhoufand more of them with a jawbone of an AfTe ; And laftly he tooke the gates 
oi\_A~zzah, and thetwopofts,and lifted themaway with the barres, and put them 
i o vpon his fhoulders , and carried them to the toppe of the Mountainc before Ebron. 
If then it be approued by euery iudgement, that both Nature and the Heauens 
' waxcold, and that the great age of time hath (with it felfe) infeebledandalmoff. 
worne out the vertueofall things, then I lay, That as in all other kindes the Earth 
(before that Sinne had increafed the curie and corruption) brought forth her young 
ones moreffrong and beautifull then it did in after-ages : fo alio thole Giants , thole 
mightiemen, and men of renowne as farre exceeded the proportion , nature and 
flrength of thole Giants remembred by CMofesoi his owne timc,and after him their 
fucceiTours, as the ordinarie proportion of all men in generall , loone after the floud 
and in times farre off, exceeded the bulkes and bodies of men which are now borne 
30 in the withered quarter and Winter of the world : If therefore Giants were com- 
mon ijntathird and fourth age , much more in the firft flourilhing youth and new 
nolle of the world. 

But the wickednelTe (efpecially in crucltie and oppreffion) of thele men was fuch 
as God therefore by the floud gaue end to all flelh, but to thciuft 7%oab and his fa- 
milic. AndGodrepentedhmithathehadmademan,wb.kh S c . A "ngufi 'me thus expoun- Gate's 
deth : 2{equeenimfcut kominem, ita Beumfacti fui pasnitet , cuius est de omnibus om- »<• cmitl-Dd. % 
mno rebus tamfixafenttntia, quam certaprxfeientia. Sedfi non vtatur Script am tSbm 
•verbis, nonfe quodammodo familiarius mfnuahit omni generi hominum , quibits ■usdteffe 
confultum : -vt &perterreatfupcrbientes, & excitet negligentes, & exerceat querent es , & 
30 aUtintelligentes, God (faith he) doth not repent him of my thing which he hathdone; 
(asmenvfetodoe) but if the Scripture did mfvfethofe wordes or the like , it Jhodd "' 
not (in a fort) infmmte it felfe familiarly to all forts of men, for whom it 
would prouide: that it might terrifie the proud, (Hrrcvp the 

negligent , exercife thefearchers of truth, and n <~ 

-, nourifl) thofe that vnder- J 

jland* 



40 



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Thefirfl TZooke of the fir ft part 



C H A P.O'.J.I.J 




Ofidolatrons corruptions, quickp ri/mg, and hardly at length 
'■** yam/hmg in the world : and of the It^liques of Truth 



«M\r* 



,-**«* 



touching thefe ancient times , obfcurely ap- 
pearing infablei and old 
Legends. 



lO 



C*' 



V 









$. I. 

That in old corruptions we may finde feme fignes of more ancient truth. Yj 

Ere before we proceede any further, theoccafionof- 
fcreth it folfe for vs to confider , how the Greekes and 
other more ancient Nations, by fabulous inuentions, ac > 
and by breaking into parts the Storie of the Creation, 
and by deliuering it ouer in a myfticall fenie,wrapping 
it vp mixed with other their owne trumperie, haue 
fonght to ob/cure the truth thereof; and haue hoped, 
that after-ages , being thereby brought into many 
doubts , might receiue thofe intermixt difcourfes of 
God and Nature for the inuentions of Poets and Phi- 
losophers, and not as any thing borrowed or ftolne 
Out of the bookes of God. But as a skilfull and learned Chymitt can alwell by Sepa- 
ration of vifible elements draw helpfull medicines out of poyfon , as poyfbn out of 5 op 
\ the moftheakhfullhearbs and plants (all things hauing in themfelucs both life and 
» death) fb, contrarie to the purpofes and hopes ofthe Heathen, may thole which 
feeke after God and Truth Hndeout euery where, and in all the ancient Poets and • 
Philolbphers, the Storie of the firft Age ,= w ith all the workes and maruailcs thereof, 
amply and liucly expreft. 




?4r71'*> 



-i~ 



{. II. 

That the corruptions themfelues were 'very ancient : as in the familie d/Noak, 
and in the old Egyptians. 



40 




Vt this defection and falling away from God, which was firft found in 
Angels , and afterwards in Men (the one hauing erred but once , the • 
other euer) as concerning mankindc it tooke fiich effect , that thereby 
(the liberall grace of God being withdrawne) all the poftentic of our • 
hrft Parents were afterwards borne and bred in a world , Suffering a 
pcrpetuall Eclipfeof (pirituall light. Hence it was that it produced plants of fuch 
I imperf ection and harmefull qualitie, as the waters ofthe generall floud could not fo 
Wafli out or depure, but that the fame defection hath had continuancein the very 
^ generation and nature of mankinde. Yea, eucn among the few fonnes of Noah there 50 
were found flrong effects ofthe former poyfon. For as the children or Sem did inhe- 
rit the vertues ofseth, Enoch, and 'Noah ; fo the fonnes of Cham did pofTefle the vices 
ofthe fonnes of Cain, and ofthofo wicked Giants ofthe firft Age. Whence the chal- 
^Awwbcganncfbonc after the floud to afcribediuine power and honour to the crea- 
ture, 



'<hV> 



40AB, 



of** 



*'f 



.(iff' 






Chap. 6.§J . o/Vfo Hiftorie of the World. 

V ture, which was only due to the Creatour. Firft , they worlhippcd the Sunnc , and 
*' then the fire. So the Egyptians and Phcenieums did not only lcarne to leaue the true 
God, but created tweluefeuerall Gods,and diuinc powers,whom they worfli?pped ; 
and vnto whom they built Altars and Temples. For Herodotus taixh, duodeam Deo- Hend.bi Enter, 
rum nominaprimos Jugyptiosinvfihabuife , at que Graco's'ae'mis cepiffe mutuatbs, cofii t e - 
prius aras, & imagines, dr templx Di/s fib/ erexifle, The Egyptians (faith he) first deui- 
fedthe names of the hvelue Gods , which the Greek es receiuedfiom them , ivho fir ft erected 
'unto them felues Altars, Images, andTemplesfor the Gods. 



10 




That in proceffe of time thefe lejfer err ours drew on greater : ,rs ap- 
pear eth in the grojfe fuperfitions of the 
%Aigjptians, 

Vt as men on ce Men away from vndoubted truth , doe then after 

wander for eucrmorein vices vnkno wne", and dayjie trauaTIe towards 

their etcrnall perdition ; fo did thele groffe and blindcldolatcrs euery 

age after other deJccnd lowerand lower,and fhnnke and Hide downer. 

wards from the knowledge of one true and very God ; and did not / -,'f °/ \ 7 £'. 6 



V. 



30 



40 



50 



thereby crre in worfhipping mortall men only, but they gauediuinereuercncc, and, L. - 
had the iamerefpeef to Bcafts, Birds, Fifhes, Fowles, Winds, Earth, Water, Ayre, f 
Fire, to the Morning, to the Eucning, to Plants, Trees and Rootcs, toPaffionsancJ I 
Affections oftheminde, to Paknefle,Sickncfre,Sorrowes, yeato themofbnwor- 
thy and bafeft of all thefe. Which barbarous blafphcmie Rhodim Anaxandridesdc- »- cm 1 , e , 
ndeth in this manner. - W"*'''"? 

Bouem colls, ego Deis malt bouem. 

Tu maximum Anguillam Deum putas : ego 

Obfoniorum credidt fuauifimum. 

Carnes fuillas tu caues , at gaudeo 

Hijs maxim e ; canem colts, quern verbera 

Edentem vbideprehendo forte obfomum, 

I lacrfRce to God the Bcefe, which you adore. 
I broile the Egyptian Eeles, which you (as God) implore > 
You feare toeatc the flelh of Swme, Ifindcit fweet. 
You wor[hip Dogs, to beate them I thmkc meete, 
When they my ftore deuoure. 



And in this manner Ivvenal, 

Forrum aut cxpe nefas violare autfr anger e morfu : 
O fanclds gentes, quibus hue nafcunturin hortis 
7{jimina ! 

T he Egyptians thinke it finne to roote vp, or to bite 
Their LeekesorOnyons, which they feme withholyritc-: 
O happie Nations, which of their owne fowing 
Haue ftore of Gods in euery garden growing. 



$. IIII, 




Sataf.z.p, 



85 





<~ta 



The fir ft < Boo{e of the fir ft fart Cha p.o'. §.q., 
$. mi. 

■That from the reliques of 'ancient records among the Egyptians and others , thefrjl 

idols and fables were inuented : and that the firft I v P i t £ s. was 

Cain,Vvlcan, Tvbalcain, &c t 

Vt in fb great a confufion of vanities, where among the Heathens //• 

themfelues rhere is no agreement or certaintie, it were hard to find out 

from what example the beginnings of thefeinuentions wereborowed 

or after what ancient patterne they erected their building, were it not io 

certaine, that the Egyptians had knowledge of the firft Age, and of 

whatfbeuer was done therein* partly from fome i nfcriptions vpon flone or mettall 

7? remaining after thefloud, and partly from Mizraim the Lome ot Cham, who had 

learnt the fame oi'cham, and Cham of his father Noah. For all that the Egyptians 

write of their ancient Kings and dase oftimcs cannot be fained . And though other 

Nationsafterthem had by imitation their lupiters a\Co, their Saturnes, Vulcans, and 

Jug. ?.T9.f ."• t-Mercuries with the reft which S c . Auguftine out oiVarro-,Eufebius out of many pro- 

Etfe'biuPr*? P nane y^^Q^ns-,cicero,DiodorHssiculuo,<^Jrnobius,^ndmmy more haue obferued, 

H;<mfc'.y.&'i. to wit, the Phoenicians, Phrygians, Cretians, Greekes, and other Nations ; yet was Cain 

^the fbnne of Adam ( as fome very learned men conceiue,) called and reputed for the 2 9 

'firft and ancient Jupiter; and Adam for the firft Saturne : for lupiter was faid to haue 

inuented the founding of Citties; and the firft Cittie of the world was built by Cain, 

which he called Enoch,oi whom were the Hcnochij before rcmembred. And Co much 

may be gathered out of Plato in Protagoras , which zlfoHig inus fa.h\s 27 5. chapter 

confirmeth. Forbcfides that, many Citties were founded by diucrs fnen , Tamen 

primam latifimam aprimo et antiquiflimo Ioue adificatam.yet the firft and largeft was built 

by the firft andmoft ancient I v r 1 t e R.,feated in the Eaft parts, or in India, according to 

that of CMofes : And Cain dwelt towardesthe Eaft fide of Eden ejre. where alfo the tie* 

nochij were found after the floud. And therefore was lupiter by the Athenians called 

Polieus, a Founder of Citties, and Herceios, an Inclofer or ftrcngtheher of Citties; (fay 3 °" 

■phom. idem- phornutus and Paufanias) and that to lupiter Herceios there were in very manypla- 

T**bnj7l& ccs Altars and Tem P les erected And that there were Citties built before the floud. 

iojM?rouzo. Plato alfo witneffeth,as may be gathered in this his affirming, that foone after man - 

. kindb egan to incre afe, the y builtmany Citties; w hich as his meaning he deliuereth 

""P lihAX) m P^inc tcrmes, in his third booke of lawes: for hee faith, that Citties w ere huilr an 

yyvw e xceeding fpace of time before the deftrudfrion by the great floud> 

This Milupitcr , of the Ethnickes was then the fame Cain , the fbnne of Adam y 
who marrying his owne fifter (as alfo lupiteris faid to haue done) inhabited the 
Eaft, where Stephanus de vrbibus placeth the Cittie Henochia. And befides this Cittie 
of 'Henoch, Philo ludausconcciueththtt Cain built fixe others, asCMdich, Pared, Tehe, 40 

Scn if a, ^\^- ca -'§^, a S^- G i^ t ' fe u £^ here p *" l ° ^ tnis I know P ot - Now as Cain was the firft 
' ' 1 A*i • ^ ^lupiter, andtrom whome alio the Ethnickes had the/inuention of facrifice : fb were ' 
lub.il, Tubaland Tubalcajn (inuentorsofpaftorage,fmiths-craft,and m'ufick) the fame 

ftS. Ufjfj, which were called by the ancient prophane writers CHercurius , Vulcan and Apollo j 
and as there is a likelihood of name betweene Tubakain and Vulcan : Co doth Augu- 
ftine cxpou nd the nam e of Noema or Naamath , the fifter of Tubalcain , to fignifie Ve- '" 
nn'sta, or beautifull Voluptas, or pleafiire; as the wife of : Vulcan is faid to be Venus, the 
Lady of pleafure and beautic. And as Adam was the ancient and firft Saturne, Cain 
the eldeft lupiter, Eua Rhea, and Noemaox Naamath the firft Venus: fb did the fable of 
the dmiding of the world betweene the three brethren the fbnnes of Saturne mlk, eg 
from the true ftory of thediuidingofthe earth betweene the three brethren the 
fbnnes of Noah: Co alfo was the fiction of thofe golden apples kept by a dragon ta- 
3cen from the Serpent, which tempted Euah: Co was Parody fe it felfe tran/ported out 
oi Afta into Africa, and made the garden of the Hefperides: the prophecies, that 

Chrift 



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Chap . tf .^4 . of the Hifiorie of the World. 

chrtfi fhould breake the Serpents head, and conquer the power of Hell, occafioncd V 
trie fables of Hercules killing the Serpent of ' Hcjperides, and defending into Hell,and 
captiuating Cerberus : fo out of the taking vp of Henoch by God was borrowed the 
conuerfion oftheir.jS&gWjCd icInnentorsofReli^iori andfiich artes as the life of 
man had profit by ) into ftarresand hcauenly fignes, and ( withall) that leauingof 
theworld, and alcenfionoO/Zr^; of which Quid, 



Vltima cceleftum terras Ajlrxa reliquit 
Aftrsea laft of heauenly wights the earth did leaue. 



0md.21ctJ.zi 



ID 



tlat.CamJ.i, 



v.i. 
Gen. 7. 
Getici.iz.ih 



20 



1° 



For although thereby the Ethnickes would vnderftand Iuftice itfclfe tohaue 
failed,as it is a vertue abftracl, and may bee confidered without a pcribn 5 yet as it is 
vfuall among the ancient Poets to deicribc vcrtues and vices by the perfons of men 
and women as defire by Cupid, valour by OMars , bcautie orluft by Venus ,fo 
doe they alio the perfons of men by like vertues and vices ; and therefore by Iuftice 
and ^firxa, Enoch : the Iuftice and pietie of Enoch being in the fame manner ex- 
preft, as that of Noah was by Mofes for Neah was laid to bee a iuftmaii; <^And 
N o a h walked with Godi And of Enoch it is written , that he walked with God , and he 
was no morejeene: for Godtooke him may. 

From this ftoriealfo ofthe firft Age, and from that part where c%/?j- remem- 
breth the Giants begotten by thefonnes of good men vpon the daughters ofthe 
wicked (whomeiV/^j-callethmightie men, and men of renowne) did theyfteale 
thofe wondrous great aftes of their ancient Kings,and powerfull Giants^and agame 
their warrevndertakenagainft the Gods, from the building ofthe Tower oi'Babel 
by the Giant Nimrod, as S*. ^ugufliKeteimethhiai. Which warre of their Gi- ^ecimt.vsK 
ants Cornelius Seuerm thus defcribeth,, "7 

Tdntauere (nefas) olim detrudere mtmdo 
Sydera, captiuifc I o v i s trans ferre Gigantes : 
lmperhm, & victo leges imponcre ccelo. 



•\ 



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The Giants did aduance their wicked hand 
Againftthe Starres,tothruftthem headlong dowrie 
And robbing I o v e of his Imperiall crowne 
On conquered Hcauens to lay their proude command. 



SrtW^ 



Whereby was meant that JV&wWpurpofed toraife the building oiBabelto tfiaf. 
height, as God neither by drawing waters from the dcepe, nor by any conjunction 
' °i u S u rr - e - s ' fll0uld kurie them vnder the moyfture of a fecond floud, but that by 
40 this, building (if they had beenc herein victorious) they would hauegiuentheLaw 
to Heaucn it Iclfe. Alio the making of leagues , peace and couenants among Hea- 
then nations and Kings, confirmed by facrifice,whereof Ftrgiibothm the eight and 
twelfth of his iEncidcs hath a touch, was as it feemeth borrowed from Mofes, Exod. 
1 4. Who when he read the Booke ofthe couenant fprinkled the people with blood, 
We hnde alfo many remembrances o?Seth, the paternall Ancefter of 'Henoch and 
Noah- for Amenophts, the fame King o$*AEgypt, which reigned at fuch time as Mofes 
caned thence the children of/frael, (as of late fome learned men miftaking his time 
iuppofed) called his fonne and iuccciiaur Sethe , otSeth, and of the hmeSeth (as 
many men of good judgement haue graunted) were the Princes of Thrace called 
jo ^«/*«, whereof there were many very famous. But herein was the memoricof TlutM Jf.ic, 
Set,} moft manifeftly preferued , that the ^Egyptians worfliipped Sethis their moft 
ancient parent, and ofthe firft tradition: in honour of whome they called a princi- 
pallProumce^foto. WcaKo fmdmBithynia theCittieof Sethia, and others of amUi* 
the fame name elfewhere. And fure from the Egyptians did the Gr&aans borrow, 

I 2 this 



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, this kind of Thcologic , though they fcorned to acknowledge any anricjuitie praxc- 
' ding their owne; and that they might not feeme to learne clfcwhere , they gaue the 
| fame names to their ownc Idoles which the Egyptians did to theirs. 

^' ?Y J> r 't '•* "' x 7° "~hr& ■ 

Of the three chiefefi Iv r i t ers j tirfd thejlrangejlorie of the third. 

Vt of all thofe Armies of luf iters remembred by the Ancients, Ci- 
cero maketh but three , becaufe thofe were of moft fame: which o- 
ther writers haue alfo done, who fought out, and laboured in their io 
originals . 

The firft was luf iter , the fonne of ^Ether and Dies , fo called , be- 
caufe the one had reference to his caeleftiall conditions {for other is as much aslhi - 
nin gorpure jire) the other difcouered his naturall vertues , which daies and times 
make morcperfect, and are the witneffes of mens aitions. 

The fecond was laid to bee thefbnne of Caelum or Heauen, for the famefbrmer 
refpeclj-and this lupiter was an Arcadian, and King of Athens. 

The third of whom all the Graxianfables were deuifed, was ofcreete ( now Can- 
die') the fonne of Saturne and Ofs. The name deriued from the Latine is taken of 
Mums Pater, from the Greekeword Zeus, it fignifieth life, but fomewhatfirayncd. ao 
Jsoccasin his gcncalogie of the Gods conceiueth , that hisname was borrowed from 
luf iter the Planet; but whether that ftarre had inch a name, before the fame was gi- 
oen to men, I know not. l upiter is hot and moift,temperatCyrnodeft, honeft, aduen- 
tu rous, liberal!, mercifull, lowing, and faithfull, (that is) giuing "thefe "Inclinations. 
• And therefore thofe ancient Kings beautified with thefe condition s might be called 
there after luf iter ; but howfocuer they were, or were not with thofe vertues enrich- 
ed, yet, by imitation, all Kings in the eldeft times aflumed thofe titles and firnames: . 
great Princes affecting as nigh titles of honour and reputation in the world , ( how- 
ioeuer deferued ) as the worihieft.that euer were, acquired by their well defcruings. 
JouaomnesJReges vociru nt antiqui , The Ancients called all Kwges Ivpiters as 3 o 
T z e t z e s in his Variahiftoria confirmeth : Reges olim louesvoctirunt omnes: Inold 
times alligations called their Kings Ivpjters. But where this laft and moft remem- 
bred luf iter was borne it is vncertaine. Some there are that make Jvjrn of Creet .- o- 
m.cem.l.i.c.7 tbers, that hewas but font thither by his mother Ofs or Ofis, to be fbftered and hid- 
den from the fury of Titan his vnclc: becaufeitwas conditioned betweenc Saturne 
and Titan, that Saturne being a yonger brother , and raigning ( for his ownelife ) by 
Titans permiffion, he (hould put to death all his male children,lcaft the Titans might 
be interrupted by any of them in their fucceffion; which agreement becaufe Saturne 
performed in his firft borne, it is fained that Saturne deuoured his owne children. • 
Hereof Lycofhron, thus turned into Latine. . ^ 



Maud fit finguior, 
Crudisfefulchrum quod fit iffefilijs. 

S a t v r. n e to be the fatter is not knowne 
By being the graue and buriall of his owne. 

This compofition betwecne Titan and Saturne, Sybilla alfo witnefleth in thefe, 
Concepts verbis ;Titan iurare coegit 
Satvrnvm, defc nttum ne nutriat z/llum, 
Quo fofint regnare fenis fost fata Nefotes. 5 $ 

Things thusagrecd:T 1 tan made Satvrne fweare 
No Sonne to nourifli ; which by raigning might 
Vfurpe the right of T iians lawful! Heire. 

But 



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Chap . d.^.?. c/^<? Hiftorie of the World. 






But 0/w, the mother of Jupiter, being deliuered at once both of Jupiter and 7#w, 
conucied Jupiter (firftcalkd Lyfanuit) into Crete, as lhee did afterwards his two 
brothers, Neptune and Pluto : where hce was brought vp in Gnojfus, thechiefcCi- 
tieof that ifland, by Crefia the King, or by the Curetes, a people and nation thereof. *-4>b.\vtmf. 

Others challenge him to be of Thebes, mA a Thebane : others call him an Arcadian: 
others make him oiMeJJ'ena. The like contention is found among the Greckes tou- 
ching his education and Hrft foftcring. Some affirmc, that he was fed by honic-bees: 
in recompence whereof he changed their black coats and skinnes into yellow^a re- 
ward well fitting fuch a Goch others, that he was nourilhed by Beares : others, by 

I0 Goats;and of all thefe the idle Greekeshaue many prettietales.But in the end when 
Titan had; knowledgc,that Saturne had broken his faith,he let on him,and tooke him 
and his wife prifbners, whom Jupiter agmne relcued and deliuered. 

Butlaftly , the Father and the Sonne squally ambitious, the one doubted the 
other. Saturne being the leffe powerfull fled into Italic, and left his Kingdomesin 
Greece to his fonne. And although this Prince at the rirft purchased great honour, 
and for his many vertues the name of Jupiter was giucn him ; yet, after he was once 
ietled and became potent,he gaue himfelfe ouer wholly to palliardize and adulterie, 
without all refpeftoflipnour, law, or religion. And it is reported by fuch, as doe afc 
cribelhe actions of many to one Jupiter, that not therewith fatifried , he was after- 

20 wardes knowne to offend in the finne oiSodome with Ganimedes and others ; and did 
not onely begin with inceft, marrying his owne lifter Juno, but he rauilfied, betray- 
ed, ftolc away,and tooke by ftrong hand all the beautifull women borne in his time, 
within the limits of his owne kingdomes,or bordering them. Among whom thefe 
hereafter written were of greateft fame, JViebe, Laodemia, and \^Alcmena the wife of 
Amphitryon, by whom he had Pelafgus, Sarpedon, Argu-s, and Hercules :by Taygete 
hehad Taygetus,oi' whom the mountaine Taygetm tooke name, with another fbnne 
m called Soon, of whom Sauona : by ^Antiope he had ^Amphion and Zetus • by L&cU> 
Cafiorcr Pollux, Helen & Clytemnefira : by Danae Per [em : by Jordana Deucalion : by 
Charme (the daughter of Ettbulm) Brit oniart is, by Protogeniahe had AtUius thefa- 

'j therof Endymion ; andby/tf (the daughter of Jnachpu) Epaphus , the Founder of 
CWemphis in tAigypt : which Epaphus married Lybia, of whom that Countrie tooke 
namc,fbrfb the Greekes afterward called ^Africa. He rauifhed tAgina,thc daugh- 
ter ofts£/bpitf, and carried her into the Iflandoenopia or Oenotria , afterward called 
ts£gina,on whom he begat *Aiacus: by Torrhebia he had ^Archefdaus and Carbius: by 
Or a Colaxes : he had alio Dardanus by Elecira, who built Dardanium, afterward llum 
and Troy. Hce begat the brothers Taltci , on Thalia , and on Garamantis Hiarhas, 
Hee had belides thefe (if they belie not their chiefe God ) Phileus and Pilum- 
mis, inuentors of Bakers craft ; and I know not how many more ; burlknow^wejl 
that hee could not bee father tojilljhefejwho w^rebornejrugeifofirre diffe- 

40 ""I 7 And~oTthefehis feuerall rauifhments, betrayings, ftealing away of mens 
wiues, daughters and fbnnes, buying of virgins, and the likecameinall thofe anci- 
- cntfablesofhistransformationsintolliowersofgold,Eagles,Buh,birds,andbeafts; 
and of him, and by him (ineffeft) all that rabble of Grecian forgeries. And yet 
did not the Greekes and Romanes feare to entitle this monfter, Optimus Maximus, 
though Cicero in his fecond booke de natura Deorum affirme, that he defcrued no- 
thing lclfe. and in his Oration prodomo fua reprocheth Clodius forhisinceft,by the i U c,mficrif. 
name of Jupiter. His buriall was in Crete (faith Lucian) Cretenfes non folbn natum 
apudfe ry fipultum I o v e m tejlantur,fedetiamfepulchrum eius ojlendunt. The Cret- 
ans or Candians doe not onely auow that I v p i t e r. was borne and buried among them, but 

jo f "'y .[hew his graueandfepulcher : which Epiphanius alfbconfirmcth, for in his time 
there remained the monuments of his tombe in the mountaine Iafius. This Calli* 
machus in his hymnes alfb witnefTeth, but as offended thereat faith thus. 
T he Cretians cuer lyars were,they care not what they fay : 
For they a tombe haue built for thee, O King, that liu'ft alway. 

I 3 Diodorm 




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Diodoms Sicul&s telsby way of repor: from the Lybian fables, confirmed (as he 
faith) by ioffle Greeks wnters,that the originall of thefe Gods was from the weft erne 
parts of Africk. For there among the Atlantid& raigned one Vkaum (which figniiieth 
heauen) called Co for his great skill in Ajlrologie, and for his knowledge, and benefits 
to the people, honoured by them as a God after his death. He had by many wiues 
45 . fbnnes ; but by his principall wife Titea he had -17. fbnnesand two daughters, all 
which were called after their mothers name, the Titanes. Of 7/tazlikewifeitisfaid, 
that thee for her goodneffe was canonized as a GoddefTe, being dead, and called the 
Earth,as her husband was ftilcd Heauen. But ofall the children of 7V/«,her daugh- 
ter B.ifdea (which name founding asQuceneinEnglith, fheeis by the Latine tran- I9 
flator of Biodorm called Regifta) excelling the reft as farin verrucas inyeeres, was 
by generall content of her bretbren,and of the peOple,appointed to rule as Queene 
after her fathers death, being as yet a virgin. Shee tooke to husband her brother 
Hyperion, to whom fhee bare a fonne and a daughter, called Sun and Moone. The 
beautie and towardlinefle of thefe children mooued her brethren to enuie, and bred 
inthemafeareof being excluded from the fucceffion : wherefore they tooke the 
boy and drowned him in thenner Eridtnm^ now called Poe. The loffe ofthis childe 
caufed hisfifterto breake her owne neck • and the loffe of both her children made 
the mother to play many mad prankes,dancing with Cymbals,aftcr a wilde fafhion, ' 
in fight ofall the people, before whom fiVe is /aid to haue vanifhed away. Ere fhee % o 
dicdjher fonne (as the fable hath it) fignifiedvntoherinadreame, thathcandhis 
filter by the prouidence of God (hould become immortatl , that alfb the Sun and 
Moone Should be called by their names, and that their death iliould bereuen°ed 
vpon the murderers. According to which it isfaid, that the people did Co call thofe 
two Planets, and withall held herfelfe as a GoddefTe, and tearmed her the great mo- 
ther, which name they had formerly giucn tocher, for her motherly care in cheri- 
fliing her brethren whileft they were yong. Hyperion and hisrace being extingui- 
flied, the other fbnnes of Vramts diuided the kiflgdome. Of thefe Pittas and Sa- 
tow were chiefe. i_^f,f/,w raigned ouer the Countries lying about the mountaines, 
which afterward bare his name ; a iuft and wife Prince, deeply skilfull in Ajlrologie, -in 
and for inuentionof the Sphere iTiid to haue fupported Heauen . He had many 
fbnnes; but the principall of them called Hejperm^odn^of his fathers qualities and 
ftudies,wasfaid tohauebeene carried away by the winde, from the top of an high 
hill in themidft of his contemplations, and hisname in honour of him, impofedby 
the people vpon the morning ftarre. Thefeuen daughters of Atlas were alfb faid 
to haue beene excellent Ladies, who accompanying fuch as came to be deified,orr£- 
giftred among the Worthies, brought foorth children , anfwerable inqualitieto 
thofe that begat them. Ofthefeit is held,that thefeuen ftarrcs called Pleiades tooke 
name. Saturne the brother of Atlas raigned in Sialia,ipart of Africk and Ttdie. Iupiter 
another of the fonnes of Vrmw, raigned in Crete ; who hadtennc fbnnes which he a 
. called Curetes 5 he called that lland after his wiues name idea; in which lie he died, 
and was buried. But this iupiter rauft not haue beene that great one, butvncleto 
the great Iupiter, if thefe fables of the Lybians were true. Saturne (as thefe Lybians 
tell the tale (was a great tyrant, and fortified ftrong places, the better tokeepehis 
people in fubiection. His fifter Rhea was married to Hammon, who raigned infome 
part of Africk. Hammon louing others as well as his wife, or better, got a daughter/ 
called Minerua, neerc to the riuer Triton , who thereupon was called Tritonia. Hee 
alfb begat on Amalthea a fonne called Bacchus, whom he caufed fecretly for feare of 
his life to be brought vp at Nyfa, an iland'm the riuer Triton, vnder the tuition of his 
daughter Minerua, and certaine Nymphes. To Amalthea he gauein reward a goodly 50 
Countrie, that lay on the Seacoaft, bending in forme of a home, whence grew 
the tale of -rfwwfr^plentifullhorne.ftmous among the Poets. When if >fe heard 
thefe newes, fhe fled from her husband to her brother Saturne, who not onely en- 
tertained her as a fifter, but tooke her to wife,and at her inftigation made warre vpon 

Hammon 






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C h a p.(5. -S-f. o/V/^ Hijtoris of the World.- 



91 



ikmnton vanquifhed him by affiftarice of the Thanes, and made him flie into Crete. 
The Curetes, lnf iters children before mentioned, held the /land at -that time ; which 



was new 



v named Crete by Hammm;, after the name of Crate the K 









ings daughter, 
whom he tookc to wife, and bad with her (women as may fecmc being very grati- 
ous in thole times) thekingdomc. Sactbut was growne a proper yong man, had 
found out the making of wine, the art of planting trees, and many things elfe com- 
modious for mankinde , before the flight of his, mother in law. Now therefore 
hearing report of all that had happencd,and that Saturne was comming againft him 
with the Titanes ; Jielcuicdan Armie, to which the Amaz.onshxim^ not farre from 
10 Nyfa, added great forces, in loue of Minerua , whowasentrcd into their profeffi- 
on. So Bacchus leading the men, and Cifineruaihc women, they fet forward againft 

* Satin ;ie, met him , ouerthrew him, and taking many of the Thanes prifoners, retur- 
nedto Nyfa ; where pardoning the prifoners, that promifed to become liis"true fol- 
lowers, he pr&'parcd for a /econd expedition.' In the fecond expedition habehaued 
himfelfc fo well, that he wanne the loue of ail the people by whom' he paffed -info- - 
much that partly for good affection to him,partly in hatred of Satumes rigorous go- ■ 
. ucrnment, he was greatly ftrcngthened , and the encmie as much enfeebled by 
daily reuoltcs. Comming to the Cittie of Hammen, hewanneab.ittaileof Ja/ww, 
before the very wals. After which 'Saturne with his wife Rhcajjgd by night, letting 

,*o theTownconnretodefpight-tor-W.) But they were caught in their flight, par- 
doned bv Bacchus,and kindly entreated. Saturne hud a yong fonne by Rfm, called 
Jupiter. This childe Bacchm tooke with him in a great expedition that he made into 
the Eaft countries; and comming into *s£gyft, heleftthis Jupiter, being then a boy, 
gouernourof the'Couhtric 5 but appointed vnto him as an Ouerfeer, one Olympus, 
of whom Jupiter grew to be called olympius. Whileft Bacchus trauailed through all 
rations, as far as into 7»«'«,dooinggood in all places,and teaching many things pro- 
fitable to the life of man ; the Thanes had found out his father Hamrhon in Crete, and 
began to warrc vpon him. But Bacchus returned out of India ; with whom Jupiter 
from tAigyptyinA his fifter Afozw^together with the reft that afterwards were held 

3 o as Gods,ioining all their forces,went into CV<*,ouerthrew the Thanes, ch^cd them, 
, tookc,and flew thcm,and treed the world of them all . After all this,when Hammon 
and Bacchus were dead, they were deified ; and the great Iupiter the fonne of Saturne 
fucceeding them, raigned Lord alone oucr all the world, hauing none of the Thanes 
left aliue,nor any other to difturbe him. Betweene this tale of the LybianGods, and 
the Egyptian fables ofojiris, there is a rude refomblancc, that may caufe them both 
to be taken for the crooked images of fome one true hiftorie. For the expeditions 
of fir is, and of Bacchus ; the warrcs of the Giants in the one ftorie, of the Titanes in 
the other ; the kingdome o£*s£gypt giucn by Hercules Lybicus to Orus, by Bacchus to 
Jupiter, the rattles of ifis, and the Cymbals olBafilea, with many pcttie circumftan- 

40 ces,ncarely enough refemble each other, howfoeuer not alike fitted to theright 

perlbns. Sanchoniato (as Eufehius cites him) would haue all thefetobe Phoenicians, zM,u,\.rf 
and is earncft inlaying, that it is a true'ftorie, and no Allegoric. Yet he makes it 
feeme the more allegoricall, by giuing.to Vranus or Heauen for daughters , Fate and 
BedUtie, and thelikc, with addition of much fabulous matter, omitted by Diodorus, 
though Diodorus haue enough. To the genealogie he addes Elius or the Sun, as fa- 
ther of Vranus ; and among the children of Vranus, Iapetus,Bxtilus,znd Dagon, (whom 
Diodorus doth not mention by their names) giuing withall to Vranus the proper 
name of Terrenus or Indigent, and of illus to Saturne, but omitting Iupiter of Crete. 
The Pedigree of them is this. 

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ofCn am, *»</ wfer jjvttW *»«, -whereof fome gat t fome affected 
the name of Gods. 

F /«/>//«" Eelus,xbe fbnnedf Saturnus Bdhylonicus, otherwife 7^imro d, 

it feemeth that c««-« had not heard, (at leaft by that name) who was 

more ancient than any of -the former three by him remembred : for 

long after thefe times were the Greekesbut Saluages, if they leekeno 

farther off for their Gods. 

.Butthce^E^/iwMj euen after the fkrad, began (fbmewhat before this chaldtan 

Iupiter) tointitleC^ow, the parent of their ownc CWizraim, Jupiter Chammm , or 

Hammon. For the Etymologie of this word {Hammon) which the Greekes deduce 

*l>arew,fromtheJa»des t isridicuhvLS (tilth Pewer) ; neitheryet is his owne much 

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91 



better, who brings it from Hammxth, which fignifieth heate; becaufe the f lid Tem- 
ple otTupiter Hammon was feated in Lybia , where the ayre is exceeding hpte and 
fcortching. And as for the antiquitie of the latter Ittpiter (among the Greekes and 
Romans the raoft renowned) it is certain that he was borne not long before the war 
ofTrojfis by many of his fonnes is made manifeft ; namely, Caflor, Pollux, Hercules, 
Sarpedon , and others , which liued in that age of Priamn-s , vndcr whom, and with 
whom Troy was deftroied. 

Now feeing that mor tall men, and the moft wicked, were eftcemed immortall a- 
monethe Heathen ; itwas not to be wondred at,that Alexander Oll<tcedon,Tyberius, 
10 Nero, Caligula, and others foughtto be numbrcd among them, who were as defor- 
med monfters as the reft : For by whatreafbn cogjd the lame Veitie be denie d vnto 



ac>">£ 



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Lattrentia and JF/tfw, which was giucn to Vetm! feeing they were as notorious and £t- 
mgt£ harlots as flic was. 




\. VII. 

that the wifer of the ancient Heathen had farre better 
opinions of God. 

*o (p-aes^^s-ta Vt that cuer Pythagoras fit Plato, or Orpheus, with many other ancient 
^ -" and excellently learned, belieucdin any of thefe fooleries, it cannot 



befmWfed, though fame of them (ouerbufily) hauemixed their 
owriPmuentions with the Scriptures : for, in punifhment for their 
■ fictions, did Pythagoras hang both Homer and Hefwdus in Hell, where 
' heefaincd that they were perpetually flung and pinched with Serpents. Yet it can-, 
not be doubted,but that Homer had read oucr all the bookes of LMofes, as by p!aces 
ftelne thencc,almoflwordforword,may appcarc; of which lufiinecMartyr remem- 
breth many in that Trcatife conuerted by Mirandida. As for Plato, though he dif- 
fimbled in fomc things, forfeare of the inquifition of the Areopagites, yet S c Augu- 

3°y//»fhath already anfwercd for him (as before remembred) Etminficeijs delegatus 
est, qua de vno Deo tr adit after ant, <^£nd he was greatly delighted in the doitnne of one 
God, faith Iu(iine 'JMartyr. Now howfoeuer Laciant'ms pleafed to reprehend Plato, 
becaufe (futh he) Plato fought knowledge from the Egyptians , and the chald&ws, 
neglecting the lewes, and the bookes oi'Oitofes : Eufebius , Cyrillic , and Origen, finde 
reafon to beleeue thecontrarie , thinking that from thence he tooke the grounds of 
all by him written of God, or fauouring of Diuinitic : and the fame opinion had S 1 . 
Ambrofe of Pythagoras. 

But whetherit'wereoutofthefamevanitie, which poffeft all thofc learned Phi- 
lofbplv.Ts and Poets, that Plato alfo publifhed (not vnder the right Authors names) 

40 thole, things which he had read in the Scriptures 5 or fearing the fcueritie of the <^y£- 
reopagites, and the example of his Mailer Socrates , by them put to death by poyfon, 

y_ I cannot iudge. Justine Martyr . (as jt fecmcth ) afcribcth it wholly to Platees feare, 
whofe wordes among many other of the fune effect , arethefe; Plato Mosfs 
mentionem facere, ob id, quod vmCni fol;mui ? Deum docuerat , fibi aptid Athenicnfes Mum 
mn putauit, Veritas Areoj/agum ,Puto fearing the Areopagites thought it mtfafcj 
for htm among the Athenians to make mention of M o s e s , that he taught that there is but 
one God. But for that Diuinitie which he hath written in T 1 m ae o ; idipfum de Deo 
dif emit quoad" Most s.he difcourfed and taught the fame of God (faith lit [line Martyr) 
Which Moses did. For where it pleafed God by his Angell to anfwere Moses, 

5° Ego fumexistens (which is) lam ; and exijlens mi ft me advos, I am hath Jent me vnto 
you, herein did Plato (faith Iuftine CWartyr) no otherwife differ then that Utfofesvfcd 
the word (qui) and Plato the word quod : M o s e • s enim qui exiflit ( inquit ) Plato 
quod 'exi (lit. For Moses faith, He who is; Plato, That which is. Now of Gods in- 
comprehensible nature, and of the difficultie cither to concciue,or expreflc the fame, 

he 



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in Tim*o. he giueth rhis teftimonie : Genitorem Vniuerfitatis tarn difficile (fi inuenire, quam inuen- 
tum impofibile digne pro fart, It is as hard to finds out the Creatour of the Vniuerfall, as it is 
impoffble, if he were found, tofpeake of him worthily. And what can be more agreablc 

Ve Lcijb.j.io. to the Maieftie of Gods nature,then this propertie by Plato acknowledged ? Ileus bo- 
nus, (jr quidem, Deus caufa bonorum : malorum autem omnium nen caufa, God is abfolutely 
good, and fo ( affuredly ) the caufe of all 'that is good: but of any thing that is euill 'he is no 
caufeatall: and againe, charitas Dei fuit caufa fatfionis mundi , & originis omnium re- 
rum, The loue of God was the caufe of the worlds creating, and the original/ of all things. 
^Apulems the Platonift. Summits Deusinfinitus eB, nonfolum loci exclufwnefedetiam 
nature digmtate : Et nihil eft Deofmilius crgratius, quam viranimoperfetto bonus x The 
mo si high God is alfo an infinite God, not only by exclufwn of place, but lyThl dignitie of na- 
ture : neither is there any thing more like or more acceptable to God then a man of a perfect 
heart. Thales affirmed that God comprehended all thinges, and that God was of all 
thinges the moil ancient, quia nunquam ejfe ccepit, becaufe hee neuer had any beginning : 
Zeno , that God beheld euen the thoughts ofmen : Athenodorus , that therefore all 
men ought to bee carefull in the actions of their life , becaufe God was euery where 
prefent, and beheld all done. But what can be more agreable to CWofes ftorie of the 
creation, then this opinion and defcription of the worldes beginning in Euripides, 
Scholler oiAnaxagoras ? 

Ccelum terras <vnius fornix fuit : 
Sed cumfuiffent abiuncla amplexu mutua, 
Emerfit omnis in lucem res progenita, 
Ar bores, aues,fera, quaf% off ert more, 
Genuf£ mortalium. 

Heauen and Earth one forme did beare : ' 
But when difioyned once they were 

From mutuall embraces* 
All thinges to light appeared then, 
Of trees, birds, beafts, filhes, and men 

The ftill-remayning races. 



jbtto£enis. 



lO 



19 



30 



And as in Pythagoras,mSocrates,and m Plato: fo we finde the fame excellent vnder- 
flanding in Orpheus, who euery where exprefled the infinite and ible power of one 
God, though hee vfe the name oilupiter , thereby to auoide the enuie and danger of 
the time ; but that he could attribute thofe thinges to the Sonnes ofmen and mor- 
tall creatures, which he doth to this lupiter, there is no man who hath euer heard of 
God, that can imagine. 

TQmma Deorum (faith Mirandula) quos Okvhzvs canit, non decipientium dx.mo- 40 
num, a quibus malum & non bonumprouenit -^fednaturalium virtutum diuinarumfc funt 
nomina, The names of thofe Gods whom Orphevs dothfing,are not of decerning Deuils, 
from whom euill comes, andnot goodneffe; butthey are the names of natural! and diume 
■vertues. Yea that heyet reacheth higher, and fpeaketh of God himfelfe, this his in- 
ftruction to Muf&rn, and the Hymne following teach vs. Re/piciens verb addiuinum 
huncfermonem ei diligent er animum aduertejntendens cordis ration is capax concept actdum: 
reel am autem afcende viam, ejrfolum a/pice mundi Regem. Vnus eli exfegenitm , ex eo 
omnianatafimt : Ipfe vero in tllis verfatur, necquifquam eum intueripoteft mortalium, fed 
ipfe nihilominus omnesmtuetur. 



T hen marking this my facred fpeech, but truly lend 
Thy heart, that's reajons fphere, and the right way afcend, 
And fee the worlds fole King. Firft, he is fimply one 
Begotten of himfelfe, from whom is borne alone 



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. , I, ■ ■ 1 1 ■ " '* "" " ' " ' m """ r " " 

C h a *-6$-7' °f* he Ht P orie °f the WorlA ' 

All clfe i in which hees ftill, nor could it ere befall 
A mortall eye to fee him once, yet he fees all. 

And againe the fame Authour. _ fc.--.-j 

I v p i t e r. ommpotens, & primus, & 'vltimus idem ; 
I v p Vt e r <?// a*p'#/ d* medium : I o v i s <w?#w *»«»*»; 
I v p i t e a eftfundamen humi ejrftellantis Olympi. 
Ivpiter & mas eft, &faemina nefciamortis. 
Spirit us eft cunciis, validi vis I v v i t e r ignis. 
X B P<r% jW/x, S o-l, L v n a <?# I v p i t e r. ipfe 

Hex, & origofimul rerum eft, ejr terminus idem. 
Namprius occduit, magnopost numine,facrum 
Cor refer ans bonus in dnlcem dedit omnia, lucem. 

The firlWall is God, and the fame raft is he. . 
God is the head and midft, yea from him all things be, 
God is the Bafe of earth, and of the ftarred skie. 
He is the male and female too, (hall neuer die. 
The fpirit of all is God,the Sunne, the Moone 
20 TheKing, th'originall of all, of all the end. 

Forclofe in holie brefthe all did comprehend, 

Whence all to bleffed light, his wondrous power did fend. 

Now befides thcie former teftimonies , that allthelearned men of ancient times' 
were not foftupid and ignorant, as the Egyptians, Grecians, and other Nations by 
them infected were , I will only rcpeate two or three other opinions , and 1 cauc the 
Reader to thofe large and learned Collections of Iustine CMartyr , Clemens, Lactan- 
tiw,Euf}bJus,Eiigub!nus,Peucer,Plefits,Danxus,an^^^ For clcanthes the Stoick,\ 

being demaunded of what nature God was , defcribed him by thefe attributes and 

30 properties. Bonu5,iifttis,fancJiis,feipfumpoftidens,'vtilis,J}eciofm,optimus ,feuerus, 
liber, femper commodus, tutus, gloriofus, chtritas, &c. Good,iaff, holy,poffefing himfelfe, 
profitable, beautiful!, befi,feuere, free, alwaies doing good, fife withoutfeare,glorious, and 
felfe-charities. Epicharmus affirmed , that God who belseld all things , and pierced 
euery nature, was only and euery where powerf ull : agreeing with Democritus. Rex 
omnium ipfe Jfolus , He is the only King of dl Kings ; and with Pindarus the Poet ; Beus 
■vnus, Pater, creator fummus, at que optimus artifex , quiprogrefusfingulis dmerfos fecun- 
dum merit aprxbet, One God, the Father, the most high creatour, and beft artificer, whogi- 
ueth to euery thing diners proceedings according to their deferts. This God (faith Antis- 
t h e n e s) cannot be refembled to any thing, and therefore not elfewhere knowne , Nifiilf 

' a patria illaperenni , cuius imaginem nitllxm habes , Smie only in thai euerlasting countries-, 
whtfe image thou haft none at all. Hereof alio Xenophanes Co lophonivs. 
Vnus Deus inter Dcos & homines maximus, nee corpore,nec mente mertdibus fimhis, There 
is one God among Gods and men most powerful!, neither corporally., nor mentally likes vnto 
mortals : and X e n o p h o rt, Beus qui omnia quatit , & Omnia qmefcerc facit , magnus 
potenfrj { , quod omnibus patet : qmlis autem forma fit, neminipatet, nifipfifl', qui lucefua. 
omniaperluftrat, Godwhofiaketh alt things, andfetteth all things at reft, is great andmigh- 
tie, as is manifest to all: but of what forme he is, it is mamfeft to none faue only to hmfelfe i 
ivho ilkminateth all things with his owne light. Finally, Plato faith , Tottus rerum nature 
caufit, 6" ratio, & origo Deus,fummus animigenitor , aernusanimantium fofpitator, aftw 

5° dims mundifui opifex, fine propagation genitor,neque loco,neque tempore vllo comprenfus, 
eog.paucis cogitabilis,nemim effabilis, God is the amfe,ground,Andonginallofthe whole na- 
ture of things, the moft high Father ofthefoule, the eternal! preferuer oflming cre.it ures,the 
continudlftamer of his world, a begetter without any propagation, comprehended neither in 
any place, nor time ; therefore few can conceiue him in thought, none em expreffe wha * he is. 

There- 



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*Vd«» m C>m ' Therc ^ orc was lt f aid by S l . H 1 e R. o m e , Si enim cunctos Philofophorum reuoluas U- ■ 
(if. ""' " '"*" ^ros, necejje eft vt in eis reperias aliquant partem vaforum Dei, vtapud Piatone u,fa- 
hricatorem mundi, Dettm : apud Zinonem Stoicorum Principem, inferos & immorta- 
les ammas, &t. if thou confider all the hookes of the Philofopbers , thou canst not butfnde 
in them fome fart of the Ve^els of God, asm Plato, God the creatour of theirorld : in 
Zeno Prince of the Stoicks, Jjell andmmorta/l fides, drc. Andthisis ccrtaine that • 
if we looke into the wifedome of all ages, wee fhall lindc that there neucr was man 
of folid vnderftanding or excellent Judgement : ncuer any man whofe mindc the art 
of education hath not bended; whofe eyes, i fooliih fuperftition hath not afterward - 
blfe3ed; whole apprehenfions are fober, andbyapenmieinfpcftionaduifed; but'io 
that he hath found by an vnrefiftable neceffitie,one true God,and cuerlaftingbcing, 
all for euer caufing, and all for euer fuftaining ; which no man among the Heathen 
hath with more reuerence acknowledged, or more learnedly expreft, then that *s£- 
gyftim Hermes,howfocuer it failed afterward in his poftcritie • all being at length by 
deuilifh pollicie of the tfj^Kdb purpofely obfeured ; who inucnted new • 
$fi Gods, and thofe innumerable, belt totting (asthe Deuill perfwaded them) with 
vulvar caparities,,3nd fittefl to keepe in awe and order xheir commonpeople. 






10 




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$. VMI. 

That Heathenifme and Iudaifme, after many wounds were at length about thefam<u> 
time under Ivl i an miraculoujly confounded. 

Vt all thefe are againe vanifhed: for the indentions of mortallmerj 
are no leffe mortall then themfelues. The Firc,which the chddlms 
worfhippcdfor a God, is crept into euery mans chimney \ which the 
lacke of fewell Itaruerb, water quencheth , and want of aire fuffoca- 
teth \. Jupiter is no more vexed with Iunoes ieloufies ; Death hath per- 
iwaded him tochaftitie, and her to patience; and that Timewffich hath deuoured • 
ltielfc , hathalfo eaten vp both the bodies and images'oTKfm and his • yea their 3Q 
ftately Temples of ftonc and durefull Marble. The houfes and fumptuous buil- i 
dings erefted to Baal, can no where bee found vpon the earth ; nor any monument 
ofthat glorious Temple confecrated to Liana, There are none now in Phoenicia, 
that lam ent the death of ^Adonis ; nor any in Lybm, Creta, Thefalia , or elfewhcre, 
that can aske counfaik or helpe from Jupiter The great God Pan hath broken his 
Pipes , ^polloes Priefts arc become fpeechleffc ; and the Trade of riddles in Ora- 
cles, with the Deuils telling mens fortunes therein, is taken vp by counterfait C£7y- 
ptians,zndcoiirmmgAftro{ogers. 

rJ L^4fy$?$£ waslon % erethe Deui11 8 aue wa y t0 thefe his ouerthrowes and difho: 

n&urs .-for after the Temple of Apollo at Delphos (one ofhis chiefe Manlions) was 40 
many times robbed/burnt, and deftroyed; yet by his diligence the famewasoften 
enriched, repaired, and reediiied againe, till by the hand of God him/elfe it receiued 
the laft and vtter fubuerfion. For it was firft robbed of all the Idols and ornaments 
therein by the Eubwan Pyrates : Secondly , by the Phlegians vtterly iackt : Thirdly 
by Pyrrhus the Sonne of Achilles : Fourthly, by the Armie of ' Xerxes : Fiftly , by the 
Captaines of the Phocenfes : Sixtly, by ifero^ who carried thence fiuehundred bra- 
zen images : all which were new made, and therein againe fetvp at thecommon 
C )Ch ? ut what f° euer was gathered bctweene the time of ground Con/lantine, 
the Ghnftian Armie made fpoile of, defacing as much as the time permitted them ; 
notwithitanding all this it was againe glorioufly rebuilt , and fo remained till fuch < 
lime as itdun .the Apoftata fent thither to know the fucceffe ofhis Parthian cnter- 
|>nie,at which timeit was vtterly burnt and confumed with fire from Heauen; and 
loftrntheeartlJ'' ^^ himfeIfe > andallthcrcftof ^eW^^^a molten downe and 

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C h a p.6.§.p. of the Btjtork of the World, 

The like fucccffe had the /«m in the fime luhans timc,when by his pcrmiffion 
theyaflemb-cd themfelues to rebuild the Temple V&mmfilm .for whik thev 
werebuned to lay the foundations, their buildings wcreouerthrowne by an Earth 
quakcand many thoulands of the Mmwerc ouerwheltned withtherumes and 
others flame and fcattered by tempeft and thunder I though ^i m . ou^S^Jk 
porutmorefauourablyforthe^m, afcnbmgthis to the nature of that element" 
For, faith he Mjpus and the Ruler oftheProuince of a*,, bein R b v /Sl , 

tion, and oft confuting the workemen, made the enterprife fruftrate. ' 



91 



f.I. 






\- ix. 



Of the UU refuges of the Deuillt* mdntdne his Kingdom*. 







' u f Deu ' 11 V b f 1ufe he J ? nnot P% vpontheopenfiaaeof this 
world (as mthofc dayes) and being Mlli indubious as euei find es 
it more for hisaduantage to creeponto themindes of men • 'and in! 

*<*•*• y^L&ml adoration of himfelfe then euer. For whereas hec firft nuvhr 
2 o hem to lacnhcctoMonfters, todcad Hones cut into faces of beaft £rd So 

tier miXtTTaturesihee now fees before them the high and fcSwK i • 
; f/-~ dinglmageofbr^ 
. delft of dangers and opprcffions : that chafetie is the enemie of «S j,7" 

that as all vertue (,n general!) is without talk • fo KSTieS^ ft 

eueryfenfe.-fortruewifedome (faith he) is««d/Sln SSeS^ ■ Y^ 

mens foules, that he will accept them at an v time II, F at neede of 

forvs C 1 I i arb ' § crs of moftfcarefulland tembleforrow) ftayW 

gent . io >shenowmorelaborioustheneuer.-thelongdayof 
mankindednwingfafttowardsaneuening, ancj 

the worlds Tragcdie and : 

timeneareatati 

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Chap. VII. 

0/Noahs Floud. 



Of Gods fore-warning : and Come humane testimonies : and fome doubting 
touching the truth ofN o a h s F loud. 

F this deftru&ion ic pleafed God to giue warning vn- 
to Noah : who (faith lojephusj fearing to perifh among 
the reft ,fecedens cumfuis indium regionem migrauit, 
He departedwith his children , and trauailed into another 
Region. And of thefe Giants from whom Noah with- 



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J drew himfelfe , #w/«/writeth in this manner, Tto 
they exceeded in all forts of inhumane and vnnaturailwic- 
kedneffe , and that they Were contemf tores & religionis 
& Deorum , contemners of religion and of the Gods : a- 19 
mong which mightie men (faith Berofus ) vnm erat 
qui Deorum vencrantior, ejrprudentior cunttis, &c. huh 
nomenerat Noah, There wo* one more wife andreuerencing the Gods then therein 
who fe name mNoah: who with his three fonnes Sem , laphetus, and Cham , and 
with their wiues, and the wife of Noah, (namely Titea the great, P andora,N^ela,and 
Noeda) preferued themfeluesin the Arke. This Arke God commanded N£ah to 
prepare : ^AndGodfaid-vnto No Xh, make thee an Arke of pine trees. -thou Jhalt make 
tabids inthe Arke, and [halt pitchit -within , andwithout, with pitch. For God made 
w^toknowthatanendofallfleihwasathand, and that thcgrauesoftherebelh- 
oUs and cruell generations were already fafhioned in the cloudes which foone after go 
fhould fwallow vp and couer all liuing creatures, which breathed in the aire : -Noah 
and his familie excepted. i . . . 

But this vniuerfall grauc of waters , and generall delugehath not beene receiued 
by all • for diuine teftimonies doc not perfwade all naturall men to thofe things , to 
iaH ■nTuTA which their owne reafon cannot reach : dum obuoluta in obfcuroveritaslatet whikB ; 
^|. ? . »,? the truth' lyeth wrapped vp in obfmi^. Many there are who hauedifputedagainft 
Wp ^SH^ 1 .0 tHe'vSlsSkcfthis ouerflowTng , and haue mdged that this floud of ^ fell 
but on fome particular places and Kingdomes : moued fo to thinke, becaufe in elder 
ages there haue beene many other floudes (as they fuppofe) of that nature. Hercor 
Mcholaus Damafcenuswntcth in this manner.ashis wordes arc cited by I o s e p h vs. 43 
U efM u.,, A . EB fuper Minyadamexcelfusmonsin Armenia, quiBarisappel^ 
s»jeUe m . ■ ^ r erm0 e a d ,hw< tempore liberatos , &quendamfimidin ^ircadeueEtum mhutus 
**** verttcehdffeMnmmirelltqummultotemporeconferuata^ 

etiam Moses "ludtorum Legator fcribit : thusfarre this Authour. Thereis (faith 
he) aboueiMmyada (or the Countrie of Miny*) an exceeding high Mountainem^fr- 
mLia,ca/MBaris : onwhichitisreported,thatmanyhauingfedthitherwerefauedinthe 

time of the delude : and that one was carried m an Arke, andrefled vpon the toppeej the; 
mountaine,wherconthereremainedalongtime after certain* peeccs thereof, andthis might 
bethe (arne,ofwhrch Moses the Law-giuer of the Iewesmaketh mention .And ofth.s 
opinion were the ThalmudiBs (faith Annius) that many Giants fiucd themfelues 50 

vpon Mount Syon. . , r , , 

But Berofas (whoafter jV/^wasoneofthcmoftancient, howfocucrheehaue 
beene fince deformed and corrupted ) doth in the fubftance of all agree with Mojes 
as touching the generall floud, taking from thence the beginning ofhisHiitone in 



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C h a p. 7.^.2. c/^<e Hiftorie of the World. 

thefe words, ^yinte aquarum cladem famofam, quavniuerfrs perijt Orbis &c . Before 
that famous definition of Waters, by which the World Vmuerf all periled : witneffing 
withall , that Noah with his wife Titea, and his three formes with their wiues (in all 
eight perfons) were onely faued. 



$. II 

Of the fiend in the time of Ogygzs : and that this was not 
Noahs floud. ' 



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Vt from the vanity of the Greekes, the corrupters of all trulh {faith 
Laciantius) who without all ground of certainty vaunt their Antiqui- 
tie, came the crrourfirft of all : who therein flattering them/clues 
alfo, fought to periwade the world, that there was no floud preceded 
the floud of Ogyges^xxv^ of the Thebans in Ba-etia, or rather of Attica ■ 
and therefore iaith Rhodogmus Ogygiiimidappe/lant.Po'eta , tanquampeructus dixeris 
ab Ogyge -vetufiifimo. The Poets gone the name ofO ovgiaw things exceeding an* 
dent, as of O g y g e s the most ancient. 
But let Ogyges be as ancient as thofe men can make him, yet it is manifeft,that he 
ao liuedbutin Iacobstime (though Eufebius makes him later, and in Mofes time), and tafebM pn^ 
was borne 67. yeares aftcrhim. There is alfo anorjinion,_that_Og^j was Cadmus ""< n &- l >- '°> 
(and then was he farre later) as Rhodogmus in the nintH booke of his antiquities re- e«.«, 
membreth .■ funt tamen qui WiA-gyptoregnaJfe autument htmc : vndejit Caomvs 
qui in Graiam profeclus Thebas condidit, a boue iugulato fie nuncjipatas ; quonum Syro- 
rumlingua bos dicitur Thebe. There are ( faith hee ) who thinke that this Ogyges did. 
rtugnem v£gypt, whereby he jhetddbe Cadmv s,who traueling into Greece ■built Thebes 
fo named of a bet fe flame : becaufe in the Syrian language a beefe is called 'Thebe. 

But this floud of OgygesfcW'm the yeare of the world 3 440. according to Eufe- 
bius, who followed the account of the Septuagint : and the floud of Noah in the yeare 
30 2142. after the fame account ; and fo there came 1 200. yeares betwecne thefo 
flouds, wanting but two, though heerein £«/<>&« was much miftaken, and corrected 
this opinionin his chronologic. Now although the very yeare and time of this ouer- 
flowing in Achak, orrather Attica, benotprajcifelyfetdownc'but that there is a 
great difference among writers, yet whofoeuer makes it moft ancient, findes aboue 
503. yeares difference betwecne that and the generall floud. 

For Pauks Or^affirmes,that this tempeft fell vpon the Atheniansbat 1040. tl.i.ca.f, 
yeares before Rome built. BuchoUerus faith it was 1 043. elder then Rome; which 
was founded (according to the fame Buchok-erus) in the worlds yeare 3219: though 
after the account which I follow (and whereof I will giue my reafons in the ftoric of 
40 Abraham) it was built in the worlds yeare 3280. Now the generall floud prece- 
ded the building of Rome (faith Buchokerus) 1 5 6 3. yeares : and the floud of Ogyges 
(asbefore) 1043. Hence it fblloweth by eafie calculation, that (if he place Ogyges 
m his true age) the difference betweene rhefe two flouds muflbe 520. yeares, to 
which we (allowing oo.morc) finde 580. And that this of Ogyges was not the fame 
of Noah (except we call Noah Ogyges pr feus, as fome doe) it appeares by this , that Xenopbm.A*. 
the floud of Ogyges then king of Attica or Ogygia,6ii not extend it felfc any further »«»'»• 
then the bankes of ' Archi-pelago, or the ^Aigcean Sea. For whereas ^tela, Plime, and U da li 
Solinus witneffe,that the Cittic of loppc in lud.ta was founded before the floud ; and Ttm.n.l' 
that ( notwithftanding the waight of waters) there remained on certainc Altars SoU " 47 ?, 
50 offtone the title of the King, and of his brother Phrneus, with many of the X#«™ 
grounds of their religion :fure, it is no where found among prophane Hiftoriarrs *' 1 "' w ^ 
nor in' the fcriptures, that euer the floud of Ogyges fpread . t felfe ouer any part of Sy- ££ *££ 
ru, much lefieouer all the earth. But that it drowned both the Regions of Attica rumemditum, 
about Athens, and that of Ach.tia in Peloponnefus, it is very probabfe. For it fee- s °''" Md - 

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meth that at that time it was, when Helice and Bunt, were fwallowed vp (Citties 
feated on the North part of Peloponncfus ) of which Omd. 

Si quAras Helicxn, cjr Bur tin, Achaides vrbes, 
Inuenies fub aquis. 

Bura and Helice on A chaian ground 

Are ibught in vainc, but vnder lea arc found. 



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Of this floud of og^« was inuented the fable of Apollo and Diana. For Zrfww x & 
the daughter of Coeus, the fonne of 77/<?», being beloued and forced by Jupiter, and 
by him gotten with childe,/«w thereat enraged permitted her (as they fay) no part 
■of the earth to be dcliuered on \ and withall caufed the monftrous ferpent Python 
to follow and affright her, wherefoeuer me trauailed, till at length arriuing at the 
Ik of Ortygto (he was there receiued i in which (he was dcliuered, firft of Diamond 
then of Apollo, being Twinnes ; whereof Barlaam makes this expofition : That at 
iuch time as the deluge (which happened in Ogyges his raignc) ccafed, out of the 
abundant moifture of the earth (heat by putrefaction being thereto mixed) there 
were exhaled fuch thicke mills and fogges, that in Attica, and along the coafts of 
the *Algean lea, neither the beames of the Sunne by day, nor of the Mooncby 2Q 
night could pierce theayer,orbeperceiued by rheinhabitants:fo as when at length 
- (the earth being dried, and thefe vapours diffipatcd) the ayer began to be cleare, 
and the people of Ortygia efpied the light of the Moone /omewhat before day, and' 

Tfm.m-ct.rt. and m thc & me morning the Sunne alfo appeared : fabuloufly (becaufe Diana. 
repraefented the Moone, md Apollo the Sunne) they were reported to be borne 
in the//? of Ortygia thereof afterwardes called Deles : which fisnifieth manife- 
ftation. 

• And furely it is not improbable, that the floud of Ogyges, being Co great, as Hi- 
ftories haue reported it, was accompanied with much alteration of the ayre feniibly 
difcemed in thofe parts, and fome vnufuall face of the skies. Vane in his bookes De ? o 

Mg.iem.dci gentepopuliBemani(ashe is dtedby S.AuguJiine) reporteth out of Caftor, thatfo 
greata miracle happened in the ftarre of Vemsjis neuer was feene before,norin after 
times : For the colour, the greatne(fe,the figure, and the courfe of it, were changed. 
This fell out as Adraftus Cyucenus, and Dion JS[eapolites, famous Cfrlathematicians af- 
firmed in the time of Ogyges. 

Now concerning the courfe of that or any other planet, I doe not remember,that 
I haueany whereread, of fo good Aftrologers flourilhing among thc Greekes,or e\fc ■ 
where in thofe daies as were likely to make any calculation of the reuolutions of 
the i>Z*##.f lb exaft, thatitfliould neede no reformation. Ofthccolourand mag- 
nitude. Ifeenoreafon why the difference found in the ftarre of Venus (houldbce 40 
held miraculous ; confidering that lelTer miftes and fogges, than thole which coue- 
red Greece with (b longdarkneffe doe familiarly prefcnt our fenfcs,with as great alte- 
rations in the Sunne and Moone. Thatthefigure Ihould vary, queftionleffe it was 
very ftrange : Yet I cannot hold it any prodigie : for it ftands well with good rcafon, 
that the fide of Venus which the Sunne beholdes, being enlightened by him, the op. 
pofitehalfefhouldremainefhadowed ; whereby that Planet, would vnto 'ourcies^ 
defcrying onely that part whereon the light fallcth, appcare to bee horned, as the 
Moone doth fame ; if diftance (as in other things) didnothinderthcapprehenfion 
ofourfenles. 

GaliUus, GaliUus, aworthy Ajlreloger now lmin%,\vhoby thehcipeofperfpecliue 50 
glalTes hath found in the ftarres many things vnknown to the ancients, arhrmeth fo 
much to haue beene difcouered in Venus by his late obferuations. Whether (bmc 
waterie difpofition of the aire might prefent as much to them that liued with Ogyges 
& GaltUus hath feene through his inftrument ; I cannot tell: lure I am, thatthedif 

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C h a v.J '§.7, . ?/^ Hifioris of the World. 



101 



couerie of a truth formerly vnknowne, doth rather conuince man of ignorance,then 
nature oferrour. One thing herein is worthy to be noted, that this great, but par- 
ticular floud of Ogyges, was (asappearethby this of S t .Augufline) accompanied 
with iuch vnufuall (and therefore the more dreadfull, though naturall) femes tefti- 
fying the concurrence of caufes with effects in that inundation; whereas the floud 
of Noah which was generall and altogether miraculous , may feemc to hauc had no 
other token, or forelhewing, then the long preaching of Noah himfelfe , which was 
not regarded : forthey were eating and dnnking,when the floud came fodainely,and i»kf i7.?.*r, 
tooke them all away. 



10 




£. III. 

O/DevcUiohs floud: and that this was w/Noai|s floud : nor the fmbri in 
It die a remnant of any witter fall floud. 

Second floud of great fame, and of which the time is more certaine, 
I was that of Deucalion in Thefldia, of which S. <^iugufline out ofvarro. 
> His temporibm (vt V a r r o fcribitjregnante Athemenfibus C s. a n a Oj 
\fucceffore Cecropis (vt autem noflri, Evsebivs 0" Hi erony- 
20 <trw>sm^^e>^i MVS ^ A dhuceodem G$cv.oi>EpermanenU,diliiuiumfuit, quod appella- 
tum est Deucalion is ; (that is) In thefe times (as V a r r o reporteth) Chanavs the_^> 
fucccjfour (fCzcR.ors gouerningthe Athenians , vr (as our Evsebiv s and H 1 e- 
«om EjayJ C e c & o r s yet luring, that floud ( called Deucalions) happened. 

And in the beginning ofthe eleuenth Chapter of the fame eighteenth Booke, he 
vfeth thefe wordes. Eduxit ergo Moses ex tAlgypto populum Dei nouifiimo tempore 
Cecropis Athenienfium Regis , cum apud Afjyrios regnaret Ascatades, apud 
Sicyonios Marathvs, apud Argiuos T r 1 o p A s. Moses led the people of 'God out 
vftAEgypt about the latter times of C e c a ops King of the Athenians , Ascatades 
raigning ouer the AfJ'yrians , oner the Sicyomans Marathvs, and oner the Argtues 
30 T r 1 o r a s : fo as leauing the curiofitie of a few yeares, more or leffe, it appeareth, 
. that this floud ofDeucdion was either at the egreflion ofthe children ofjfrael out of 
ty ^S)f t i or nea r e it •' and then after Nj>ah 753. yeares , according to Functius , who 
makes cecrops toliue in the yeare ofthe world 2 409. or if wc follow OMercator, then 
73o.yearesafter:?vW;,andintheyeare of the world 2395. Butif Deucahonwexc 
bornein the age ofthe world 2356. according to Codoman ; then giuing vnto Deuca- 
Hon fourtieyeares of age when this floud happened , it falleth within one yeare of 
Mercators account. But Deucdionby allapprouedHiftorians is /aid to bauebeene 
82 . yeares old at that time. Now Clemens Alexandrians dates the time of this floud 
ofDeucdion, and the conflagration and burning in Phaetons time, by theraigneof 
40 Crotopus King ofthe ^Argiues ; but Crotopus liued King ofthe Argtues fixe yeares af- 
ter i/™?/departed ^£gypt,which makes twentie yeares difference according to Fun' 
Ctius , who will haue this floud and burning to hauc fallen fourteene yeares before 
Mofes left v£gypt : for hee gaue of the worldes yeares to the floud and burning the 
yeare 2 44o.and to Mofes his egreflion the yeare 2454. And yet Cedrenus thinks that 'cedm.ij.fyx 
tMofes was more ancient, and liued with inachus • but that cannot be true : for then 
had the floud of Deucalion.find the burning of P-W/^preceded the floud of Ogyges, 
which is denyed by all : for that of Thefldie (called Deucdions) followed that of At* 
tica (called Ogygia) at leaft 250. yeares or thereabouts. Eufdws'm his chronologies 
makes it 2 3 o. and fo doth P. Oroflus .- Eitfebins about the 5 o. yeare of Mofes life, and 
jo Cyrillus about the 67. and both after Noahs floud 7 70. yeares : for thefe bee Clcmgni 

i^Alexandrinns his wordes. Fuit autem in Gratia tempore quidem Ph oho ne i, qui ckm.Attxt' 
firit post I n a c h v m, inundatio qua fuit tempore Ogygis, There happened in Greece in the ?"•'* &<:/. " 
time ofP h o r o n e v s, who liued after Inachvs,A floud of Ogyges. Now if the 
floud of Ogyges in ^Attica were 1020. or 10 1<5. yeares before the firft olympiad, ac- 

K 3 cording 



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cording to Eujebim and 0r«/5W ; (as before) then is it manifeft, that taking 763 .out 
■of this number of 1 020.it fills out that Ogyges floud happened before the Hebrewes 
left i*£gypt 250. ycares, or 2 co. yeares, according to the difference bet weene the 0- 
iufth. in chm. pinions olEujebim and Orojius. And for my felfe (who rather follow thole chrono- 
logers, which giuc do. yeares more to ^Abraham after the floud, then the reft) I rec- 
kon the times which come betweene thefe flouds in this fort. The generall floud 
wasin the yeare of the world i6$6.lacob\vas borne in the yearc of the world 2 169. 
fo as from the beginning of the floud to lacobs birth there were confumed 513. 
yeares. Ogyges floud happened 1 00. yeares after Jacob was borne ; and therefore af- 
ter the generall floud <5i 3. yeares. Now Deucalion was borne in the yearc of the 1 o 
world 2356. and hadliued 82. yeares, whenhisKingdomeof TheJ/die was ouer- 
whelmed ; (which added to 2 3 5 6. make 2438) his floud was after Ztyahs floud en- 
ded 782. yeares. And hereto ^#»//« his Xw///w?agreeth, who makes 7oo.ycares 
betweene the generall floud and Deucalions birth ; to which adde 82 . yeares of his 
age(asbefore)and then the floud of ThcJJalie followed thegenerail 782.yeares.The 
wordesofthatJT«&^fl# are thefe. Ab mundatione terrarumadortum Devcalionis, 
fecundo anno Sphmfeptingentifupputantur anm,qm natus annos duos & offoginta Thef- 
faliam vidit immdatam , From the drowning of the world to the birth o/Devc*lion, 
in thefecondyeare ofsphwus , arenumhred 700. yeares , andwhen Devcaliq^ was 
82. yeares old, he J aw Theffdm drowned. This floud happened in the winter time a- ao 
bout Parnaffus : witnefTe Arijietle'm the firftofhis LMeteors. And Varro { whom S c . 
^e'V'faf fo often ateth for his excellent lea rning , efpecially in antiquities) findeth - 
this floud of 'Deucalion to haue happened intEetime of Cranaus, whofocceeded Ce- 
-crops: Orofiutthirkcs it fome what later, i_Amphitryonraignmg in Athens, thcthird 
from Cecrops. Onely this of Deucalion was very great , and reached not only ouer 
Theffalie it felfe , and the Regions adioyningWeftward ; but it couered the greateft 
part of Italic : and either the fame, or fome other particular floud then happening 
oppreft t^Esy/tf, faith Eujebias. And therefore did the Greekes eitherthinke it , or 
faineittobevniuerfall; and Deucalion, then King, failing himfelfe and fome others 
on the mountaines of T/fe/^//!? (of all other the higheft, IkithSolmus) wasbyreafon 30 
thereof (as Strabo witneffeth) faidtobethepreferuerofmankinde. Thatthis floud 
couered a great part of Italie, Plmie and Solinus make it probable : who affirme that 
the people then inhabiting Italic were therefore called i^ t iti : quia ab imbribus diluuij 
fuperfuiffent; and therefore alfo were they efteemed the moft ancient Nation, as 
Strabo confirmeth in his firft Booke, and Trezenius in his fecond : which Vmbri thefe 
Authours make the Parents of the Sabmes, and the Sabines to bee the Parents of the 
Samnites, Piceni, Lucani, Srutij., and all others inhabiting anciently the bankes of the 
O^lediterraneSez. But that thdeVmbri were not the inhabiters of //*&• before the 
floud of 2{oah , and fo tooke name by fauing themfelues vpon the Appenine moun- 
tafnes, the Scriptures teach vs:lhewing who, and who only then were preferued, 40 
which is fufficient. Report hath aduenturedfurther,tellingvs that the firft people 
Atbmtusiriftu. which after thegenerall floud inhabited italie, were -the Camefenes ; (fo named from 
/ofM.ij.outof Cme f e ^ w hom Catoinorigmibus, another o£Annius his Authours names for a con- 
Sit"tiiac F c"! fort of lanus) which people liucd altogether a fauagelife; till fuch time as Saturnt 
mefe was the ar ri u i n g on thofe coafts, deuifed lqwes to gouerne them by : the memorie of whole 
I»« "* fift " afts in ^ Region Diodor and Thallus among the Greekes, Nepos Cafius and Varro a- 
LaSJ.i'.c.i3. mong the Latines haue preferued ; and of whom Virgil ; 



Strnbs.l.9. 

F/M./.3.C.14. 
Solc-j. 
Pfo. ibid. 



JEti.l.%.%\$. 



Trimus ab xthereo vmit Satvrnvs Olympo, 
\^irma I o v 1 sfugiens, drregnisexulademptis^ 
Js genus indocile, acdifp'erfum mohtibus altis 
Compefuitjegeffe didit^ Latiumfy vocari 
Mduit. 



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C h a p.7.^4. of the Hifiorie of the World. 



103 



10 



S a t v r. n e defending from the heauens high, 
Fearing the Armes of I v p 1 t e k his Sonne, 
His Kingdome loft, and banifht thence doth flie. 
RudepeopleontheMountainetopshe wonne 
To Hue together, and by lawes : which done 
He chofe to call it Latium. 

And afterward in the Vcrfes following he fpeaketh of the Aufones , and after them 
of the Steam : Nations, which againe fought to difplant the ancient inhabiters ; 

"Turn trnmus Aufonia, ejrgentes venire Sicani. 

Then came th'Aufbnian bands, and the Sicanian tribes. 

Of thefe Sicani (yMQ\\\efcspainemdfox.edovi'i\e\x\ltalie)Thucydidesax\d Pliniegiuc 
teftimonie : who were againe expelled by the Ligij, faith Thucydides. After all thefe 
plantations and replantations came the Vmbri, defended ofthc Galles (faith Annius) 
not of thofe Guiles of France , but of thofe ofScythia , who commanded a great part 
of /£*&, cuen all Hetruru and Campania , as Herodotus, Plinie, and Dionyfms, haue af- 

3, o fured vs ; and therefore this floud of Deucalion was long after that of Noah. For all 
thofe Nations were planted in Italic, and difpoffeft ofltalie againe, before the Vmbri 
were cuer heard of, or had being. So that Kingdome was firft called Camafene, 
thcnZatium or Satumia, then Aufonia, then Sicania; before the Vmbri (inwhofe 
rim e Deucalions floud happened) poffeft the fame, about 3 06". yeares before the war 
otTroy : Lycaon then gouerning Arcadia ; who being the Father of two and twentie 
Sonnes, the youngeft called Oenotrius inuaded 7/^/ic^,whogaueitthename of Oe- 
notria. This name it held vntill Italus of the fame Nation changed it into Italic, 
after his ownename, about 250. yeares before the fall of Troy. After thefe came 
the Pelafgi , of whome Plinie'm his third Booke and lift Chapter ; and Strabom his 

30 fift; Thucy Aides \nh\s fixth fpeakes at large: and after them the Zydivnder Tyrrhene 
their Captaine, that gaue name to the Tyrrheni; who cafting thence the Vmbn,tooke 
from them three hundred Caftles, and built therein twelue Citties ; to which (after 
they had poffeft and paftouer the AppemneMoumzlnes) they added diuers others, 
whereof Telfina (afterward Bononia) was one. 

Now that there was not anciently fuch a Nation, as thefe Vmbri, in thofe parts , I 
doenotaffirme : hauing refpeft to the teftimonies before repeated. And Stephanut 
thinkes, that the name was deriued from the Greeke word Ombros; but that thefe 
Vmbri 0$ Italie were descended of the Nation of Scythians ( called GalliJ itfhallbee 
fhewed hereafter. 



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71 



$.1111. 

Offome other records tefiifying the vniuer fall floud: and of two ancient deluges in 
*s£gypt : and offome elfewhere. 

Aint Augustine out of Varro affirmcth that the Greekes and Latincs 
made not any mention of the vniuerfall floud, becaufe they had no- 
thing ofantiquitie foregoing that of Ogyges; and therefore (accor- 
ding to Rhodoginus before remembred) were all thinges among the 
,p ~ w«r^^, Greekes(whichantiquitiehadworneoutofknowledge)cailedo < e7 < g'/<?, 
which we in Englifh commonly call (worme-eaten) or of defaced date. But as all 
the parts of the earth were fucceffiuely planted and peopled ; and as all Nations had 
their proper times, and not their beginning at once and at the inftant : fodideuery 
familie which afterward became a great people, with whom the knowledge of di- 

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■■ — 1 c _j — ■ 1 - ■ ■ ■ - — — 

uine letters was not receiued, finde no parent of more antiquitie , then fiich as they 
had themfelues, nor allow of any before their owne ; and as the Grgrian jSjfodjdp- 
thctsjaunt themfelues tobe Ind/gent, and growing out of the earth,or inubnt fom» 
other prophane or ridiculous beginning. But the chdcUans had certaine knowledge 
of Noahs fioud , as Berofus witneffeth ; and Njcolans Damafienus maketh particular 
mention thereof (as is aforefaid) though he alfo affirme by heare-fay, that ibme Gr- 
ants faucd themfelues vpon the mountains Bar is in Armenia,bm fpeaketh not there- 
of as from any authoritie approued : vfing the word fermo eft, that fitch afpeech there 
was. And Eufebius remembreth a place out of the ancient Hiftorian Abydenus: who 
wnteththat J//frf/^«x to preferue himfelfe from a floud foretold him by Saturnus, 
fled to the hils of Armenia by fhip , ad Armenian nauigio confugiebat : who the third 
day (after the waters were fallen) fent forth birds,that finding no land to i eft ©^re- 
turned againe ; which hee alfb did a fecond time , but at the third returne the birdes 
feete were couered with mudde and flime. ' To this effecT: sxcEufebius wordes out of 
abydenus, which may feeme a true defcription (though in other termes) of Noahs 
floud. 

Cyrilks alfoaffirmeth, that Alex.Polyhiflor maketh mention of this generall floud. 
And Plato'm Ttmao produccth an ^/Egyptian Prieft, who recounted to Solon out of 
the holy Bookes of '^Egypt, the ftorie of the floud vniuerfall, which (faith he) hap- 
pened long before the Grecian inundations.Frycr AnniushisXenophon remembreth 2.0 
a third floud, which alfb Diodorus Siculus confirmeth, fomewhat more ancient then 
that of Ogyges in Attica. For he named the generall floud : for the firft , which hap- 
pened (faith he) vnder the old Ogyges, fubprifco Ogyge, which was Noah ; he calleth 
the fecond Niliaca : Hercules and Prometheus then liuing,44ycares before that of At" 
te,inthe34.yeareof&Wj«.rKing of the Affyrians, though I doe not belceue 
him as touching the time. But this floud couered a great part of the nether v£gypt y 
efpccially all that Region fubiecT: to Prometheus ; and hereof came the fable of the ■ 
tfat.cemM.c* Vulture on Prometheus his liuer,aftcrward ilaine by Hercules oftAEgypt : wHich fiftion 
Diod.Siculus deliuereth in thefe wordes: Fluuiumpropter curfus'velocitatem , profun- 
ditatemtfe aquarum Aquilam tunc appellatum, Hercvlem cum conflij magnitudine, 20 
turn virtule,volunt e "jeitigio comprefrffe , & aquarum impetum adprioremcurfum con- 
uertiffe : Vnde ijr Grm quidam Poet a rem gejlam infabulam -vertentes , Hercvlem 
tradunt Aquilam Promethei jecur depafcentem occidijfe, This floud (meaningo/ 
Niks) for the fwiftneffe of his courfe, as alfo for the depth , was in thofe dayes called the^f 
Eagle : but Hucvles by his great ■judgement andvertue did 'againe compreffi-j and. 
Jhaighten this Bitter Jo farre extended and otterflred , turning it into the old channels: 
Whence certaine Greeke Poets (concerting this labour andworkeofWzKcv les into tt 
fable) deuifed that Herc vi.es flew the Eagle, which fed on Promethevs litter $ 
meaning that he deliuerediV^f/^mr of that fbrrow and torment, which for the 
lofTeofhis people and Countrie (by the waters deftroyed and couered ouer) hee ao 
fufrered. 

A fourth floud chanced about Pharus in v£gypt, where Alexander <JWacedon 

built Alexandria, asAnnius conceiueth out of his Xenophm, who in this briefe fort 

Xm$M*qm*. writeth of all thefc inundations- Inundationes plures fuere;primanouimeftris inunda- 

cemm.perAn- ttoterrarum fubprifco 0<?y?e: fecunda Niliaca, &c. Therewere many inundations (faith 

■mm.fit.yi. ,. r J -C f i J r a I ■ 1 ■ rn r ■ lil-i I 

this lame Xenophon) theprfl which was •vniuerjauoj nine Moneths,andthts happened%>n- 
der the firfl Ogyges : the fecondwas Niliaca, and of one Moneths continuance in the 
time of Hercules -and Prometheus ^Egyptians : a third of two Moneths vnder Ogyges 
Atticus .-the fourth ofthree Moneths in Theffdia vnder Deucalion^ and a fift of the 
like continuance (called Pharonica) vnder Proteus of tAlgypt,about the time of Helens jo 
rape. Diodoms in his fift booke and eleuenth Chapter, taking the Samothraces for his 
Authours, remembreth a floud in Afia the lefTe and elfewhere,of no lefle deftru&ion 
then any of the other particular inundations, faying, that the fame happened before 
.that ofDeucdwn : the Sea of Poms and Hellcfpont breaking in ouer the land. 

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But there haue beene many flouds in diuers times, and ages, not infenour to any 

f theie two laft rcmembred , Miaca and Pharonica in v£gypt : as in thcyeare of our 
redemption 590. when in October ofthe fame yeare, Gj-^/if then being Bifhop of 
Home, there happened a maruailous ouerflowing in Holland especially in the Ve- 
netian territorie, and in Lyguria , accompanied with a mod fearefull ftorme of thun- 
derand lightning : after which followed the gr eat plag ue at Rome_j, byrealbn ofthc 
manydead Serpents_cafl vp and left vpon the fand , after'the waters dccre ^jfccT^d 
rctufnear"Andiritheyeare 144,5. there pcrilKedToooo. people, by the breaking MmH*; y ft~ 
in ofthe Sea at Dordroch in Holland: ofwhich kindc I take that floud to be olAchaid yA** c 
or Attica. Before thatand in thcyeare i%i8.Tnt/>emwsfycakcthof an earthquake «***«,• 
which fwallowed many thoufands: and after that of a floud inFrifeknd, in which >■<"»"*• citwui 
there perifhed 1 00000. perfons. Strozim Sigog. in his CWagh ommfaria, telleth of mul J* hem "T 
an inundation in Italic, in the time of Pope Damafus, in which alfo many Citties of Z>t%$T$k 
Sicile were fwallowed : another in the Papacie of 'Alexander the fixth-allo in the yeare *" marl <' m " 

1 j 1 5. Maximilian being Emperour. Hee alfo remembreth a perilous ouerflowing fijKSS 
in Poloma, about Cracouu, by which many people perilhed. Likewife Vi^mier a P'"aunt piuC- 
French Hiftorian fpeaketh of a great floud in the South part of Languedoc, which fell q ""'" I00000 ' 
in theyeareofour Lord 1557. with fodrcadfullatempeft, as all the people atten- 
ded therein the very end ofthe world, and iudgement day ; faying, that by the vio- 
lent defcent ofthe waters from the mountaincs, about Nifmes there were rcmoued 
diuers old heapes and mountures of ground, and many other places tome vp and 
rent : by which accident there was found bothcoyne of iilucr and gold, diuers pee- 
ces of plate, and veiTels of other mettall , fuppofed to be hidden at fuch time as the 
G^j-inuaded that Prouince,in the yeare 1 1 j<5. 



\. V. 




That the floud of 'N o am was fupernatura/l, though fime fay it might batten 
heene forefeene by the Starves. .iJi-.r ,■■*-]■ 

I O w howfoeuer all thefe flouds and many ottfer , which haue coucred 
. at feuerall times feuerall Regions, not on ly in thefe parts ofthe world 
) but in America alfo, (as I haue learned of fome ancient Southfayers a- 
| mong them) may be afcribed to naturall caufes and accidents 5 yet that 
i- vniuerfall floud (in the time ofl&ihj was powred ouer the whole face 
of the earth by a power aboue nature, and by the efpeciall commandement of God 
fiimlclte, who at that time gaue ftrength of influence to the Starres, and abundance 
to the Fountaines ofthe deeper whereby the irruption of waters was made more 
forcible, then any abilitie of nature could effcft, or any fecond caufes by whatfoe- 
uer vnion could pcrforme, without receming from the Fountainc of all power, 
4a "rengtn, and faculties fupcrnaturall. Henfiau UMedmienfis , a Schollcr of Albertm 
^Magnus , in his Commentaries vpon the great coniunftions of Albu CMdlkr obler- 
ucth, that before the floud of Noah, the like conjunction of Iupiterwd Saturne, 
Happened in the laft degreeof Cancer, againft thatconftellation fincecallcd the [InP 
ofArgos- by which the floud of Noah might be foretold , becaufe Cancer is both a 
watene iigne,and the houfeof theMoone, which is the Ladie ofthe Sea, and of 
moiiture, according to the rules of Astronomic, and common experience. And 
Z l l l^A° n sfl trm t A H tt0 v P° n Gme f' s confirmeth, affirming that although AHi Aa™. 
J^OM) did well know this floud by diuine reuclation, yet (this conjunction being no - du 7,ml % * 
torious) he could not be ignorant ofthe fecond caufes thereof: for thofe were not ^"'° g ' 

5° 0n }7 T es ' k"* aIfo w orkingcaufes,by ftrength receiued from the firft caufc,which 

lsGod himfelfe : and fiirrh.-r th^U,, ,* r„°„„.n„, m n /T3.,„i;ru„j -u._ _.-. , " Gen.i.n 



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lsGodhimielfe : and further that by * CaUrraclxadt (Engliflied the windows of 

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Tkefirjl 'Boo/^e ofthefirflpart Cha p. J. §.6. 




Cdt^t rA -^ l ieaucn ) <-M?fts meant this great and waterie coniunction; the word (Catarratfa) 



fignifying flowing downe or comming downe. Now (frith P. de Aliaco) itpleafed 
God to ordaine by the courfe of the Hcauens fuch a conftellation,by which all men 
might behold therein their deftruction towards, and thereby fbrfrke thole wicked 
waies wherein they walked, and call vnto God for mercie. 

Of this iudgement was Gut. Porifienfis, who vnderftood that the wordes Catar- 
racta ca?li, or windores ofheauen were to be taken for the former conjunction, or for 
thefewareriefignes, Cancer, Ptfces, Pleiades, Hyades, and Orion, and of the Planets, 
tMars, Venus, and the Mesne ': which are the forcible cau/cs of the greateft inundati- 
ons. His owne words are thefe, l^onduminteKgo Prophetom Hebr&orum catarraEtas io 
cwlivscajfe,nifpartesillas ueli,quageneratiua funt pluuiarum & inundatienumaquarum, 
quotes Juntfgna aquatica,vi Comer ejre. as aforefiid. As yet(frith he) Iperceiuenst what 
the Prophet of the Hebrews meaneth by thofe wordsfCotarracta ceAijor windores of Hea- 
uen) vnlefje he thereby -vnderftand thofe cdefiiall powers , by whofe influences are en- 
gendredthe raine , and inundations of waters, fuch as are the water k Signes of Can- 
cer (jrc. 

But in a word, as it might plcafe God, that in the courfe of his vnfearchable wife- 
dome this conjunction (hould at fuch time be: fo did he (as aforefrid) adde vigour 
andfacultie, and gaue to euery operation incrcafeofvertues, violent eruptions to 
Springs and fountaines, commaunding them tocaft out the whole treafure and ao 
heape of their waters ; taking retention from the Cloudes.and condenfing ayer into 
water by theminifterie of his Angels, or howfoeuer elfe beft pleafed his Al-power- 
fulnefTe. 



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$. VI. 



That thereWM noneede of any new creation of matter to make the vnherfaJl, . n 
Si'ia flsud : andwhot areCatarracl&Ca'li. ' -^ic-t^cl a* H<** ^ r 



"1 



1 are Catarracfx. Cali. ^m^>5mx>C < 
Gen. 7. vcrf 11. ,-*w«~ 



1 



3» 




D w if it be obiected, that God doth not create any thing of new ; 
(for God refteth the feuenth day: (that is)hedid not then after create 
any new /pedes) which graunted, it may feeme that then all the earth 
& ayre had not waters fuffirient to couer the habitable world fifteene 
cubitcs aboue the higheft mountaines. Of this propofition whether 
God hath foreftrained himfelfeorno, I will not difpute ; but for the confequent 
(which is) that the world had want of water to ouercouer the higheft mountaines 
I take that conceit to be vnlearned and foolifh ; for it is written,that the fountaines of 
the great deepewere broken ^(thatis)the waters forfook the verybowcls of the earth- 40 
and all whatfoeuer was difperft therein peirced and brake through the face thereof', 
t. Then let vs confider that the Earth had aboue one and twentie thoufrnd miles ■ the 
< Diameter of the Earth according to that circle feuen thoufrnd mile, and then from 
{ the Superficies to the Center feme three thoufrnd fiue hundred miles : Take then 
the higheft mountaine of the world, Caucafm, Tourmfilympm, or Atlasfhc moun- 
taines of Armenia or Scythia, or that (of all other the higheft) in Tenuerif and I doc 
not hndc, that hejhat looketh higheft ftretchefh aboue thirtie miles vprisht Itis 
not then impoffiblc, anfweringrcafbn with rcafon, that all thofe waters mixed i 
within the earth three thoufrnd fiuehundred miles deepe fhould not well helpe to 
couerthe fpaceof thirtie miles in height,this thirtyjnilcs vpright being found in the ?® 
,-Jrj U Ui, »-& W-^P WS0t search one hundred and fixteene times: for the fountaines of the ^reat 
I >T» ■. Deepe were broken vp, and the waters drawen out of the bowels of the earth ° Se- 

condly if we confider what proportion the earth bearethto the extenfionof the 
ayre ouer and aboue it, W e fhall finde the difference exceeding great. If then it plea- 
fed 



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107 



fed God to condenfc but fo much of this ayre as euery-where compaffcth and em- 
braceth the earth , which condenfation is a conuerfion of ayer into water, a change 
familiarin thofe elements, it will not feeme ftrange to men of Judgement, yea but 
of ordinarie vnderftanding,that the Earth (Godfo pleating) wascouered oucr with 
waters without any new Creation. 

Laftly for the opinions of Gulielmus Parijienfi, and Almenjis , to which I may 
addc Berofus and others, That fuch a coniunition there was, forelhewihg that dc- 
ftructionby waters which followed ; and that by the word CatmaS* edi, orWin- 
dores of heauen, was meant this coniunction ; there needes no other anfwere then 
1 that obferuation of ZMBHmto Vines, who affirmeth that by the graueft Afirologmnnt 
was obferued, that in theyeare 1 524. there fhould happen the like comuncbon , as 
at W^fofloud, then which (faith he) there was rieuer a more faire,dne, and feafo- 
nable yeare • the like deftruttion was prophecied of the yeare 1588. But Ptcm 
Earle ofCM/randula proueth that there could not bee any fuch coniunction at that 

"to conclude, I finde no other myfterie in the word Catarrarf* cdli, then that the 
clowdes were meant thereby : CKofes vfing the word IVm'dores of Heauen (if that bee. 
the fenfe of the word) to expreffe the violence of the raines, and pownng downc of 
waters For whofoeuer hath feene thofe fallings of water , which fometimcs hap- 

ft«5 pen in the Indies, which are called the Spowts ( where clowdes doe not breake into 
drops but fall with a refiftlciTe violence in one body) may properly vfe that manner 
of fpe'ech which CMofes did 3 That the windores or floud-gates of heauen opened : 
(which i s) Thatwat crsjell.contrarieto cuftome, and thatorder which we call na* 
turall. God then loofened the power retentiuc in the vppermoft aire , and the wa- 
ters fell in abundance : Behold{&hhlon)hewhichholdeththewaters, and they dric-J tiAt.ii.vXft 
•z/»,orbetterinLatine, Et omnia fecantur, and all things aredriedvp ; but when heefen- 
deththemout, they defray the earth : andinthe 26. Chapter. Hee btndeth the waters in 
the clowdes ; but thefe bonds God loofed at that time of the generall fioud , and cal- 
led vp the waters which flept in the great deep : and thefe ioyning together couered 

30 the earth, till they had performed the worke of his will : which done, hee then com- Cc „xt < 
maunded them to returne into their darke and vafl: caues, and the reft (by a winde) 
rarified againe into aire, formerly condenfed into drops. 



I 




50 



$. VII. 

of fame remainder of 'the •memorie of 'No ah among the Heathen, 

O a h commaunded by God , before the fall of thofe waters , entred 
the Arke which he had built, with his owne wife, and his fonnes , and 
his fonnes wiues, taking with them of eueriecreature, which tookc life 
by generation, feuen of the cleane, andofthevncleane, two. fioah x 
^ according to Philo, fignifieth cjuietneffej. after others, and according to 
theprophecie of his Father Lamech, ccflation; to whomc after-times gaue many 
names anfwering his antiquitie,zeale,vertue,and other qualities : as,Thefrf Ogyges, 
becaufe in the time of the Grecian Ogyges there was alio a great fioud of Achaia : Sa- 
turne they called him, becaufe hee was the Father of Nations : Others gaue him the 
name of Prometheus , who was faid to fteale away luf iters fire ; fire in that place be- 
ing taken and vnderftood for the knowledge of God and heauenly things. Others 
thinke that he was fo called for his excellent wifedome and forefight. Hee had alio 
the namcof ianus. (id est) vinofr-s,bccmCe Iain, fignifieth wine in the Hebrew. And 
fb Tcrtullian finds' him written in librts ritualibtu, in the bookes of ceremonies, preceding 
hot\i Saturne, Vranns, and lone: which three enioyed an elder time then all the o- 
thcr ancienteft faincd Gods. And this name lain is taken from the Hebrew and Sy- 
rian, and not from the Latine : for it was in vfe before there was any Latine Nation, 

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7^///? Soo% of the fir [I part C h a p.7. ^7, 

or any Kingdome by that name knowne. Of the antkjuitie of Ianm , Fab ius nttor 
giucth this tefhmonie. I A n i £t ate nulla crat Monarchy , quia mortalibm peclonbus 
wnaumhzferat vlk regnandi cuptditas, &c. rinum & far primus populos docmt I a n v s 
adfaenficia :fnmm emm arts & Pomzria & facra docuit, In the time of I a n v s (faith 
^therewasno^marchi^^orthedefireofrulehadnotthenfddeditlehedoHtth 
heartsojmen l^ * first taught the peopk to facrtfccWwe and Mede^: he frit fetvp 
^Uars,mJtitutedgardensandJolitarie grmes, wherein they vfedtopray ; with other ho- 
lientes and ceremonies^ A greater teftimonie then this there cannot be found among 
the Heathen, which in all agreeth fo well with the Scriptures. For firft, wh.leif 
SffH^^SSSS^l * «**?* •• « being thefirft that l9 



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tookconhimfoueraigneauthorme. Secondly, ^oah after the floud wasthe firft 
that plantedtheVine, _and became a hufbjjidman [and therefoTedfered the firft - 

Altar anc^^enhee to God , a thanks-giuing for his mercifullgoodneffeto" X 
wardsh.m • W.wasa fohgn.hedmthenam'e of Bifions (which waLiuen o/l 
A. W . ^becatiiehebeheldtl^ 

rit,&futura M pexerit, Mh ^W^. Becaufe he knew what w J pa3, andprmded 
forwhatw^ to corny. Hcwasalfoin theperfonof /.^(hadowed by thenameof 
Cte,and>™^, thefeedeoftheworld; becaufe as out of that confufed heape 
was drawne all theiindes of bcafts and plants.: fo from s^«* came all mankind? • as 
^g whcreof.o^intheperfonof/^w...- u * " 

•9,i,ldef4!s.U <jfe chaosantiqui(namfumresprifea)vocabanT, 

Afjike quam long/ temporis aclacano. 

The ancient call'd me Chaos : my great yeares 
By thofe old times, ofwhich 1 fing, appeares," 

ft wasa ' f ° intitulcd Ocelum^A ^/,-Heauenand theSunne, for his excellent know-" 
ledgein Afbxmomie: r*r/**»«,, Bacchus , nm\ Liber Pater ^ not that latter , which ,« 
DiodSiadus, and Ahc.Aphrodifcus fi call, beraufe he was theteftorerof theGreekes 3 
to their formerhbertie but in refped of the floud. For the Greekes called Liber 

t >! A 1 u c S N ^ S ' °f rainc ' becaufe ^ oah entred the ^*'» when the Sunne 
ioynedwiththeStarres//V«,aconftellationinthebroworneckeofr^^ an d 
eueraftera monument of Noahs floud. He was alfo by others furnamed Triton a 
Marine God , the Sonne of Njptune: becaufe hee lined in Cifetie on the waters So 
was he knowne by thename ofDwnyf^qmfif.^^mentempungensMe-braine 
or TO /-yi^ though piodorw conceiue otherwife, and deriue that name i patre& 
T a >yr^ er ' andt ^™f^birth,(m 

ha/vhxfmthSuidatomof Orphew, He had alfo the by-name of Taurm, or Tauro- ,* 
/W; becaufehefirft yoked Oxen and tilled the ground, according to that of Mo- 4 
Jes AndN o a h became an husbandman. Now howfocuer the Grecians vaunt of 
their Theban Bacchm (otherwife Dionyfm fit is certaine that the name was borrowed 
and the muention ftollen from Noah. But this name ofitoW, more anciently Bol 
a*, was taken (faith Gd.StuAms, and out of him Daum) from W^^,^/bein ff 
S3ft* l 13 " S v d f ° W^ndiristhemoreprobable, becaufe it cannot bee doubted buf 
mamdiitate. tilat -^w^diefirft planKrofthe_Vinejf^ f Noah (the firft . 

ancient^ Bacchus) wereaTTthoTFTables deuifed, ^HicOT^mrcomplaineth in his 
fourth Booke.and fifth Chapter. Th 1S firft Bacchus (to wit) Noah wasfurnamed 
pj'us., of the mountaine Nyfam India, wherethe Gra-cian ^^wneuer came,what- to 
loeuerthemfeluesfaineofhisenterprifes;andthefemountainesofiV^iovnewith 

^:Lta;:Sefl^^ 

Jurthcrmore, to the end that the memorie of this fecond parent of mankindc 

might 



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might the better bepreferued , there were founded by his iffiies many great Citties 
which bare his name ; with many riuers and mountaincs : which oftentimes forgat 
that it was done in his regard , becaufe the many names giuen him brought the fame 
C onfuliontoplacesastohimfelfe.Notwithftandingallwhich,wefindetheCittieof -prm.i.e. 
iW;vponthebankesoftheredScaandeIfewhere: the Riuer of Mat fa f brace, %£$%* 
which .sW^calleth Mar us ; Ptolomit Dams ; diuiding illyria from Panonia. Thus straboi.r. 
much for the name. 



10 



$. VIII. 

Of Tundrie particulars touching the Arke : as the place where it was made^j 
the matter, fajtion andname^j-. 




.fj> 



-4 



;Ow in what part ofthe world 'Noah built the Arke, it doth notap- 
^peare in the Scriptures , neither doe I finde any approued Authour 
I that hath written thereof : only Gcropim Becanus in his mdo-Scythia 
>concciueth,th-at Noah built his Arke neare the mountaincs ofCaucafus, 
\, becaufe on thofehilsare found the goodlieft Cedars: for when Alex. 
ZMacedmrsxa.de. the warre among a people, called Nyf&i, inhabiting the other fide of 
20 Caucafus,hce found all their burials and Sepulchers wrought ouer with Cedar. To 
this place (faith Becanus) Noah repaired, both to feparate himfelfe from the rcpro- 
, bate Giants, who rebelled againft God and Nature, as alfb becaufe he would not be 
interrupted in the building ofthe Arke ; to which alfb hee addeth the conueniencie 
of riuers, to tranfport the Timber which hee vfed, without troubling any other car- 
riages. ' : 

Only this wee arc furc of, that the \_Jrh was built in fome part of the Eafterne 
world; andtomyvnderftanding, notfarre from the place where it refted after the 
floud. For2\W,>didnotvfeanymaftor faile (asinotherfhips) and therefore did! 
the Arke no othcrwife moue then the Hulke or body of a fhip doth in a calme Sea. 
3 o Alfb becaufe it is not probable, that during thefe continuall and downe-right raines 
there were any wind.es at all, therefore was the Arke little moued from the place 
where it was fafhioncd and fet together. For it is written : Godmade awinde to faffe cmA.il g 
upon the earth, and the waters cea[ed;w\d therefbreit may be gathered, that during the 
fall ofthe waters, there was not any ftorme Or forcible winde at all, which could 
driue the Arke any great diftance from the place where it was firft by the waters lif- 
ted vp. This is alfb the more probable, if that ancient opinion bee true, as it is very 
likely, that the Arkerad fundum planum , a flat bottome, andnotraifedinfofmeofs 
fhip with a fharpnefle forward, to cut the waues for the better fpeede; 
This kind of Veffcll the Hebrewes call Thebet,and the Greekes Larnaxfovfo they 
40 termed Deucalions fhip • and fome fay, that the hill Parnaffus, to which in eight dayes 

he arriued, was firft called LartkJJusjmd by the change of(L) into (?) Parnaflus^but stepkdevrt; 
Panfanias thinks that it tooke name of a Sonneof the NympheCleadou, called Par- Mm. 
naffus, the inueiltourof Augur ation. 

Fencer m findes the worcf ( Parndfftts) to haue no affinitie with the Greeke, but vcOraculfili 
thinks it dcriucd from the Hebrew word Nahas , which fignificth Aaguraiion and »<• 
niuination : or from Bar or Parai , as in his Chapter of Oracles in the leafe before 
cited. 

Io fiphms cals the Arke LMxchina, by the generall name of a huge Frame : and Epi* tfib.inAmf, 
phamiis out ofthe Hebrew Aran ; but herein lieth the difference betweene^w» 
jo and Tfefe, That ^riwfignifieth properly the ^rytr of the Sanffuane , but Thebet 
fuch a Veffell, as fwimmeth, and beareth it felfc vpon the waters. 

Laftly, this ^yirkc otNjah differed from the fafhion of a fhip in this, that it had a 
couer and roofe, with a crcft in the middeft thereof , and the fides declining like the 
roofc ofan houfc ; to the end, both to caft off the waters, and that thereunder Noah 

L " " himfelfe 



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Gm.6*. himfelfe and his children might flicker , and feparate themfelues from the noyfbm- 
ncfle of the many beafts, which filled the other roomes and parts ofthe Arke. 

Of what wood the Arke was built it is vncertaine. The Hebrew word Gopher 
once and in this place only vfed is diuerfly vnderftood ; and though the matter bee 
of little importance, yet this difference there is , That the Geneua Transition cals 
it Pinetrec, the Rabbtne Cedar, the Seuentie fquare timber , the Latine fmooth tim- 
ber. Others will hauc it Cypres trees , as dedicated to the dead , becau/e Cypres is 
Worne at funerals. But out of doubt if the word Gopher fignifie any ipeciall kinde of 
timber, Noah obayed the voice of God therein ; if not, hee was not then curious as 
touching the kinde or nature ofthe wood, hauing the promife of God,and his grace I o 
and mercie for his defence. For with Noah Cod promifed to cftablifh his couenant. 
■4°. Plinie affirmeth that m^Aigypt it was the vfe to build (hips of Cedar, which the 
worme eates not ; andheauowefh thatheiaw in Vtica, in the Temple of Apollo 
Cedar bcames, laid in the time ofthe foundation ofthe Cittie , and that they were 
ftill found in his time, which was abdue 1 1 88. yeares after: prouing thereby , that 
this kindeofwood was not fiibiccltoputrifyingormoulding in a very long time. 
But in that it is cafie to cut, light to carry , and of a fweet fauour , Lifting alfo better 
then any other wood, and becauie neare the place where the Arkere&ed, there are 
found great ftore of thefe Cedar trees , as alfo in all the mountaines of the Eaft , be- 
fides thofe ofLibanw , it is probable enough that the Arke might be of that wood : io 
which hath befides the other commodities the greateft length of Timber,and thcr- 
fore fitteft to build (hips withall. Pererim conceiueth that the Arkehad diuers forts 
of timber, and that the bottome had ofonefort, the deckeand partition ofanother; 
all which may be true or falfe, if Gopher may be taken for timber in generall. Trueit 
is, that Cedar will ferue for all parts of a (hip , afwell for the body , as for mafts and 
yards. But Noah had moft refoeft to the direction rcceiued from God : to the length, 
breadth, and heighth, and to the partitions ofthe Arke ; and to pitch it , and to di- 
uide it into Cabines, thereby to feuer t he cleane beaft s from the v ncleane, and to 
preferuc their feucrall forts of foods ; aHThlHTmlgTube capable of all kinde of ti- 
lling creatures', according to' the numbers by God appointed. All which when 30 
Noahhad gathered together, hee caft his confidence wholly on God, who by his 
Angels fteeredjhjsjhjpwithout a rudder, and directed it without the helpeof a 
Cpmpaffc or the Northftarrc. The pitch which Noah vfed, is by fom e fuppofed to 
hauc beene a kinde of Bitumen, whereof there is great quantitie about the Valley of 
Sodomemd Gomorra, now the dead Sea or Afphaltes ; and in the Regiortof Babylon, 
and in the Weft India, and herein it exceedeth other pitch that it melts not with the 
Sunne, but by the fire only, after the manner of hard waxe. 



(« 



Permits. 



$. IX. 

That the Arke to as of fufficient capacitie. 



43 






Be ciuiht.'Dci 
l.i).c.it. 




S|g< He Arke according to Gods commaundement had of length three 
hundred cubites,firtieofbreadth,andthirtiedeepeor high .-bywhich 
proportion it had fixe parts of length to one of breadth, and ten times 
in length to one of depth; ofwhichS*. Avgvstine. Proculdubio 

figura eft peregrmantis in hocficulo Ciuitatis Dei, (hoc effj Ecclefix, qua fit 
fahmper lignumjn quopependtt (-Mediator Dei & hominum,homo c hriltus l efts : nam & • 
menfura ipfa longitudinis, altitudinis, latitudiniftfo eimfignificat corput humanum, in cuius 
veritateadhominespr&nunciatweftventurus,o-'vemt,&c. Without doubt ((aithhe) it 50 
is t figure of theCittie of God, trauailingin this world as aftranger (that is) ofthe Church, 
fauediy the treewhereupon the CMediatom betweene GodandCMan, theman lefts Christ 
did hang .-for euen the very meafurc ofthe length, heighth, and breadth, anfwercththejhape 
efmans bodj,in the truth whereof the camming ofchrifi was foretold and performed. 

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By what kindeof Cubite the <^irke was mcafurcd, it hath beene a difputed que- 
ftion among the Fathers, and others ; and the differences are in effect thefe. The 
firft kinde of cubit (called the Com mon) containeth one foot and a halfe meafured 
from the (harpe of the elbow to the point of the middle fingen Theiecond (the 
palme cubit) which taketh one handrail more then the common. The third is cal- 
led Regius Cubitus, or the Perfian Cubit, which exceedcth the common cubit three 
inches. The fourth isthe facred cubit, which containeth the common or vulgar 
cubit double, wanting but a quarter or fourth part. Laftly there is a lift cubit, cal- 
led Geometricall, which containeth fix common cubits. But of all thefe fortes 
io which were commonly meafured by the vulgar cubit, the alteration and diminuti- 
on of mens natures hath made the difference. For as there is now a leiTe proporti- 
on of bodies : fo is the common cubit, from the {harpe of the elbow to the point of 
the middle finger, of leffelength then it was in elder times; 

S c Auguftine confidering the many fortes of beaftesand birds which the Arfo 
held, wi th their food and water, was fometimes of opinion, that the Arke had pro- I i° 
portion after the Geometricall cubit, which containeth alfnoft fix of the Common. 
For measuring thereby the vulgar cubit, it did not exceed the capacitieof that Athen &mr> 
veflell built by Hiero oC J>r*«»/?jOrtheftiipof Ptolomie Philo-pater. But S t Au?u- B *' 
ftine (who at the firft was led by Origen) changed his iudgementas touching the F '""" >n ''"i 
10 Geometricall cubit; and found vponbetterconfideratioh, that there needed not Co V>m " rH ' 
huge a bodie to praTerue all fortes of creatures by God appointed tobereferued 
For it was not needfull to take any kindes of filhes into the Arke, becaufe they 
werekept liuing (faith S? Auguftine) intheir owne element: Vionfuii neceffe conferm- 
rein <^4rca qu&poflent in aquis viuere ; nhnfolum merfa ficutpifces,vemmfuper-natmtia 
JicutmulUalites. ItwasnotneedfulltoconferuethofecreaturesintheArke,whichtouldliut 
in the waters <,andnotonely$hes which canliuevndcrwater,but alfo thefefmvles which/if 
mdfmmmeonthem : andagaine, Terranin aqm,malediCta, qui"* Adam nbn hums, fed MinOt 
tUmsfrucJumvetitumcomedit. Itwastheearth,andnotthewaters,which GodcurfedUor V&Stuii 
of the forbidden frutt of the earth and not of the Sea , did Adam eat ; Co as S< Augufline 
3 o gathercthhereupon, (as aforeTaid) that fo huge a Frame needed not. 

And if wee lookc with the eies of Judgement heereunto.wee (hall finde nothing 
monftrous therein ; although the imaginations of men, who (for the mod part) v ' 
. hauemoreof mifchiefeand of ignorance, then of any reuerend reafon finde many !- 
impoflibihties in this worke of God. But it is manifeft, and vndoubtedly true that 
many of the Species , which now feeme differing and of feuerall kindes, were nor. 
then mrerumnatura. Forthofe beafts which are of mixt natures, either they were 
not in that age, or elfe it was not needfull to praTerue them : feeing they might bee 
generated againebyothers,asthe Mules, the Hyena's and the like: the one be- > 

• gotten by Affes and Mares, the other by Foxes and Wolues. And whereas by dif- 
40 coueringof ftrange landes, wherein there arc found diucrsbeaftesandbirdesdiffc, 

ring in colour or nature from thofe of thefe Northcme parts,it may be fuppofed by 
a luperhciall confideration, that all thofe which weare red arid pyed skinnes,or fea* 
thers, are differing from thofe that are leffe painted,and were plaine rulfet or black : 
they are much miftaken that fo thinke. And for my owne opinion I finde no differ 

• rence^ut onely in magnitude, betweene the Cat of Europe, and the'D^nce of Indiai, 
andeuen thofe dogges which are become wiide in Hiftagmola, with which the Spa. 
niarcTTvTed to deuourethe naked Indians, are now changed to wolues, and begin to 
deltroy the breed of their Cattle, and doe alfo oftentimes tcare afSder their owne 
Children. Thecommon Crowe and Rooke of India is fullof red feathers ijj the amm*^ 

5 o drown d mdhw If/ands of Cartbana ; and the Blackbird andThrulh hath his fea- W 'T? 

' f c l S miXt WIth biacIcand carnation : in the North parts ofrjrginia. The doefifh 

of hnglandisthe Sharkeof the South Ocean : Forifcolouror magnitude made a 

adifference of Species, then were the 2(egro's, which we call the Black -mores 
nhn animalia rationale not men, but fome kinde of ftrange beaftes : and fo 

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the Giants of the South ^wfwafhouldbeeofanotherkinde, then the people of 
this part of the World. Wee alfo fee it daily that the natures of fruits are changed 
bytranfplantation, fome to better, fbmeto worfe, especially with the change of 
Climate. Crabs may be made good fruit by often grafting , and the belt Mellons 
wilj.change in a ycare or two to common C.o v«imm p r'i. b n y being fet in a barr en, 
foile : T herefore taking the kindes pTaJcifely of all creatures,as they were by God 
■created, or out of the earth by his ordinance produced : The Arke, after the mea- 
fure of tbecommon Cubit was fiimaently capacious tocontaineof all, according 
to the number by God appointed : For if we adde but halfe a foot of meafure to 
the Common Cubit, which had a footandahalfe of Giantlie ftature (and leffeal- id 
lowance we cannot giue to the difference betweene them and vs) then did the Arke 
containe 600. foot in length, and 1 00. foot in brcadth,and <5o.fbot dcepe. 

But firft of all to make it manifeft, that the Geometricall Cubit is not vfed in the 
Scripture, the ftature of the Giants therein named may fuffice. For if the bed of 
GgKingof.B.yS#had been nine Geometricall Cubites long , it had taken 54. Cu- 
bites of the common, which make So-foot : and Goliah, who had the length of 6. 
Cubites and a handfull , which makes nine foot and a handfull, a proportion credi- 
ble) if thefe Cubites had beene Geometricall , then had beene 5 4. foot in heighth 
and vpwards,which were monftrous and molt incredible: for (according to this pro- 
portion) had the head oi Goliah beenenine fbotlong, and farre waightier and big- a© 
ger then all Dauids bodie, who carried it away. 

Againeif the Geometricall Cubit had been vfed fora meafure in the Scripture as 
many Commenters haue obferued, then had the Altar (appointed to containe hue 
Cubites of length, hue of breadth and three of heighth) haue reached the length of 
■x 7 .foot vprighr,and fo muff their Prieftes haue afeended by fteps or ladders to haue . 
performed their facrifices thereon, which was contrarie toGods Commandemcnt 
EwAio.iS. giuen in thefe wordes : Thau/halt not gocvpwith Jieppes'vnto mine altar,that thy flame 
bee not difcouered thereon ; and therefore was the Altar but three Common Cubites 
high which make foure foot, that- their Priefts ffanding thereby might execute their 
office : Wherefore f may conclude,that the Cubit mentioned in the Scriptures was 3 a 
not the Geometricall, bat the ordinaric Cubit of one foot and a halfe, according to 
the meafure of Giandy ftature ; which mea'fiire (doubtleffe) might giue much the 
more capacitie to the Arke, although it be alfb probable, that as the men were , fb 
were the horfes whereon they rode^nd all other creatures of a correspondent fize. 
And yet (as I take it) though by thismeanes there were not any whit the more 
roomein the Arke, it were not hard to conceiue, how all thediftinct Species of <^f- 
nimals, whofe lines cannot bee prxferued in the waters, might according to their 
prasfent quantities' bee contained in a vefTell of thofe dimenfions which the ^irke, 
had ;allowingto the Cubit one footand a halfeofour now vfuall meafure: whence 
it followeth of neceflitie, that thofe large bodies which wereinthedaiesof 2{oah 43 
might haue roome fufficientin the Arke, which was meafiired by a Cubit of length 
proportionable. 

How the appointed number of creatures,to be faued (that is) feuen of thecleane, 
two of the vncleane (with neceffarie foode)might haueplace in the Arke,BuUo hath 
very learnedly declared :thc briefe fumme of whofe difcourfe to that purpofe is this. 
The length of the Arke was three hundred cubits, -which multiply ed by the breadth, namely 
fiftie cubits, andthe product by the heighth ofthirtte cubits , jheweth the whole concauitie to 
haue beene 450000. Now whereas thepoffs, walles, and other partitions of lodg- 
ings may feeme to haue taken vp a great part of the hollowrthe heighth of theroofe 
which (the perpendicularbeing one cubit) contained 7500. cubicallcubes , was a 50 
fufficient recompence : ff therefore in a fhip of fuch grcatnefTe wee feeke roomefor 
89.diftincf^a«ofbeaffs,or(lean:anyihouldbeomitted) for 100. feuerall kinds, 
we fhall eafily findc place both for them, and for the birds, which in bignefle are no 
way anfwerable to them , and for meatc to fuftaine them all. For there are three 

fortes 



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Qhav.j.§ao.-\.i.z. of the Hiftorie of the World, 



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forts of beafts, whofe bodies arc of a quantitie beft knowne j the Beefe,the Sheepe, 
and the Wolfe : to which the reft may be reduced, by faying, ( according to Arijio- 
tle) that one Elephant is anfwcrable to foure Beeues, one Lyon to two Wolues,and 
fb of the reft. Of beafts, fomefcede on vegetables, others on flcfti. Thereareone ) 
and thirtie kinds of the greater fort, feeding on vegetables : of which number, onely / 
three are cleane,according to the law cfcMofcs, whereof feuen of a kinde entred into ( 
the Arke, namely three couples for breede, and one odde one for facrifice : the other 
eight and twentie kindes were taken by two of each kinde , fo that in all there were 
in the Arke one and twentie great beafts cleane,and fixe and fiftie vncleane.eftimable ) 
l o for largeneffe as 9 1 . Beeues ; yet for a fupplement ( leaft perhaps any species bee o- 
mitted) let them be valued, as 120. Beeues. OfthelcfTerfort, feeding on vegeta- 
bles were in the Arke fixe and twentie kinds, eftimabl e with good allowance for fup- 
plie, as fourefcore Sheepe. Of thofe which deuour flefh were two and thirtie kinds, 
anfwerable to three fcore and foure Wolues. All thefe 1 80. beafts might be kept in 
one ftorie or roome of the Arke in their feuerall Cabbines ; their meate in a (econd : 
the Birds and their prouifion in a third, with place to fpare for Wjah and his f amilie 4 
and all their neceiTaries. 



ao 



\. X. 

That the ^Arke relied vp on part of 'the hili 'Taurus (orCaucafm) betweene the_j 
Eaji Indtes, and Scythia. 




t. I. 

'A pretention offome queflions leffe materiall: with a note of the vfe of this queliion, ti, 
firtde out the iMetrop'tlu of Nations, 

! Hat time "Noah tooke to build the Arke , I leaue to others to difpu'te j 
1 but he receiued the Commandehient from God 1 oo.yeares before the 
■ waters fell.-and had therefore choice oftime and leifurefufficient. As 
; for the number ofdecks & partitions, which origen deuides into foure, 
S t .Augufine into three, I will not trouble the Reader with the con- 
trouerfie : or whether thofe creatures which fometimes reft on the land, other times 
in the waters, as the Crocodiles (now called Alegartos) the Sea-cowes or Sea-horfes, 
were kept in the Arke, or no, I thinkeitaneedleffecuriofitie; and yet to this faith 
Tererim, and others before him, that afifh-pdole might bee made afwell within the 
Arke, as in HierohisQnipofSyracu/e. Laftly, toconfiderorTabourtodifprouethe 
foolcrie of the Hebrewes,who fuppofe that the Arke was lightened by* a Carbuncle, 
4° orhadwindoresofCriftalltoreceiueinlight, and keepe out water, were but to re- 
uiue the buried vanities of former times. But that which I feeke moft to fatisfiemy 
felfe and others in", is in what part of the world the Arke refted after the floud : be- 
caufe the true vnderftanding offome of thefe places (as thefeate of the terrcftriall 
Paradife, and the refting of the <^y£rke) doe only and truly teach the worlds planta- 
tion, and the beginning ofNations, before and after the floud ; and all ftorie, as well 
generall as particular, thereby may be the better vnderftood. 



5° 



t- u 



A fropofall of the common opinion, that the Arkerejledvponfomeoftho 
Ms of Armenia. 

Nd firft, for the true place where the Ark<LJ refted after the floud, and from 
> what part of the world the children of 7S(oah trauailcd to their firft fettlcment 

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and plantation, Iamrelblucd (without any prefumption) that therein the moil: 
writers were vttcrly miftaken. And I am not led fo to thinkeout of my humour or 
newncfleofopinion,orfingularitie ; but doe herein ground my felfeontheorigi- 
nall andikfttruth, which jsthe word of God , and after that vpon reafbn , and the ■ 

&*.8.4. rnoft probable" circumftances thereon depending. For whereas it is written, that the 
Arke flayed -upon one of the mounuines of Ararat, which the Chaldaan Paraphraft hath 
conuerted Kardu, meaning the hils Gordti or Gar did in Armenia the greater : (as the 
wordes Gordti and Kardu feeme to bee one and the fame) of which opinion alfb the 
moft of our Interpreters arc ■ I finde neither Scripture nor re ifon which teacheth 
any fuch thing: (to wit) thatitrefted on thatpiutof ''Ararat, whicKis in the greater ro 

Sec t.i.%.u Armenia. T^jcolaus Damafcenus cals this mountaine of Ararat, Baris, being the fame 
which the Chald<ean namcth Kardu , to which mountaine the Fryer Annms (citing 
this place out of 'lofephus) makes him finde another adioyning, called Ocila, and to 
fay that the Arke (ofwhichc%/«thcLawgiueroftheHebrcwes wrote) did firft. 
take ground on this Ocila. But I doenot finde any fuch mountaine in being, as this 
Ocila ; neither is thereany mention of it in the place of lofephus. Strabo remem- 
breth a Promontorie in Arabia frlix, of that name , and Plinie findes a Mart-towne 
fo called in the fame, which Ptolomiecais Ocilis, Pinetus Acyla, and Niger Zidon. But 
this Ocila of Damafcenus, or rather ofAnniusfecmeth to be one and a part of the Ar- 
menian mountaines. Berofus czWeth. thofe mountaines of Armenia Cordiai, and Cur- at, 
tins Cordd: Ptolomie Gordxi and Gordim: of which the Countrie next adioyning is 
by this Nicolaus Damafcenus called Ninyada, perhaps (as Becanus conieclures) for 

i^imm- ■ii.vj. CMilyada or rather Minni : which word is vied for Armenia Minor. And the very 
word of^ww^feemes to be compounded of this word CMinni, and Aram.-zsii 

nat.bij!.l.s.cu we mould fay Ctemni of Syria ; for that Armenia alfb was a part of Syria , Plinie_j 
witneffeth. Epiphanius placeth the Cardyes about thefe mountaines, whom others 
call Gordieni or Gordeni. The mountaines are feated a part from all other to the 
North ofthat Ledge of mountaines railed Taurus, or JViphates'm the plainesof Ar~ 
menia the great,neare the Lake fhojpitu : whence the Riuer of Tigris flowethin 75. 
. , degrees of longitude, and 4 1. and 42. degrees of latitude. One of the mountaines 
Gordid (that which furmounteth thereft) Epiphanius cals Lubar , which in the Ar- 

^lofcph. de A*tiq, menian fignifieth a place of defcent : but this out of lofephus ; which name (fakh Iu- 

l.i.c.4, < wWj was oftheeuent,becaufeofiV^jcommingdowne with hischildren. But this 
alfb I take to be a fuppofed eucnt ; feeing any hill , from whence on euery fide wee 
mi!ftdefcend,maythusbecalled:as Iunius corrects the place in lofephus W&tpi C 
(Kubaris.) That the place is thus to be read, he conieftureth, hccw&iJofiphL 1 .c.4. 
laies, the placeis called wga-irificf (as it were the defcent or commingdowne) and 
Epiphan.l. i.cspt.Hwef. cals it A3?a P : which word in the Armenian and «s£gyptian 
-tongue fignifieth defcent, of Lubar, which is to defcend; whencealfbz#^?is a Sy- 
'^y-rt^oty^ nagogue, becaufe it was commonly built on fbme high place : whereof alfb the La- 

tine Belubrum may feeme to be deriued; and Ai7.6.$. they that belonged to the 
Synagogue of the Egyptians are called Libcrtini, for Lubratenu. Yet this opinion 
hath beene embraced from age to age : receiving a habit of ftrength by time, and al- 
lowance without any farther examination ; although the name of Lubar might o- 
therwife rightly be giuen, efpecially to that mountaine, by reafbn thatthepafTagc 
Tvas more faire, vp and downe vnto it, then to any of the reft adioyning. 



3° 



43 



t- III. 

The firft argument againji the common opinion. They that came to build Babel, would haiic 
comefooner, had they eome from fo neare a place as Armenia. 

T> Vt there are many arguments to perfwade me , that the Me of 7{oah did not 
reft it felfe m iany part of Armenia and that the mountaine Ararat was notBam, 

iior any one of the Gerdiaan mountaines. "" : 

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C h a p . y.§. i o . f 4. of the Hi/lorie of the World. 



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For firft, it is agreed by all which follow Berofm, that it was in the 1 3 o. yeare or 
in the yeare 1 3 1 .after the floud,when :?£wWcameirito the valley of Snmar, which '*' 
Valley was afterward called Babylonia, chu/Jj, m&chaUUa. If then the^iHrhad 
firft found land in Armenia, it is very vnprobablc , that the children of 2Voah which 
came into that valley could hauc fpent lb many yeares in fo fhort a paffao C • feeing 
the Region of CMejopotamia was onelyintenacent, which might by eaiicVurneies 
hauc been paftouerin ao.daies h and to haftemand help which paffige thenauigible 
nucr of Tigris offered it felfe, which is euene where tranfpaflable by boats of treat 
burden : fo as where the Defalt on the one fide refilled their expcdition,the riuer on 
10 thecontrarie fideferued to aduanceit ; the riuer rifing out of the fame Led^eof 
mountaines, or at the foot of them, where the ^irke of 2v>£ was firft fuppofed to 
fettleit felfe ; Then, if theNations which followed NimrodftAl doubted the fur- 
prife of a fecond floud (according to the opinions of the ancient Hebrewes) it foun- 
deth ill to the eare of reafon , that they would haue fpent many yeares in that low 
and ouerflowen Valley of ' Mefifetamia, fo called of the many Riuers which imbroi 
dcr or compaffe it : for the effect s witneffed their affeftions , and the workes which 
they vndertooke, their vnbeliefe; being no fooner arriued in shinar, but they be- 
gannetoprouidethemfelucs of a defence (by erecting Babel) againftany future or 
feared inundation. Nowat&Witwasthat5YV?wWbeganne his Kmgdome the 
•10 firft knowne Cittie ofthe world founded after the floud, about 1 3 r . yeares or (as ) 

othersfuppofe)tcnyeareslater:though(formyfl-lfe)lratherthinke,thatthcyvn- L 
dertookethanvorkcintworefpedfsi firft, to make themfelues famous, Togetvsa r fe„.,c , 
name (faith the Text : ) Secondly, thereby to vfurpe dominion ouer the reft. [*«/. /.i. ' 



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The fecond argument, That the Eafterne people weremott ancient in fopulofii^ 
and in all humane glories. 

30 pOrafecond Argument : The ciuilitie, magnificence and multitude of people 

it n (W Tul u i alt pal ' tS ° f d ? e T V ! d hrft aboul ^ed)hath more waight then any 
thing which hath beenc, or can befaid for Armenia^* for Noah taking land there 
And that this is true, the vfe of Printing and Artillerie (among many other thinges" 

the mft ancient The certa.ntie ofthis report , that the Eaft Indians ( timeout of 
m.nde)hauehad Gunnesand Ord.nanceofbatterie,confirmed by the Portland 
others makes vs now to vnderftand, That the place of BMriusin vita ApoOmii 
riansi ? U.c. 1 4. is nofable, though expreft in fabulous wordes : when he faith, that 
the wife men, which dwell betweene Hyphafa and Ganges,^ not themfelues to goe 

4o forth into battaile • but that they driue away their enemies with thunder and light- 
ning -font from lupiter By which meanes thereit is laid, that Hercules ^gyptiJand 
^W,,oyn,ng their forces were defeated there ; and that this Here Acre cA 
away his golden fhield. For the in uention of letters wasienorantly afcribxd to Cad- 

. w«f,bcc:.ul e he brought them firft into Greece L of which the people (then rude and 
Muage) had reafon to gme him the honour , from whom they receiued the benefit 
£ut it is true , that le_ttcrs arc no lefle ancient then Sethor Benocbwcre: for they are 
laid to haue written on pillers offtone(as before rem embred) long before the floud T * 

r fn 1C E:lfterne workfit was that John Cuthenber^ a Germane^rought thede- 
mle of Printing : by whom Conradm being inftrucfed , "brought the praft ife thereof 

5 to Rome : and after that Nicholas Gerfon a Frenchman , bettered both the letters -ind 
inuention. And notwithstanding that this myfterie was then fuppofed to bee but 
newly borne , the cfei w had letters long before either the e^ ? «L w or Phrmci- 
» «»; and alfothe Art of Printing, when as the Greekes had neither any ciuill know- ■ 
ledge, or any letters among them. } 

And 




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116 Thejirfl < Bool{eofthefrJ}part Chap.7.^.io.|.j. 





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And that this is true,both the Pertugalsand Spaniards hauc witneffed,who about 
an hundred yeares fince difcouered thofe Kingdomes, and doe now enioy their rich 
trades therein : for the chimes account all other Nations but Saluages, in re/pecT: of 
themfelues. • 

And to adde ftrength to this argument, the conqueft and ftorie of^jlex. Mact 'don 
may iuftly bee called to witneffe, who found more Citties and fumptuofitic in that 
little kingdome of Pew, which lay fide by fide to the Eaft India, then in all his other 
trauailesand vndertakings. Forin ^Alexanders time learning and greatnefle had not 
trauailed fo farre to the Weft as Rome \ Alexander efteeming of Italic but as a bar=~7 
barousCountrie, and of ifwwasofa Village. But it was .B^y^hat ftood in his 10 
eye, and the fame of the Eaft pierced his eares. And if we looke as farre as the Sun- 
riling, and heare Paul its Venetm what he rcporteth of the vttermoft Angle and Ijland 
thereof, we mail findethat thofe Nations hauefentout,and not receiued,lent know- 
ledge, and not borrowed it from the Weft. For the farther Eafl^ (to this Jay ) the 
more ciuill, the farther Weft the more faluage. And of the Ifle of Japan (now Zipin- 
garij yenetws maketh thisreport. IncoUreligioniJiteris, & fapienti&funt addiclijsimi, 
& veritatisindtgatoresacerrimi; nihilillisfrequentiusoratione, quam (morenoslro) fa- 
cris in delttbris ex er cent : vnum cogno fount Prinapem , -vnum Deum adorant , The dan- 
ders are exceedingly addHied to religionjetters, and Philojophie, andmoft diligent fearchers ■ • 
out of truth : there is nothing among them more frequent ihenprayer,nhichthey -vfe in their ap 
chm ekes, after the manner ofchriftians. They acknowledge one King , and worjbip ones 
Cod. The antiquitie, magnificence, ciuilitie, riches, fumptuous buildings, andpol- 
licie in gouerncment, is reported to be fuch by thofe who haue beene employed in- 
to thofe parts, as it feemeth to exceede (in thofe formerly named, and diuers other 
particulars) all other Kingdomes of the world. 

t-- V. 

The third argument , From thetconderfull 'refrjlance which Semiramis 

found in the East Indies. 3 © 

BVt for a third argument, and alfo of a treble ftrength to the reft, I lay the inuati- . 
on of Semiramis before the indifferent and aduifed Reader : who may confidcr M~ ~ 
in what age fhee liued, and how fbone after the worlds new birth fhee gathered her 
Armie (as Diodorus siculusoxxt ofctefras reporteth) of more then three Millions to 
z. 1 y inuade India, to which he adioyneth alfb 5 00000. Horfe , and 1 00000. Waggons : 
whereof if we beleeuebut a third part, it fhall fiiffice to proue that India was the firft 
planted and peopled Countrie after the floud. Now as touchinglhetime wherein 
iliee liued : All Hiftorians content , that fhee was the wife of Ninus ; and the moft 
approued Writers agree, that 2y»«# was the Sonne of .BA*, and Beltts of Nimrod, aq 
that Wjmrodwas the Sonne ofCufi , Cufh of Cham, and Cham of Noah. And at filch 
time as Nimrodczmt into shinar, he was then a great Nation , as by the building of 
thcCittieandTowerofftjAf/mayappeare; and being thenfb multiplyed and in- 
creafed, the two deferents eaft bet weene Nimrod and Semiramis, brought foorthin 
that time thofe multitudes, whereof her Armie was compofed. Let vs then fee 
with whome fhee encountred in that warre with this her powerfull Armie : euen 
with a multitude, rather exceeding, then equalling her owne, conducted by Stauro- 
hates King of 'India beyond Indus ; of whofe multitudes this is the witneffe of Died. 
Siculus. Stavrobates, auitis maioribus quam qua erant Semiramidis copi/s. 
Stavrobates gathering together greater troups then thofeofS emiramis. If then jo 
thefe numbers of Indians had beene encreafed but by a Colonie fent out from Shinar, 
(and that alfo after Babel was built , which no doubt tooke fome time in the perfor- 
mance) this encreafe in the Eaft, and this Armie ofstaurobates muft haue been made 
of ftone,orfbmwhatelfe by miracle. For as the numbers which Semiramis gathered 

might 



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might eafily grow vpm that time, from lb great a troupe as ■tfmrodbvoivht with 
him into Babylonia (as (hall be demonftrated hereafter in the ftot ic of if raelffo could 
not any fuch time, by any multiplication natural!, produce fo many bodies of men, 
. as werein the Indian armie victorious ouer Semiramis, if the Colonics km thither had' 
becne lb late as Aife/ouerturned, and the confufion of languages. For if we allow 
6$.yezKs time after the floud, before Nhnrod was borne : of which, 3o.yearesto 
C^» ere h e begat S^fc, after whom hee had Haiulab, Sabtah, Raamah, and Sabtccha : 
and then 30. yeares to Baamah, ere hee begat Sheki and Dedan, both which were 
borne before Nmrod: and fiuc yeares to his fiue elder brothers, which make 6 k .and 
13 then twice 30. yeares for two generations more, asforT^mrod, sheba and Dedan 
with others, to beget their (bnnes ^and that a third generation might growevp 
which makes in all 125. yeares , there will then remaine fixe yeares to haue beene 
fpent in trau tiling from the Eaft, ere they arriued in shinar in the yeare after the 
floud 131. And (b the followers of Nmrodm^hx bee of mffirient multitude. But 
as for thofe which make him to haue arriued at shinaar in the yeare 101 : and the 
confufion to haue beene at Pelegs birth, thefe men doe all by miracle : they beset 
whole Nations without the helpe of time, and build Nimrods Tower in the aver- 
and not on thofe low and mariih groundes (which require found foundations) in the' 
Plaines of shinaar. For except that huge Tower 1 were built iri a daie , there could 
be no confufion in that yeare 1 o 1 . or at Pelegs birth. And therefore it is farre more, 
probable, thatiNjmro d viurpcd regall authorityin the 131. yeare after the floud 
(according to Berofrsf and thaFtheworke oFjBabel Jafted fourtie yeares 1 (according' 
to Glyc.isjhommibusin ea fcrficiendatotis \o.anmsincajjumlaborantibw ■ <M-n labou- 
ring invaine 40. yeares tofimfh it. By which account it fills out, that it was 1 70 
yeares after the floud.ere a Colomewas fentintoEaJl India ^ which graunted (the one 
being the maine body, and the other but a Troupe taken thence) itcan hardly bee 
beheued, that Siaurobates could'haue exceeded Semiramism numbers • who beins 
then EmprefTe of all that part of the world , gathered the molt ofNations into one 
bodic. - ' • J > 



Ctn.io.f, 



30 



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Glyc.m Geti.i^i 
de Tunis ex* 
ft'utHme. fol, 
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The fourth Argum. from diners confiderationsintheperfon <?/N o a h. 

F °^%'" '! °,° way P robabIci > th:lt A&«*,(irho knew the world before the. floud, 
*; and had liued therein the long time of <5ob.yeare5,was all that fpace M. yeares 
alter the floud without any certaine habitation } Nb,it will fall bur,and better agree 
withreaion, that Nmrod was but the'eonducterof thofe people, by No.ih dc&mei 

40 and appointed to fill and inhabite that middle part of the -.earth and the wefterne 
world 1 j (which trauailes Noah put.ouer to yqngand able bodies 1 ) and that Noah him- 
icltethen couered with many yeares planted himfelfeinthefarne place which God 
nad afhgned him : which was where he firft came downe oiitof the Arle from the 
waters : For it is written, that after 2\^cam'e ; downe out of the Arke he planted 4 
vineyeard, and became a husbandman : whofchufineffe was iodrefTeahci manure 
the earth, and not to range ouer fo many parts of the world , as from Armenia, into 
Arabiafa-lix, where hee fhould (ifthetraditionbefound) haue left certaine Colonies: 
thence into Africa towards Triton; then into Spaine, where they fay he fetled other 
compames,& built Cittics after the names of N^ela and Neeglahis fbns wiucs : from 

jo thence into italic, wherethey fayhee found his (bnncoW; the Saturneof ^Ainpt 
who had corrupted the people and fubieefs of Gomer in his abfence : with whom 
Noah (as they make the ftorie) had patience for three yeares ; but then findina no a- 
mendment they fay hee banilht him out of Italic. Thefe be but the fancies of Bero- 

- Jus Annimus, a plaine imitation of the Grecian fables. For let euery rcafonable man 

conceiue 



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conceiue, what it was to trauailc farrein fuch a forrcft as the World was, when after 
fb great a rotting of the earth by the floud the fame lay waft and ouer-growne for 
1 30. or iifo.yeares, and wherein there could hardly be found either path or pat 
fage through which men were able to creepe for woods, bufb.es and bryars that in 
thofe yeares were growne vp. 

And there are fo many realbns, prouing that i^oah neuer came into the valley of 
Shinaar, as we need not fufpect his pafTage into Italicor spume : For Mab who was 
Father of all thofe Nations,a man reuerenced both for his authoritie,knowled°e,ex- 
pcriencc and pietie, would neuer haue permitted his children and iffues to hauc.vn- 
dertakenthatvnbeleeuing prefumptuous worke of Babel. Rather by his prefence 10 
and preualent pcrfwafions he would haue bound their hands from fo vaine labours, 
and by the authoritie which he receiued euen«from God himfelfe, hee would haue 
held them in that awfull fiibiection , as whatfbeuer they had vaincly concerned or 
Feared, yet they durft not haue difbbayed the perfbnall commandement of him, 
who in the beginning had a kinde of Regal authoritie ouer his children and people. 
Certaihely, T^oab knew right well, that the former deftrudion of mankinde was by 
therfifelues purchased through crueltieand difbbedience ; and that to diftruftGod, 
and to raife vp building againft his Almightie power , was as much as in them lay, a 
prouocation of God to lay on them the fame,if not a more fharpe affliction.Where- 
fore, there is no probabilitie , that euer he came fb farre Weft as Babylonia., but ra- 20 
ther,that he ferit thofe numbers which cameinto Sbmaar(bemg the greateft troupe 
becaufe they had the greateft part of the world to plant) vnder ^(imrod, or thofe vp- 
pon whomhevfurped. ^auclerus and Cdejlinus take the teftimonie of Methodius 
Bifhdp of Tyre for currant.that there were three Leaders of the people after their en- 
treafe (to wit) Nimrod, Suphene, and Iotfan : of which Nimrod commaunded the if- - 

I '■ f\iesofcbam,Ioffanoi'Sem,andSupheneoflaphet. This opinion I cannot iudgeofj & 

! although I w ill not doubt, but that lb great a worke as the worlds plantation,could 

; - liot be effected without order and conduction. 

Of theSonnes of Sem : loffart Hauilah , and Opbir, are efpecially noted to haue 
dwelt in the Eoft India. Thereft of Sems iffues had alfb the Regions oi PerfiaznA 30 
theother adioyning to Indus, and held alfb a part ofchaldaa for a time : for ^bra- 
ham inhabited Vr, till hee was thence called by God ; and whether they were of the 
Sonnes oflottan, or ofall the reft a certaine number (Cham and his iffue only excep- 
ted) that Noab kept with himfelfe,it cannot be knowne. Of which plantation I fhall 

t fpeake at large in the Chapter following. 

Now another reafbn which moues me to beleeue, that 3$oah flayed in the Eaft far 
away from all thofe that came into shiriar,is that UWofesdoth not in any word make 
mention of Noah in all the ftorie of the Hebrewes , or among any of thofe Nations 
which contended with them. And i\fa^,being the Father ofall mankindc.and the 
chofenferuant of God, was too principall a perlbn, to be either forgotten or negle- 1 
fled, had he not (in refpecl of his age and wearifbme experience ofthe world) with 
"S drawnchimfelfe^ndreftedapartwithhisbeftbeloued, giuing himfelfe to the fer- 
uice and contemplation of God and hcauenly thinges, after he had directed his ch il- 
\ dren to their deftined portions. For hee landed in a warme and fertile foile, where 
hee planted his Vineyard, and dreft the earth; after which, andhisthanks-giuing 
to God by facrifice, hee is not remembred in the Scriptures, becaufe hee was fo farre 
away from thofe Nations of which Mofes wrote ; which were the Hebrewes chiefly, 
^nd their enemies and borderers. 



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f. VII. 



Ofthefenfeeffeoprmonof A n n , v s *fcc«*****£«, Bwosvwk/^ t -/ V ' ' r ^ 
Arkerejiedvpon pontes Caj}y wArmema, andyefvpon Gordta ' } 

which <tre three bimdredmiles distant alforn Armenia, ' ' ' 
and jet in Scythia. 



ILs ST that WC CXaminethe Arguments and authorities of Frier An- (^ \ 
twsi who in his Commentaries vpon Berefm and others laboureth nv,m-,iln,w? i 

which mounta.ncs feparate ArmenUftom. the vooer MtjL JaaT { ^\ Ca h i 

. ±& s n f d bc '"" la ," '? *^**3csasftass*sa 

no other lhifttovnitethe/iopinions,butbyvnitinetho^ftr rP ^ft-l nccnam 

together. Toeffe^ whiehhehathfoundno^therfnue^ 

men with errom- which hauccarefullyouerfeene Zre M £m tf" 8 *,* 015 
^hie,^^ 

'f'f^hil^ 

we lhall hndenothing in them to helpe Anmus witball • for in thofp fh* m„ * 

=oC #;/ ftandfeuendegree S t the E a/ofthe G ^: ■ whSm J^STSrf 

I an v w «rf Dui M iritaaflfe G*0 the prcenLrs of 2 Vrlri ^A 

SKfiSft ^J«^^!^^ And herein truly I<5* within 
that thofe Reg.ons called ftMK< and now flfe**; and by feme Wrters Sri 2 

ncth1 ni tX 

t cRi "r? ^" ,ed ^f'-Vtakingnameofthemount a ine^;.neare 
T h- 1 1^ v ^ ,ldbec ™ fchis Authourc^helpethhim inpart (to wit 
l n. tin f9M» mankmde was rcftored after the great floud, i * o yearcs before ^' 

,oS f ra ' t0 8 Cthe r ,nrhcre P rti «onofc^hiswordes/and writes A^»S2 "^ 
J ^ F ? r ^ fe ^ or ^'^vndoubtedlyvnderthemounta,n e so Xt 

<^on which ,ornearewhichiti S moftprobabkthatthe^firfttoSron^ P/0 -^^'^ 
nd from thofe Eaft parts (according to Lfes) cameall thofe companies^ c er^ 
ftedthcTowerofe^/in5&»^orS^»M. V "'^nichere- 6ct ., m , 

But now the beff authorise which Ami»t hath is out of nhdorm ■ where he hath 

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read, that the Scythians were originally ^/Irmentans, taking name a Scytha Rege eo- 
rum, from Scytha their King. But (inaword) we may fee his yanitic, or rather (in- - 
deede) his folfhood in eking this place. For Biodorm a moftapproued and diligent 
Authour beginneth in that place with thefe wordes. Fabulantur Scytha, The Scythi- 
ans fable : and his Interpreter in the table of that worke giueth this title to that very 
Chapter. Scytharum ortgo &fuccefiu,fabuU, The original/ andfucceffe of the Scythians, 
a fable. And (indecde) there needes no great difproofe hereof, fince Ptolomie doth 
directly delineate ScythiaSaga, or Sace, and lets them in 1 30. degrees of longitude: 
and the Per fans (faith HerodotmJczW all the Scythians,Sacx, which Plinie confirmeth : 
£,«.M7. for in refpecl: that thefe Sac a (faith Plinie Jare the next Scythians to the P<r/fo;M,there- i o 
fore they giue all the reft that name. Now that any Nation in ^Armenia can neigh- 
bour the Perfians, there is no man beleeueth. But this fuppofed Scythia Araxea'm 
Armenialyeth'm 78. degrees of longitude (that is) 42. degrees diftant from the 
Suez, andtheCouiitricabout^<«x«P/« , i?w;Vcallethc<'///^»f and Soduccne and Sa- 
capene, without any ro cntion of Scythia at all : and yet all thofe which are or were re- 
puted Scythians, either within mam or without, to the number of 1 00. feuerall Na- 
7ab.Af>*.7.& 8 tions arc ty Ptolomie prccifely fet downe. 

But to come to thofe later Authours , whereof Ibme haue written , others haue 
feene a great part of thofe North-eaft Regions , and fearched their antiquities with 
great diligence : Firft, CMariw T^igerbounclethScythia within Imam, in this manner: as 
{for Scythia without thefe mountaines is alio beyond our purpofc.) Scythiaintra. 
Imaum montem ea eft, qu<e propria vocabulo Gaffaria hoc tempore dicitur : ab Occafu Sarma- 
tia Aftatica : ab Oriente Imao monte : a Septentrione terra incognita : i CWcridix Stccis, 
Segdianis, Margian'is, "vf%. oliia Ox a amnis in Hyrcanum mare exeunt is 5 & partem ipftut »' 
maris hinc -vffy ad Rhafluminis oftiaterminatur , Scythiawithin the mountains Imaus U 
that part of the world, whkh in their mnefpeech is at this time called Gaffaria ;and the fame 
is bounded on the Weft fide by Sarmatia Aftatka, (or ofAfiaJon the Eaft by the Imaan moun- 
taines : on the North by vnknovme lands : on the South by the SaccA ( which are the Sacs ) 
the Sogdiani, and the Margiani, to the mouth of Oxus, falling into the Hy r can Sea, and by a. 
mn o^voka.t^tofthefameSeaMfarrea4thmoHthefRha .3° 

Now if Niger lets all Sarmatia Aftatica, to the Weft of 'Scythia, then Sarmatia (qua 
magna fine regie est , (jr qiu inmmcrasnationes complectitur , Which is a great Region, 
comprehending innumerable "Nations, (faith Niger, much of it being betweene Scythi* 
and Armenia, doth fufficiently warrant vs, that Armeniaan be no part of 59^/,* j 
and to make it moreplaine,hedifTeuereth Sarmatia it felfe from any part of Armenia, 
by the Regions of Colchis , ibena, Albania , which hee leaueth on the right hand of 
Sarmatia, and yet makes Sarmatia but the Weft bound of Scythia. 
And for Paulus Venetm, he hath not a word of Armenia among the Tartarian, or 
( °mtm$iip Scythian Nations ; neither doth his fellow Frier Iohn Plancarpio (cited by Vincentw 
Tjic dtirl* ™ his defcription of Scythia) make any mention of Armenia ; neither doth Hay tonus 40 
aidmjberi!, a n Armenian borne, ofthe bloud of thofe Kings, (though afterward a Monke) euer 
Albamli « t't- ^knowledge himfelfe for a Tartarian , or of the Scythian races defended .-though 
'Zmpumit. he write that ftorie at large, gathered by Nicholaus Salcuni, and (by the commande- 
syi«J»jj«.jo. ment f popedement the fifth) inthcyeare 1307.publifb.cd, 

Neither doth Mathi.ts a Michou (a Canon of Cracoma in Polonia) a Sarmatian borne, 
and that trauailed a great part of Sarmatia Aftatica, finde Armenia any way within 
the compafle of Tartar ia, Scythia , or Sarmatia -, and yet no man (whole trauailes are 
extant) hath obfenied fb much of thofe Regions as he hath done : prouing and dif- 
prouing many thinges , heretofore fubieft to difputc. And among others hee bn- 
. rieth that ancient and receiued opinion. That out of the mountaines Riphai, and 50 
Hyperberei'm Scythia, fyringthe Riuersof Tanais or Don , FolgaotEdel; prouingby 
vnanfwerablc experience , that there are no fiich mountaines inrerum mtura ^ and 
(indeede) the heads and fountaines of thole famous Riuers,are now by the trade of 
Mtfaiiiakao-wm to eucry Merchant,and that they arife out of LakeSjloWjWOoddie, 

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121 



and manfli grounds. The Riuer of Tanoii or Zfc»,arifeth to the South of the Citric 
Tu//a,lome twentic Engliffi milcs.out ofa Lake called hvanoivefero in the great wood 
Okwkzk&tcsaxiqiphmdies. Volga, which P 'tolomte cals R}m, and the Tartirs call £ 
«W rifethout ota Lake called B ww, in the great wood /W/'^v: from which 
Lake the two other famous Riuers flow of Boryfthenes (now Meter) and Dfuin-i or 
ihmfc. And this learned Poloman doth in this fort bound the Europe sirmatia 
In Sarmatix of Europe are the Regions ofRufiians, Lithuanians , Mouians and 
thofeadioynmg bounded on the Weft by the Riuer of fgfi , the name perchance 
mi/printed Vifla for Viftula, a Riuer which parts G^w« and &m«tii : and for the 
i Eaftborder he nameth To* or Don. Sarmatia ^ffiHu hecutteth from Europe by 
thefirne Rnier of T^and the c^» Sea,to with-hold it from ftretchina farther 
baft: this Afian Sarmatia being part of that Jgflfe* which i>Mtt called? rirtfo 
mtralmaummontem,ScythiamthmthemoHnUine Imaiis. Andthehme LMatkts M 
ebon farther affirmcth, that the Scythians (which Frier JMd would make i» 
««w; came not into Strmati* j/utica it felfe abouc three hundred and a few odde 
yeares before his owne time : thefe be his wordes. Confiat earn elje rentem nou2 X 
aduentitiam apartiius Orient is, (mutatis f -dOmJ pauloplus Mine trecentis annis . Afa 
S«rnatiammgreJ]a m ,Itumamfeft(SKth\^[^ 

tsalaieplanted^ation, eomefromthe coasts of ihe Eaji .-from ivhcncethey entredinto A 
%oJia,andgatnewfeatesalitde m orethentbrechundredyearesJInce: For (indeede) before 
that timethe Gethesor P*«/*a inhabited Sarmatia Afiatica. And this MathiAmd in 
theyeare i ; r r and this bis d./courfe of Sarmatia was printed KAuguftam the year 
1 5 o6. as Broker* nn his c hronologie witneffeth. Now thefe Scythians ((^hc\ 
came from the Eaft, for in the Eaft it was that the Arkeoi'Noah refted : and the Z 

^^werethofepeoplewhichliucdattheNorthfooteofthofemountainesof 
Taurus or Ararat, where they encounter orbeginne to mixe themfelues with the 
great Imaut. And were there no other tcftimonie then the generall defcription of 
the earth now extant , and the mta&eotPuImie, ftilplaine, that betweene all 
parts oL4r„and Scythia, there arenot only thofe three Regions o? Colchis, ibe- 

30 m ^nd^^buttheC^&aronthcEaftfcoreofwhichS^butiiotontli- 
Weft or on that part wnich anyway toucheth <**««<, there arc (indeede) a Nati- 
on ot Scythians (called ^««j betweene laxartus and Aft* ; but what are thefe Scy- 
t™™™™yArm«,orScy^ 
the Scythians of Europe ? . ■•■■■ ■ 



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t- VIII. 

The fift argument , The Vine must grow naturally neare the placewhere^ 
the Arkc^ refted. 



T2ft *"'% I^t&confideiatroii of this part ofthe Text, rkNo* h^- g „, 9 , , ■ 

nt, r n T W ' We ? aU findc thaC the fruit of chc Vmeor Rayfin did notgrow 
o«ura%mthatpart f:^« W) where this refting ofthe Arke was fUppofed : for 
ijtfte Vine was a ftranger in Italie and F™^,and brought from other Countries thi- 
t Z V $ "5 Pjobablc that it grew naturally in Armenia^™ a farre colder Coun- 

JftA? ' J " ? U , ght Vlnes into Frmce > :lnd ^ tow « int0 L «« m ■■ Yea fmb , s a ,i A 

atfuchtmeas^^andtheG^inuaded/^, therewere feworuo Vinelin ^f * 
J-rance. bo r fi.th iV/rf ( W.inthelife ofC4m&»; the G^forcmained betweene the 
j^HMrand the^te, neare vnto the 5««« f) where they continued alone time vn 
jo t.lltheydrunke W ine,wh.chwasfirftbro U ghtthemoutof Italie, and afo hev 
tafted thereoftheyhafted toinhabite that Countrie, which brought forth 3 
pkafant fruit : Co as it appeared that the Plant ofthe Vinewasnot natur aS n 
2^-, but from itahe brought thither, as by Saturne from elfewhere mtS 

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Now it is manifeft that 2{oah trauailed not farre ro ftekeout the Vine. For the 
plantation thereof is remembred, before there was any counfaile how to difpoft of 
the world among his children : and the firft thing he did was totill the ground, and 
to planta Vineyard, after hisfacrifice and thanks-giuing to God ; and wherefoeuer 
the Arke rafted, there did the Vine grow naturally. From whence ic doth no where 
appeare that he trauailed farre ; for the Scriptures teach vs, that he was a Hufband^ 
man, and not a Wanderer. 



Gen.iS.i4. 



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com. 



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\. IX. 16 

An/were to an obieffion out of the wordes of the Text. The Lord feat tered them 
from thence vpon the face of the whole earth. 

ANd that all the children ofl^oah came together into Shinar, it doth not ap- 
peare, fauing that it may be inferred out of theft wordes (from thence) becauft 
it is written : So the Lord fcattered them from thence vpon all the earth ; which hath 
no other ftnfe, but that the Lord fcattered them (to wit) thoft that built this 
Tower: for thoft were from thence difperftd into all the regions of the North and 
South.andto the Weftward. And by theft wordes ofSybtlla (as they are conuer- 
ted)it leemeth that all came not together into shinaar, lor they haue this limitation. 19 
Quidam eorum turrem tdifcarunt altifimam , quaff cr earn caelum effent afcenfuri , Cer- 
taint of them built a molt high Tower, as if they meant thereby to haue Jcaledthe heauens. 



t. X. 
^A~n anfwere to the vbieEHonfiom the name of Ararat, taken for Armenia, : and 
the heighth of the hiUes there-j. 

BVt before I conclude this part , it is necefTarie to fte and cohfideir , what part of 
Scripture, and what reafon may be found out to make it true or probable , that 3 6 
the Arke of 2\(f ah was forfaken by the waters on the mountaines of Armenia. For 
the Text hath only theft wordes. The Arke retted on (orvpon) the mountaines of 
Ararat or Armenia faith the marginal noteof the Geneua,the chaldman Paraphrajl cals 
it Kardu ; of which the higheft hath the name ofLubar, faith Epiphantus. Now this 
Ararat (which the S<?/>teg//tf doenotconuertat all, but keepe the fame word) is ta- 
ken tobeamountaine of Armenia, becauft Armenia it feife had anciently that 
name : fo as firft out of the name, and ftcondly out of the heighth (which they fup- 
poft exceeded all other) is the opinion taken, That the Arke firft fate thereon. 

But theft fuppofitions haue no foundation : for neither is Ararat of Armenia a- 
lone, neither is any part,or any of thoft mountaines of equall ftature to many other 40 
mountaines of the world; and yet it doth not follow, thatthe^/r&r found the 
higheft mountaine of all other to reft on : for the Plaincs were alio vncouered , be 
fore "Upah came out of the Arke. Now 4f there were anyagreement among Wri- 
ters of this Ararat, and that they did not differ altogether therein , wee might giue 
more credit to the conceit. For in the bookes of the Sybils it is written , that the 
mountaines of Ararat are in Phrygia , vpon which- it was fuppoftd that the Arke^> 
flayed after the floud. And the better to particularize the place and ftate of theft 
mountaines , and to proue them in Phrygia , and not Armenia , they are placed 
where the Cittie oiCcelenes was afterward built. Likewiftinthefamedefcription 
ftiee maketh mention ofCMJtrfyas, a Riuer which runneth through part of Phrygia, 
andafterwardioynethitftlfewiththe Riuer xJfylaeander, which is farre from the 
Gorduan mountaines in Armenia. Wee may alio finde a great miftaking in lofephus, 
< though out of Berofus, who is in effect the Father of this opinion ) that Io- 
fephm fets Ararat betweene Armenia and Parthia toward Cddiabene-j , and 

affirmcth 



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affirmcth withall,thatin the ProuinccofcVw? by others A'airosmd Amos, focal- 
led byrca/bn that the waters haue from thence no deftent, norifTucout, thepco- 
ple vaunt that they had in thole dayes reftrucd (brae pecccs of Z(oahs Arke. But 
Farthia touchcth no where vpon Armenia, for Armenia bordercth Adiabene , a Pro- 
miKiofi^0r'/a:fo that all OMedia and a part oF^Jffyria is betwecneP^r/'feand 
Armenia. Now whereas the diftoucric of the mountaines Cor dim was firft bor- 
rowed out of Berofui by Iofephw, yet the Text which lofefhiu citcth out of Bcro- 
Jtt-s, differs farre from the wordes of that Bero/us, which wandereth vp anddowne 
in theft dayes, fct out by Annius. For Berofus cited by lofefhus hath theft wordes. 
1 Fertur & nauigij hums furs in Armenia, afudmontem Corduorumfuferejfe, & quofdam 
bitumen indeabrajum j'ecum re portartLj , quo vice amuleti loci hums homines vti folent, 
(which is) Jt is reforteddfo that a fart of this jhif is yet remaining in Armenia, ifonthe 
Cordixan mountaines ; and that diners doe fcrapc from it the bitumen or Pitch and carry - 
ing itwith them, they zfe it in Jleade of an amulet. But Annius his Edition of the frag- 
ment of BerofusxCcth theft wordes. Nameleuata abaquisin Cordis montis vertice eiui- 
euit , cuius adhuc dicitur aliqua fars ejfe , ejr homines ex ilia bitumen toller e quo maxime v* 
timtur adexpiationem, For the whole Arke being lifted vp by thewaters , resieden the top 
of the Gordiianmountaines , ofvhich it is reported that feme farts remainc , andthatmen 
■ doe carry thence of the bitumen to purge by facrifice therewith : ft as in theft two Texts 
ao (bcfidcsthc difference of wordes) thenameisdiuerflywrittcn. Thcancicntfty0/«.r 
writes cW/.« with a (c) and the Fragment Gorduu 'with a (G-.) the one that the 
Bitumenisvftdforaprcftruatiucagainftpoyfonorinchantment; the other in (a- 
critice; And ifitbe laid that they agree in the gencrall,yctit is reported by neither 
from any ccrtainc knowledge, nor from any approucd Aurhour : for one of them v- 
ftth the word (fertur) the other (dicitur) the one, that ft it is reported, the other ) 
that foitisjaid; and both but by hcarefty , and therefore ofno authoritie nor ere- C 
dit. For common bruit is ft infamousan Hiftorian , as wift men neither report af 
ter it, nor giue credit to any thing they rcceiuc from it. 
Furthermore, theft mountaines which Ptolomie cais GordUi, arc not thoftmoun- 
30 taines which rnmftlfe giueth to Armenia, but he callcth the mountaines of 'Armenia 

Mofchici. Theftbc his owne words : Montes Armenia nominantur if ,qui<JMofchici af- Vt,.Afu.ub. 
pelkntur,quiprotenduntur-uf^ ad fuferiacentem partem Bonn Caffadocim ; rjr mom qui 
Paryardes dicitur, The mountaines of Armeniaaretheywbich are called CWofchici, which 
Jlretch along to the higher fart of Ptmtus of theCappadocians : alfo the hill 'which is called 
Paryardes; which mountaines Plinie^ callcth l'ariedri, and both which lye to the n»ie. c9 
North oFGordidoxBaris, in 43 . and 44. and a halfc; and the Gordizan mountaines 
in 39. and a halfe : from the Northermoft of which did the Georgians take their 
names, who were firft Gordians and then Georgians, whoamidftallthcftrengthof 
the greateft Infidels of Perfra and Turkie , doe ftill remainc Chriflians . Concerning 
4° the other fuppofitions, that the mountaines ox'Gordiai, otberwife Boris Kardu or Lu- 
har, (which Ptolomie callcth Togordiaion) arc the higheftofthe world,the fame is ab- 
folutely falft. - , 



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OfCaucafus , and diners farre higher hils then the Armenian, 

TC Or the beft Cofmografhers with other, that haue ftcne the mountaines oFArme- 
•*- »M,findc them farre inferiour, and vnder-ftt to diuers other mountaines euen in 
jo that part of the world, and clfewherc : as the mountaine Athos betwecne OMacedon 
and T/W, which Ptolomie cals Olympus,nowa\kd Zaois, (faith Caftaldus) is farre 
furmounting any mountaine that euer hath beenefeene in Armenia : for it caftcth 
fliade three hundred furlongs , which is ftuen and thirtie miles and vpwards : of 
which Plutarch. Athos adnmbrat later a Zemni.e bonis, Athos (Imdoweth the Cow of Lew- T!u,m '- &»$>> 

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124. The fir/l'Bookeofthefirfi part Cw.av.j.§.\o.\.i2, 

nos. Alfb the mount of Olympus in Thejfalie, is laid to be of that heighth , as neither 
thewindes,cloudes,or raine oucrtop it. Againe, the mountaine of Antandrus'm 
Myfia, not farre from Ida, whence the Riuer Scamandrus floweth , which runneth 
through Troy, is alio of a farre more admiration then any in Armenia , and may bee 
fecne from Confiantinople. There are alfo in ^Mauritania nearc the Sea, the famous 
mountaines of Atlas, of which Herodotus. Extat in hoc mari CMons, cui ncmen Atlas, 
itafublimis effe dicitur, vt ad illius verticem ocult mortalium peruemre non pofiint , Vpon 
this coast there is a mountaine called Atlas, whofe heighth is [aid to befuch, as the eye of no 
mortal! man can difeerne the top thereof. And ifwemay beleeue Arifiotle, then are all 
thefe inferiour to Caucafus, which hee maketh the molt notorious both for breadth 
and heighth. Caucafus mons omnium maximus, qui afttuum adortumfuntr, acumrne attfr 
latitudine,cuius iuga a Sole radiantur vffy adconticinium ab vrtu : ejr iterum ab occafu, Cau- 
cafus (faith Ariftotle) is the greateft mountaine both for breadth and heighth of all thofe in 
the North-east, whofe tops are lightnedby the Sunne beames,vffy ad conticinium (which is 
jfaith Macrobius J betweene the firft crowing after midnight andthebreakeofday /Others 
affirme that the top of this mountaine holds the Sunne beames when it is darke in 
the Valley; but I cannot beleeue either : for the higheft mountaine of the world 
knowneisthatofrfwrc/£intheC,»M>7tf : which^ilthough it hath nothing to the 
Weftward of it for 1000. leagues together but the Ocean Sca,yet doth it not enioy 
the Sunnes companic at any fiich late houres. Befides, thefe mountaines which A- to 
rijlotle calleth Caucaft, are thofe which feparatc Colchis from Iberia^ though (indeed) 
Caucafus doth diuide both Colchis, iberia, and Albania, from Sarmatia : for he acknow- 
ledged that the Riuer of P hafts rifeth in the fame mountaine , which himfelfe cal- 
leth Caucafus, and that Phafis if nngcth from thofe hilles which funder Colchis from 
i£<rra,falling afterward into Euxinus: which Riuer (it is manifefl) yeeldeth it felfe to 
the Sea two degrees totheNotth of Trapeuis (now TrabefundaJ howfoeuer Merca- 
for bring it from Peryardes. 



t. XIX 

Ofdiuers incongruities, if in this Jlorie wefhould take Ararat 
for Armenia. 



3° 



SO as it doth firft appeare, that there is.no certainetie what mountaine Ararat 
was = for the bookes of the Sybils fet it in Phrygia .- and Berofus in Armenia : and 
as for £»•«/#* authoritie, thofe men haue great want of proofes that borrow from 
thence. 

Secondly, that Saris was the higheft hill, and therefore moft likely that the <^frke 
grounded thereon, the afTertion and fuppofition haue equall credit : forthereare 
many hils which exceede all thofe of Armenia ; and if they did not, yet it doth not 40 
follow (as is before written) that the o^Hr fhould fit on the higheft. 

Thirdly, it cannot be proued that there is any fiich Hill in ^Armenia, or inrerum 
natura, as Baris: for Baris (faith Hierome) fignihcth high Towers:andfbmayallhigh 
Ms be called indifferently ; and therefore wee may better giue the name of Baris to 
the hils of Caucafus (out of which Indus rifeth)then to any hils of Armenia.Yot thofe 
of Caucafusin the Eaft,.are vndoubtedly thehigheft ot'Afia. 

Fourthly, the Authoursthemfeluesdoenot agree in what Region the moun- 
taines Gordtd ftand:for Ptolomie diftinguifheth the mountaines of Armenia from the 
Gordidan, and calleth thofe of Armenia CMofchici and Paryardes , as aforefaid. Now 
Paryardes is featedneare the middle of Armenia, out of which on the Weft fide ri- jo 
feth. Euphrates, and out of theEaft fide Araxis : and the mountaines <JMofihici are 
thofe hils which difioyne Colchis, iberia, and Albania (now the Countrie of the Geor- 
gians) from Armenia, 

I- XIII. 



fjtf, 






1% ■ " 



f 












Vrt 



t~j 



~ 



■^ 



Chap.j.S.io.ja}. ofthe Hijlorie of the World. 



12? 



flfc 



f. XIII. 

of the contrarie fituation of Armenia to the place 'Media the Text : andthatit isno 
maruaile that the fame ledge ofhils running from Armenia to India Should 
keepe the Jame name all along .- andeuen m India he 
called Ararat, 
'"'' . • ' 

T Aftly, we muft blow vp this.mountaine Ararat it felfe , or elfe wee muft digge ic 
•'-' downe, and carrie it out at Armenia ; or finde it elfewhere,and in a warmer coun- 
10 trie, and (withall)fet it Eaft from Shinaar: or elCc wee lhall wound.the. truth it felfe 
■ with th e weapons o four owne vaine imaginations! ' 

Therefore to mak~e~the miftaking open to euery eye , weemuftvnderftand, that 
Ararat (named by CAtofes) is not any one hill, fo called, no more then any one hill a- 
mong thofe mountaines which dimde Italie from France is called the Alp es .- or any 
one among thofe which part France from Spaine is the Pyreman ; but as thefe being 
continuations of many hilskeepe one name in diuers Countries - fo all that long 
ledge of mountaines, which Plmie callcth by one name Taurus, and Ptolomie both rMfrb te 
Taurus, ^iphates , Coatras, Coronus , Sariphi, vntill they encounter and croffe th? ^rip.km of 
mountaines ofthe great Imaus, are ofonegenerall name, andareealled themoun- f^W* 
20 tames of 'Ararat or Armenia, becaufe from thence or thereabout they feeme to anie 
Soallthefemountainesof^™*,*, Armenia, Corax^ Capj,Mofchici,Amazomcl 
Hemochi , Scythia , ( thus diuerfly called by Flime and others') Ptolomie cals by one' 
name Caucafus,\ym % between the Seas Caftmm and EuxmusizszK thofe mountaines 
which cutafundcr Amenca,enm from the new Kingdome of Qranadoxo the ftreieht 
of mgelkn are by one name called Andes. And as thefe mountaines of^^runne 
Eaft and Weft : fo doe thofe maruailous mountaines of Imaus ftretch themfelues 
North and South ; and beingofhke extent well neare are called by the name of I- 
maipemnv Phme calleth thefe former hils 7W,and Mofa the hih oi Ararat The 
reafonoffeuerall names gmen by />*Wwas thereby the better to diftinouiflithe 
50 great Regions and K.ngdomcs, which thefe great mountaines bound and duTeuer - 
as ^rmenia,Mefrpoiamia,AjJyna,<JHedu,Sufiana, Perfia, Parthia, Caramama, ^iril 
Mtrgiana Baclria,Sogdiana and Paropamfus :h^m^\\ thefe Kingdomes either on 
the North or South Iideofthem. For all the mountaines of A fa ( both the lefTe 
and thegreater) hauethreegenerall names, (to wit) Taurus, lmaus,md Caucafus.-znd 
they rece.ue other titles as they feuer and diuide particular placesand regions. For 
theiemoun aines which Cunder Cilicia from the reft of Afa the leffe on the North 
iide,arecalledr*«m ; and thofemountames which part it from Coma^na (a Pro- 
vince of Syria) are cal ed ^Amanus , the mountaines called Taurus running Eaft and 
r Weft as imaus doth North and South. Through Taurus the Riuer of Eufhratesfot- 
40 ceth hei -paflage leaning the name of Amanus to the mountaines onhcr Weft bankc; 
and on her Eaft fide the mountaines are fometimes knowne by the name of Taurus, 
(as in Ptolomtes three tables of Afa) and fometimes K iphates /(as in the fourth) re- 
tainmg that vncertaine appellation fo long as they bound Armenia from Mefopota- 
TOndafterthe Riuer of Twentieth them afunder, they then takethiname 
ot hiplmes altogether, vntill they feparate Affyna and **&, but then they call 
tnemldues Coatras though betweene the vpper and nether Medh,they. doe not an, 
pcare, but altogether difcontinue. For at iMacada in Medkthey are not found but 
ratine through the Eafterne Media by peeces ; in the middle of which Region t'hev 
call themfelues Orontes, and towards the Eaft part Coronus; out ofthe Southerns 
50 prt whereof the R.uerofe^^^ 

Caramanu : and then continuing their courfe Eaftward by the name of Coronus thev 
gme to the Parthuns and Hyrcamans their proper Countries.ThJs done.they charge 
thcmfelucs into the mountaines of&^, out pfwhich nfth the Riuer Mdrms f 
terwardyeeldmgherfelfetoav,*.. (now A,aj nnd drawing nowSeth™ie, 

M 3 end 



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nd.tab.Ajut. 



end they firft make themfelucs the South border of Baclm^nA are then honoured 
with the title of Paropamfus ; and laftly of Caucafi, eucn where the famous Rmeroi 
Indus with his principal companions HydaJ)u and Zarsdrtts fpring forth,and take be- 
ginning. And here doe thcfc mountaincs build themfelues exceeding high , toe- 
quail the ffronghilscalled Imaits of Scythia, which encounter each other in 35. 36. 
and ^.degrees of latitude,and in 140. of longitude: of the which thcWeftparts 
are now called Delanguer, and the reft ^agracot; and thefe mountains in this 
place onely are properly called Caucafi (faith Ptolomic^ J that is, betweene 
Paroponifus and mum ■ and improperly, bctwecne the two Seas of Cajpwm 
and Pontus. 



<3-l 



Xw.i}M- 



J.j.W. 



f. XI III. 

of the bejlyine naturally growing on the South fide of the mount nines Caucafi 

and toward the East Indies : and of other excellencies 

of the foik-J. 

NO w in this part of the world it is, where the mountaine and Riuer lant&s, and 
themountaineiVj^ (fo called of Bacchus Nifeus or T^oa) are found : and on 
thefe higheftmountaines of that part of the world did Goropms Becanus conceiue 29 
that the Ar.ke of ?(pah grounded after the floud : of all his conieftures the moft pro- 
bable, and by beftieafonapproued. lnhis indofiythicahee hath many goodargu- 
ments, though mixt with otheriantafticall opinions ofthis fubieclAnd as the fime - 
Becan'usalfo noteth ■ that as in this part of the World are found the beft Vines : fo ic 
is as true, that in the fame line, and in 3 4. 3 j. and 3d. degrees of Septentrionall la- 
titude are the moft delicate Wines of the world, namely, mludta, Candsa, ando 
ther parts of Gw«.andlikewife in this Region o£Mtrgiamt,aad vnder thefe moun- 
taincs, strabo dformetb. that the moft excellent Vines of the world are found; the 
clutters of grapes containing two cubits of length : and it is the more probable , be- _ 
caufc this placeagreeth in climate with that part of Palejlina, where the fearchers of 30 
the land by Mofes direction found bunches of equall bignefle at Efcel. 

The frui tfulneffe of this place (to wit) on the South bottome of thefe hils, Cur< 
/Htfwitnefleth. For'mCMdrgUna ncare the mountaine ot'Meros did Ajexanderfeafk ■ 
himfelfe and his Armie ten dayes together, finding therein the moft delicate wine 
of all other. 



t- XV. 

The conclufun ,with a brief e repeating of diuers chief e points. 



43 



ANd therefore to conclude this opinion of Ararat, it is true, that thole moun- 
taines doe alfb trauerfe Armenia s yea.and Armenian felfe fbmetime is knownc 
by the name of Ararat. But as Time giueth to this ledge of high hilles, euen from 
Cilicia to Paroponifut and Caucafus, the name of Taunts : and as the hils of France and 
Germame are called the Alpes : and all betweene France and Spaine the Pyrenes : and 
in America the continuation of hils for 3 000. miles together, the Andes : fo was Ara- 
rat the generall name which cMofes gaue them ; the diuerfitie of appellations no o- 
therwife growing, then by their diuiding and bordering diuers Regions and diuers 
Countries. For in the 1 ike cafe doe we call the Sea, which entreth by Gibraltar, the 5 o 
Mediterran and inland Sea-, and yet where it waftieth the coafts of Carthage, and ouer 
againft it , it is called Tyrrhenum : betweene Italic and Greece , Ionium : from Venice to 
Duraz>zo Adriattcum : betweene Athens and Afia *A.geum : betweene Sesius and 
Abydus HeUeJJHint : and after ward Pontic , Propontis, and Bofphorm. And as in 

thefe, 






m 



oy 















43 



,*j« 



C h a p^.^.io.f.iy. of the Hifiorie of the World. 



127 



. thefe , fo is the Ocean to the North-eaft part of Scotland called Beucaledonycum ■ 
• and on this fide , the Bnttjm Sea : to the Eaft , the Germane and Baltick , and then 
the Frozen. 

For a finall end ofthis queftion wemuft appeale to that Judge wh.ch cannot crre 
euentothewordof truth, which m this place is to be taken and followed according 
tothcplaincfenfe : feeing it can admit neither diftindfion , nor other ccnftruction 
then the wordes beare literally, becaufe they are vied to the very fame piaine pur 
pofe of a defcription , and the making ofa true and preciie difference of places Sure 
ly where the fenfe is piaine, (and being fo vnderftood.it bringeth with it no fubfe 
i o quent mconuenience or contranetie ) we ought to be wane , how we fancie to our V 
felues any new or ftrangc expolition 5 and ( withall ) to refolue our fcluci, that eue- 
ne word_( as aforefaid ) hathhisw.aightin Gods Booke. And therefore weemuft 
• rfpecfandreuerencethetcftimoniesof theScri£turesthroughout, infuch fort a* 
, S«. ^faguftme hath taught vs touching the Gofpell of 0^7/? lefrs ( which is ) ftw* *W* 

diteraccifat,quodnarrantibmdi(cipdvsChrip)inE mn gemegent,auamf l ip(amma 

man Dei, quam infrofrio cor fore gestabat, conftexent. That no man otherwifetakeor v» ? ' 9 

derjland that which hee readethwtheGo$ell,(the Difciplesofchri/t haw? writtenit) 

then if he hadfeenc the verte handof the Lord, which hee bareinhis ownebodie,fittmgit 

*9 Thewordesthenof ^which end this difpute aretheie. ^Jnd as they went «.*„*« 
fromtheEafttheyfoundaPlameinthelandofshmaar, andthere they abode which pro 
ueth without controuerfie, that Nimord and all with him came|oni the Eaftinto 
shinaar-, and therefore the <_Arke of Noah reftctl and tooke land to the Eaftwird 
thereof For weemuft remember, thatin all places wherefoeuer c^fornakethi 
difference of Countries , hee a wayes precisely nameth toward what quarters 

oftheworldthcfamewerefeated:aswhcreheteacheththe P lantationof/^he 
nameth^ amount in ithe Eaft .-where hee remembreth Cams departurefrom 
theprefenceof God headdeth And MweltintheUndofmdtowardestheEaJl- ^,0,* 
/de of Eden: Andwhcnheddcnbcth the Tentsand Habitations of lytfwW- e ^ e - 
3oterhedepartedfromW^,hevfedthefewordes. ^fierwarJesremco,,^ thence Gen* 

H t'ten Z'bf^ f C r rdein thenimh *»*<* chtlfiine chaptentis 
■ written. And Abraham went forth ioumyingtoward.es the South ■ alfowhen&A/ ^.jJ&i 
propheaedofG^andc^^ , heefteweththatthefemtionsefr^SwS 
tSto^T S: and 0f l h£ ^™ of *+* * wntten , that fieecamefom the ^ , 

fc t P0 '" t:?^ and % UarterS 0f the World ,itis moftmanifeft: 
for a/« was due Eaft from lud*a , Saba South from ife*/Sfa» « the way from 

habited theReg.onsd.reaiyNorthn^mP^^^randfcofthereft.Buii^^ 
anfwereth not to this defcription of shinaar by O^.For to come out o^rmen^ 

SSSS W Ie r? ¥ ^ isnoWio ^'ng^mtheEaft,norfone5 

vnotheEaftastheNorth:for^ w ^ ls totheWeftoftheNorth.tfdfe ; andwe 
m U ftnotfayof^( w hoiehandestheholyGhoftdirecfod)thatheee;redi 
^,andthathe,knew not Eaft from Weft. Forthebodyof^rW.ftandcthir, 
fortie three degrees ieptentrionall, and the North part thereof in fortie fine- and 
thole GWm^mouhtaines, whereon itwasfuppofedthatthe^r/vrefted ftindir, 
mfortieone But Babylonia, and the valley oCshinaar are fitunted inthir efife 
;o and for the Longitude (xvhich maketh the differencebetweene Eaft and WefS 
W^mountaincs ftand in 7J degrees, and the valley of SWin 70 and 80 
And therefore i»«m hcth from J/^Northwcft,ninerie niiedc^ree f om the 

whole quarterof the compaffe. But Cregorieaadffieromemrm vs, In fcnptuTne 

minima, 




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10 



minima differentia omttti debet : nkmfinguh fermones , fylkbs. , apices, etpunclain umini 
ftripturaplena funt fenfibm, In the finptures the leajl difference may not bee omitted: for 
eueryfpeechjyllxble, note, or accent, and point in diuine /captures arc replemfied with their 
meanings'. And therefore feeing CMofes teacheth vs that the children of Koahcamc 
from the Eaft, we may not beleeue Writers (of little authoritie) who alfo fpeake by 
hearefayand by report, ^//^/wr,^W/«rtr, as Berofus and i^icoUits Damafcenm, 
determining herein without any examination of the Text, at all aduenture. But 
this is infallibly true, that shmaar lyeth Weft from the place where the j&keoi 
Woah Kftcd after the floud; and therefore it firft found ground in the Eaft, from 
whence came the firft knowledge of all thinges. The Eaft parts were firft ciuill, 
which had A r ^himfelfe for an inftrufter : and dircftly Eaft from Shimurm the 
feme degree of 3 5 . are the greateft grapes and the beft Wine. The great Armie? al- 
fo, which ouertopped in number thofe Million s of Semiramis^rout that thofe parts 
were rirft planted : And whereas the other opinion hath neither Scripture nor rea- 
fon fufficient : for my fclfel build on his wordes who in plainc termes hath told vs, 
that the Sonnes of Afc^came out of the Eaft into shin.iar , and there they abode. 
And therefore did the Arkereb on thofe Eafterne mountaines , called by one gene- 
rail name Taurus , and by Mafes the mountaines of 'Ararat , and not on thofe moun- 
taines of the North-weft, as Berofus firft ftined, whom moil part ofthe Writers haue 
followed therein. It was, I fay,, in the plentiful! warme Eaft where 2Y>^reftd, 20 
where he planted the Vine, where hee tilled the ground and liued thereon. Placuit 
vera No ach o agricultur a ftudium , in qua traclandaipfe omnium peritiftmus ejfe di- 
titur : ob eam% rem fua ipfius lingua. I s h- A d a m a t h ( hoceH ) telkris vir appellator 
i-V?- celebratu/4, est, The fludieofHusbandriepleafed\$o ah (faith the excellent learned 
man Arias Montanvs)' wT the knowledge and order of which it is faid , that 
Noah excelled all men: and therefore was he called in his owne language a manexercifei 
in the earth. Which alfo fheweth that hee was no wanderer : and that hee troubled 
not himfelfewith the contentions , beginning againe in the world, and among 
men, but flayed in his deftined places, and in that part of the world, where 

hee was firft deliuered out ofthe pri fon o f the Arke^^ 30 

whereinto God had committed him to 
preferue him and man- 
kinds 



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10 



Cha v.$.§.i. of the Htftorie of the World. 



Chap. VIII, 

Oftbefirjl planting of Rations after thefloud- andofth 
Scnnes of Ho ah, Sem, Ham, andlJ 
v ret, by -whom the earth ivas 
repeopled. 





$. I. 

Whether ShemWHam were elder then I a p h e t. 

F thefe Sonncs of Noah, which was the eldeft,thcre is 



m 



a queftion made. SK Augustine eftcemed shem for ^ e «? dec \ > 
the eldcfr, few for the fecond, and A/fefor the yon- C «-'.W. 5 . 
gefb and herein the opinions of Writers arediucrs 
But this we findeeucry where in the Scriptures and" 
e/peciallyin^fo/w, that there was neueranyrefpect W" 
giuentotheeldeftinyeares, butinvertue, as by the 
examples of Henoch, Abraham, Jacob, and Dauid is 
mademanifeft. In a few wordes,this is the ground of 
the controuerfie ? The Latine tranilation, and fo the 
Geneua, hath conuerted this ScriptureofGf/z^Vi-J^N 

iw*v"„, l i l / ' we children borne. But lumm asrccins. with the s?» L ,V~ > > /a • 2./- 

hadfollS r? ° fth r v0rd ^^-> madethl ^ifFcrence. For iftheword f^' 

itbenZS" 

bem n ? r ef ii?^ as !t ls ty *efe tranflations for shem. Now (the matter 

boTuZt n £a Cm) - £ " eing G °, ds bIeffings arc not ^ d t0 &ft SX 

* conuenic„« £ ^^^S'P^^rP'^y^^rftood without any danger or m- 
SSSSfif 5 ftnlnge W ^ ^ man of i«dgement fhould make Valuation 

StLi th ^ ( ? wit) thchundrethyearcfollowing, camethegc- 

SoT ofS/ f r f yCar , CSaft u r Wbch ^ b ^^#W,. which w;.sintheyefre ef8lIfo , 

3r/T° ) 'r areSafertI,efloud:an(1 ^ b£ ? athis Ml'™ebein g joo. 
old at rt fl i th ^fore, watshem the elder, he had then becneahundredveares 
ter Wh, ur' , thc fixe hundret h ycarcof A^Kfe/and not twoyeares a£ 
a l fo J it ' C n h Je 5 ng ™ c Scn Pture before remembred hath dcnyedhim,andthatitis 

,W„„, / J ^° AH avoke from his wine, andknewvhathis younrer fonnehtd r™. 

aone -vnto him ftn n-it iu«., c rr \ r \ , , , , , J ° j"""- crja » Gen.u.v.w 
vounvrr r r - J ■ ," ; of neceffitIe ^e firft place doth belong to laphet. This * 

J "gerfin wfoconuertcd by the vulgar and G,*L, mU turnes fcjfflf LiZ 

jo hisjoungeftfonne but S*. Chryfo ft ometd 



I 



>-*■ 



•#- 



■ i? tf? 



-s* 



53 



_akes it othcrwifc,and iindes Cham to be the 
Wthcyoungeft fbnneof all : which- cWforhjs 



Sfc f , rothcr ' and *¥* 

dUmhented,andloftthepreheminencieofhisbirth, zsEfinand Reuben M Fere- , r 
wwconcaueth that /tow was called the younger in refpeft of Afew thecldcft , but 
~=*v*^*~* a $•)$• Q).ti4-lZZ-<}6-l-y*3 t?7 ■*? auoweth 
X%1 i6).%H 



f^ft.f- 



r 



130 



The fir f 'Boofy of the firft part C h a p . 8 .§.z. 




6jk.fi .f.to. 



<5§- 



auowethwithall, that the Hebrew hath not that prccife difference oi younger and 
yeungefi , becaufc it wanteih the comparatiuc degree. It is true that Shem himfclfe 
was alwaics named in the firft place.yct whereas in the firft Verfe of the tenth chap- 
ter ofGenefis, shem is accounted before laphet : in the fecond Vcrfc Mofes leaucth to 
beginhe with the ifluc by shem, and rccitcth the children oi laphet firft. So the firft 
place was'giuen to Shem for his cle&ion and benediction , and for this waightie rc- 
fpeir, that the Hebrew Nation, ^fbraham,thc Prophets, Dauid , and chrift our Sa- . 
uiour were defcended of him. And therefore, whether wee fhall folio w"tKe Vulgar 
Pagrimus, and the Genetht , who agree in this conucrfion , S h e ufiater I a r h e t 
maior; oT\viththcSeptuagint,/uniM,nndTremelws,Smnfiatri I a vhet maior is; 10 
orwith Pererius, She m filter I a p h e t ilk magnus : inferring that Shem was the 
great and famous brother of laphet, let the Reader iudge.But for ought that I hauc 
fecne to thecontrarie, it appcareth to me that laphet was the cldcft. For where Pc- 
rerius qualificththe ftrcngth of the former argument, That Shcmszgc at the time of 
the floud did not agree with his clderfhip (with a fuppofition that the Scriptures 
tookc no account of fmallcrnumbers) I doe not findeinthe Scriptures any fuch 
neglect at all : for it is written , that Shem was an hundred yeares old, and begat A r- 
phaxad two yeares after the floud, and againe in the 12. Verfe. St Shela liucd 
after he begat E s a r , foitre hundred and three yeares, &c. fb as the number of two 
yeares, of three yeares, of fiue yeares, and afterward of twoycarcs wcrealwaies 10 
prccifely accounted. 



$. II. 

Of diuers things that in allrcafon arc to 'be pre fumed, touching the firft planting ofthes 

■K or Id , as that all Hiftories must yeeld to Moses ; that the world was not 

planted 'all 'at once, nor without great direction : and that the knowne 

great Lordes of the firft ageswere of the ijfiuu 

»f H a M. 



r»tf 



W 



»lKl 



>-*/Cv~r 



& 



CKeroAtiai. 
pemunJ.}. 




JO 



Vt let vs goe vnto the worldsplanta'tion after the floud, which being 
rightly vnderftood, we fhall finde that many Nations haue fiippofcd 
or famed thcmfelucs thofc Anccftors and Fathers , which neuer law 
orapproched theboundsoftheircountries,and ofwhorn thcy.arcby 
1 no way or branch defcended . For it is plaine in the Scriptures howe 
the Sonnes and iffues of Noah were diftributed,and what Regions were firft planted 
by them, from whence by degrees thcreft of the world was'alfb peopled. And if a- 
nyprophane Authour may rcceiuc allowance herein,, the lame mull bee with this 
caution, TJiat they^take^he^ir beginningwherethejjeripturesend. Forfbfarreas^^ 
the ftoric-ofNatiansis therein handled, wee muft know that both the truth and an- 10 
tiquitie of the bookes-of God finde no companions equal! , either mage or authori- 
se. All rccord,memorie,and tcftimonic of antiquitic whatlbcucr,which hath come 
to the knowledge of men, thefamc hath bcene borrowed thence, and therefore la- 
ter then it, as all carefull obferuers of time haue noted : among which thus writeth 
£«/^/'».rin.theProoemcof his Chronologic. Moses is found more ancient then all 
thafewhomthe Grecians make most ancient, as Homes., Hesiod, andtheTroianwarre '; 
and fitrrc before Hercvles, Mvsaevs, Linvs, Chiron, Qrphevs, Castor, Pollvx, 
t^scvLApivs, Bacchvs, Mercvrivs, W Apollo, and the reft of the Gods of the 'N*- 
tions, their ceremonies, or holy rites, or Prophets :jcndbefore allthedeedes of Tvi>nr_ER, '. 
whom the Greekes hauefcatedin the. toppe andhigheft Turret of their DiuinitieLJ. 5» 

For of the three Iupiters remembred by Cicero., the ancienteft was the fbnnc of 
ts£ther, whofe three fbnnes begotten on Proferpina, were borne at Athens, of which 
Car ops was the firft King : and in the end of Cecrops time did Ukofes bring the chil- 
dren o£ Ifrael out oi'^£gypt, Eduxit Moses papulum Dei ex %/Egyptonutiftmt tem- 

fgrt 



,J^ I 



r^ 



*5 



C h a p.S.^-z. gff/fe iJz/frwV o/>/^ World. 



W 



pore Cecropis Athenknfis Regis , Moses brought the children of jfrael out of ^£- 
g?pt,in the bit dayesof Cecrops King of the Athenians faith S t .Auguftine: and yet <DtCm\ix>& 
was not CVo-0/.f the Founder of the Cittie it felfe, but 7/fc/«« long after him. But '•' 8 -'-iJ< 
becaufe the truth hereofis diuerlly proued, and by many learned Authours, I will 
not cut a (under the purpofe in hand by alleadging many authorities in a needleiTe 
queftion, but leaue it to the proper place. 



XGomer. < 

iOHngog. ("The Sonnes of Corner were,- 
Atadai, I t 

1 nc tonnes otfafMtwereXfXi 1 

[and '(.^he Sonnes oF/auanwcre, 
Tiros: 



"Askenaz,. 

Jitphath. 

.Togormd. 

Elifha. 
Tarjhis. 
Kittim, and 
Dodanim. 



Firft, we are to confider that the world after the floud was not planted b v ima ei- 
nation, neither had the children of Noah wings,to flie from Shmaar to the vttermoft 
border of Europe, Afica, and Afu in hafte, but that thefe children Were directed by a 

lowifeFatherwhoknewthofepartsoftheworldbcforethefloud^owhichhedifpo- 
ied Jus children after it, and fent them not as difcouerers, or at all-aduenture bu t *£ 
f igned and allotted to euery Sonne and their iffues, their proper parts. And not to 
hearken to fabulous Authours, who haue no other end then to flatter Princes (as 
Vrrgd did Augultu* in the fiction of ^Eneas) or elfe to glorifie theirwne Nations - 
Let vs build herein vpon the Scriptures themfelues,and after them vpon reafon and 
nature. Firft, therefore wee muff call to minde and confider , what manner of fice 

^eeartheuerywherehadinthei3o.yeareafterthegreatinundation i andbyco 1 n- 
panng thofefruitfulleft va leys withourowne barren and cold ground.informeour 

fclues thereby, whatwonderfulldefirts^hatinpaflTableMnelleofwoodseX 

3 °Sff' T" | raff % w u hatLa ^ ™ d ftandingPooles,andwhatmanfl; s ,Fens 

and bo g ges,alltnef,ceoftheearth(exceptingthemountaines)waspeftcred with- 

all. Forif inthisourclimate (where the dead and deftroying winter depreffeth all 

vegetatiueandgrowingnature,foronehalfeoftheyeareineffea)yetintwentieor 
thirtieyeares thefeourgrounds would all ouergrow and becouered (accords, to 

;tr u rh ereof) /^ 

Sll K T C u' d f forts °fp lants >reedes,andtrec S ,profperin themoftfruir- 
fullVall.es, andmtheclimate of a longandwarmeSommer, and hauing withal! 
tneitartof i3o.yeares,tora.fethemfelueswithoutcontrolement 

1 his being confidercd it will appeare , that all thefc people which came into Stfi 

4 ° 71 'f r an i° UCr ^ h r° me f! mr " d dther b ? orderor ftren B th t0 °ke the dominion, 
ti^V 'Tu fio "« fIan g ua g es ' an datfuchtimeastKeygrewtobeeamightie 

which contained the beft part ofUtofipotamia, Babylomam<\ chdd** ; and from the 
bordersthereofm time they were propagated : fome of them towards the South, 
others towardes the Weft and North. And although there wereallotted to shem 
many Regions, both Eaft and Wcftfrom Shtm.tr, with the Dominion oiPdeltim 
wJiichtheC«»/„ firftpofTeft- yet could hec not cnioy thelotof his inheritance 

Sr?"r yt, M, a ' lddf § Kes ' Forwe find ' thac Abraham the true fuc- 
celior or Shem dwelt in chdd** atrr; and from thence ( called by God ^ he rO-d 
50 at Charran in ^efofoUmu ; from whence after the death of hmt he tnuailed 
to Sutemm Pdeltm,, . and yet there had paffed betweene shem and AbrAarr \ rec 
komngneither of themfelues ) feuen defcents , before Abraham moued outof Chal 
d*x : where, and in Bdyloma, all thofe people by A'Wcommanded inhabited for 
many yeares, and whence iWWwent out into Ajfyria, an d founded Nmmie. In- 
deed 



- 



-& 






'H'l 



1 :, '." 
3 355 






r 



i^i 



GW.9.V.17. 



WmB.Cbrmel, 



Tbefirjl^Bookeoftbefirjlpart Chap.S.^. 

deed the great Mafters of Nations ( as farre as wee can knowe were , in that age of 
the ilTucs of Ham; the bleffing of God giuen by Noah to shem and lafhet taking lefle 
effect. , vntill diuers yceres were confumed ; .and vntill the time arriued , which by 
the wifedome of God was appointed.. For of cfc, Mizraim, and Canaan came 
thepeopleand Princes , which held thegreatKingdomesof Babylonia, Syria, and 
*Aigyft for many defcents together. 



10 




£ III. 

Of the lies of the -Gentiles in Iafhets portion :s/Beblosvs& toojpecdiefea- 

ting Gomeu thefonne s/Iajhet in Italy ; and an other of I a- 

p H e t s fonnes Tvbalw Spaine : and of the antiquitx 

ofLonginque Nauigation. 

l f%& Obeginne therefore (where .Af#/« beginneth) with the fonnes of Ia- 
W ^ eth " amon § whom the Hcs-ofthc Gentiles were diuided : which di- 
^ uifion, as well to lafhetsfonnes as to the reft which came into Shinaar, 
k was (ifthediuillon were made at Phalegs birth) in theycareofthe 
! world 1 757. or 1 7 5 8. and (by that account) in the yearc after the 
floud one hundred and one, ofwhich queftion elfewhere. a 3 

The habitations proper to the fonnes of lafhet were thellcs of the Gentiles, 
which include all Europe with all the Hands adioyning , and compaffingit about: 
£«^bcingalfotakenforanIland,bGthinrcfoect that the Sea Hellefpont anckrf- 
geum, Bofi.horus and Euxinm cut it off from the great continent of Afia, as.ilfo be- 
caufe Europe it felfe is ( in effect. ) fur-rounded with water, fauing that it is faftned to 
Afia by the North, for it hath thofe leas before named to the Eaft.the Mediterran to 
the South and Southwell, the Ocean to the Weft, and Brtttifi, Germane and Baltick 
Sea, with that of 'Glaciate 'to the North Northeaft, and Northweft. Befkks, it 
hath about it all the Cyclades or lies lying betweene Greece and the leffer Afia , and 
the Iflcsof Rhodes, Cyprus,Creet or Candia,Sicilia,Corfica,Sardinia, Malta,xht Ides of 30 
Brittante and Zealand, with theiryong ones adiaeerit. 

T his partition and portion of Iapheth , with the part which he held in >^ifia, and 
the North, which was alfo very great, anfwereth to that bleffing of God by Noah. 
BilateiHeui Iapheth, Zf/GW^W<j^.W(orincrea/ethepofteritieof) Iapheth, 
andlet him dwell in the tents ofS a e m, For though Junm here vieth the word {alliciat) 
and not dilttef.and the Geneuaferfuadeat ; yet the Septtiaginthaxxe dilatet or amplified; 
and fuch was the bleffing giucn to our Fathers , which God promifed to Abraham 
and his feed for cuer. And the dwelling in the Tentsor Tabernacles of shem was 
a bleffing by Godtothepoftcritieof/^/^: noting not onelyan enlargement of 
territories; but that thereby they fhould bee made participant of Gods Church. ± Q 
But to come to laphets fonnes, of whome Gomer is theeldeft. This Gomcr (if wee 
may bdeeue Berofifs and Annius, whole authoritie the greatcft number of all our 
late writers hauc followed) did in the tenth yeareof Nimrods raigne depart from 
Babylonia,and planted Italic: which alfo .F»#c7»«confirmeth in thefo words. Anno de- 
cimo N i m r. o b 1 , &c„ In the tenth year c-of~N\ mro ds raigne , Comervs Gallvs 
planted a Colonic in that land afterward called Italic: and in the twelfth yeareof 'the fame^j 
N 1 miods raigne T v-b \i.featcd himfelfe in Astttria in Sfaine ( now called Bifcay ) 
whichivasinthei^o.andinthe,i^t.yearcsafterthefiond,accordingto B ehosvs. But 
this opinion is very ridiculous. For before the confufion of tongues the children of 
Noah did not feparatethemfelues, atleaft fo many of them as came with Nimrodm- 59 
xoShwaar. Let vs therefore confider with reafon, what time the building fuch a 
Cittieand Tower-required , where there was no prepared matter, nor any readie 
menncstoperformefucha workeas ?£;Whad erected (andasft^^^himlelfe 
out of his Authour Sfz-tf/^r-witnclTeth,) adaltitudinemejr magnitudinemmoMium , to 

the 




.and 



*ta. 









T'- 



Chap. 8.^3. oftheHi/torieoftbe World. 



W 



the heighth and magnitude of the momtmn.es. Sure that both this Cittieand Tower 
■ were almoft buildcd the Scriptures witneffe. But the Lordcamedownetofeethe Cittie Gm 1 1 
andTower, which the Somes of men bmlded. Let vs then but allot a timefufficient for ' ' '" 
the making of bricke to fuch a worke, of the greatcft hcighth (and therefore of cir- 
cuit and foundation anfwerable) that euer was. For where the vniuerlall fioud co- 
ueredthchigheft mountaines fifiecne cubits; Let vs build -vs a cittie \nd 'a Tower 
(faith ^mrod) whofe top may reach vnto theheauen : meaning , that they would raife 
their worke aboue tiftcene cubits higher then the higheit mountaine, otherwife 
they could not allure themfelues from the feare ofafecond inundation : a great part 
1 o whereof was fimfhed before it fell , and before they left the worke. They alfobe- 
ganne this building vpon a ground, the moft oppreffed with waters ofall the world- 
as by the great nunc which thefc waters forceably ouerbearing and ouerflowing' 
made in the time of the fucceeding Emperours, is made manifeft, approued alfo by 
the Prophet Hieremie , fpeaking of Babylon in thefe wordes. Thou that dwe/M vpon 
manywaters. It cannot be doubted but that there needed a fubftantiall foundation 
forfohigh a raifed building on a; marifh ground : and to which GfycZVpon Genefis 
giucthForticycarcs. For itfecmcth.thattheTowerwasnearenniOiedwhenGod L ° c* 

oucrthrcw it : it being afterward written, So the Lordfcattcrcdthemfiomthencvpon 
alltheearth, andthey left to bmldthe Cittie. Out of which place it may bee gathered 
20 (becaufcthcTowcrisnotthen named) that they very ncare had performed the 
worke of their fuppofed defence , which was the Tower : and that afterward they 
went on with the Cittie adioyning, wherein they inhabited. It is alfo to bee noted 
that till fuch time as this confufion feized them (whereupon the tower wa* throwne 
downc) thefe nations did not difperfe themfelues : ibrfom thence the Lord fcattered Ge* t,< 
themvfon all the earth, (thatwas) when they perceiued not one an others fpeech ' 
Now to thinke that this worke in the newnefle of the world ( wanting all inftru' 
ments and materials) could be performed in ten yeares 3 and that Tubal md Corner 
* in the fame ycare could crecpe through 3 ooq. miles of Defart , with women chil- N| 
dren, and cattle : let thole light belceuers , that neither tyc themfelues to the Srio- 
• 30 turc,nortoreafon 3 approueit,forldoenot.. And if the ^irke of A^wasToo 
yeares in building, or but ncare fuch a time /(and then) when the world had flood 
- 1 ; 5 6. yeares,it were more then foolifhncs and madnes it felfe, to thinke that fuch a 
worke as tnis could be performed in ten } when the world (from the fioud to the 
airmail at -Baud, and beginning of this building there) had but 1? 1 yeares and 
whereof they had fpent fome part in trauailing from the Eaft. Againe, if all J/faCct 
to their helping hands in the building of the Temple of Diana, and yet they con- m 
fumed in that worke 400. yeares (or beit but halfe that time) and in fuch an age as ' 
whentheworldflounincdin all forts of Artificers, and with abundant plentie of 
materials and carriages ; This worke of the Tower of Babel could hardly ( with all 
4o the former wants fuppofed ) bee erected in thofc fewyeares remembred. And for 
concluhon, let all men of mdgement waigh with themfelues howimpoffibleit was 
tor aNation or familie of men, with their wiues and children, and cattle, to trauaile 
' 30 , 00 -™ 1 " r thr 1 ou B h ^ oods > b °ggcs,anddefarts, withoutanyguideorcondudtor • 
v andwelliallfindeitratheraworkcof ico. yeares then of xoo.dayes. Forin the 
: Weit^^fwhich the Spaniards haue the experience , in thofc places where they 
tounclneithcrpath nor guide, fhey haue notentred the Countries miles in tea 
yearesTffnd iDVimrods people fpent many yeares by the account before remembred 
m palling from the Eaft-Jndiaox the higher part thereof, which ftandeth in 1 1 r de 
grees of longitude, vntill they came into Shmaar which lyeth in 79. degrees (the di 
50 fiance betweene thofc places containing 3 6. degrees, which make fio. leagues 
which is 2 1 60. miles) and did all the way keepe the mountaines and hard pround ■ 
then the difference betweene Babylon and Bifcay is much more : for the bodie of*/? 
cay lyeth in ten degrees, and Babylon or Shmaar, (asaforefaid) in 79. f the length of 
, wayfrom shwa.mo Asiurhw Bifcay is 6 9 . degrees, which make 1 380. leagues or 
JfQ^y' Vf-tyf*. "of 

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of miles 4 1 40. And therefore if 'I^imrodtooke diucrs yeares to find Shinaar,yvhich 
was but a 1 60. miles : or ( fuppoling that the Arke rcfted in Armenia) little a- 
bouc 400 miles : there is no caufe to the contrary , but to allow as many yeares to 
Gomer and Tuballto trauaile 3000 miles to countries lelTc lenowne vnto them by 
farre;thenthelandof Shinaar was to N'tmrod. For Paradyfe was knowne to Noah 
before the floud : and fo was the Region of Eden by CMofes afterward rcmembred; 
but what hee vnderftcod of moft part of the world elfe it is vnknowne. And there- 
fore did Annim ill aduife himfelfe to plant Gomer in It die > and Tubalm Spaine, in the 

i[ti.t,i(.v$. tenth and twelfth of Nimrodsxax^ne: shall theearthbebrought forth in one day,or (hall 

a nation be borne at once ? But it may be obie&ed , That the Sonncs oflapheth might x a 
come by Sea, and fo faue this great trauaile through Deiarts by land. But we neucr 
read of any nauigation in thofe dayes, nor long after. Surely he that knoweth what 
it is to imbarque fo great a people as we may iuftly fuppofe thole conduclers carried 
with them,will not eafily beleeue, that there wercany veflels in thofe daies to trans- 
port Armies, and (withall) their cattle.bywhofemilke they liued and fed their chil- 
dren : for milke and fruit were the banquctting diflies_o£ our forefathers. And in the 
eldefttimes,euen the Kings and Fathers ofnations valued themfeluesbytheheards 
and numbers of their Cattle ; who had flocks of (heepe, and great droues and hcards 
of their owne, and their owne fhecp-heards and heard/men. Now if Tubal had pall 
by Sea from any part of PaLtfina, Syria, or Cihciu, hee might haue made good choice 
within the Strcights, and not haue ouergone Granado, vdentia, and other Prouinces 
in that Tract :paft the Streights of Gibralter, difdained all Anddufaand Portugal/, 
with all thofe goodly Ports and countries; and haue fought out theyron,wooddie, 
and barren Countrie of the world (called Bifeay) by a long and dangerous nauigatj- 
on. Bile before the iourney of the Argonauts there were fcarce any veflels that durft 
croiTethe Seas in that part of the world : andyet that which lafon had (ifthetalebe 
true) was but a Galley, and a poore one (God knowes) and perchance luch as they 
vfe this day in Ireland: which although itcarryed but foure and fiftie pafTengers,yet 

nnnd. sicui. u. was it farre greater then any of the former times : Erat enim antea paruarum namcula- 

1 fA, (lf!if ^^^»^/ OT ^^^#^jM^# I denie not but that thcTy- 
rians gauc themfelues of old to farre-off nauigations , whence Ttbutlus afcribed the 
imiention of (hips vnto them . 



■ill 



¥. 



20 



p 



TibuU.Ek^.y. 
Strabo.l.16. 



Prima rat em vent is credere docla Tyres. 

Tyrus knew firft how fhips might vfe the winde. 



P&./.7.C.55. 



ThucyA. 



And for thofe boates called long* naitesoi GnWxSyPBme fifch thatt^^aferibeth 
the deuifeto Paralus. ■ and Phile/tepbanus to lafon :Ctefias to Samyras; andSaphanus 4 o 
to Semiramis : ^Archimachm to <s£geon : to which inuention the Erythrd are laid to 
haue added certaine numbers of Oares : and then Aminocles the Corinthian to haue 
increafed them : the C4tf4^/»M».f afterwards to haue brought them to foure banks: 
the QuMfrRemi firft to haue beenevfed by Nefichthon the Salamnian , with whicli 
Veflels in thofe parts ofthe world, the Pomansietued themfelues in the Punick war. 
But thefe be perhaps but the partialities of Writers , or their ignorance. For there 
are that as conftantly caft the deuifmg ofthefe Gallieson SefoHris , though Semira- 
mis vfed them in the paflage of her Armie ouer Indus in Abrahams time. So it is faid, 
that Dapaui was the firft that brought a (hip into Greece : and yet the Samothracians 
HS - * 1 "* c ™ llen 8 c the inuention; and yet Tertullian (onthecontrarie) giuesitto^mw; 50 
rent* cmn. °™ crs t0 ^tune ; Thucydides to the Corinthians. And fo ignorant were the people 
of thofe ages, as the Egyptians vCed to coaft the mores ofthe red Sea vpon raffes dc- 
uifed by King Erythrm: and in the time ofthe Romans, the Brittanshad a kindcof • 
Boat (with wheh they croft the Seas) made of fmall twigs, and couered ouer with 

leather: 



PTm.l.7.c-tf. 



mil. 



icW7 '< 



.^.^i exf.sjS- 



13 



C h a p. 8.^4. o/>/^ %« of the World. 

leather : ofwhichkinde I haue feene at the Dmgle in I reland, and ellewhere Nau 

frimhmcanxfalix s madefaCiovimme,paruam 
Texttarmpuppim, M fe£ mdutaiuuenco, 
Veiioris pattens tumtdum fuperenatat amnem. 
Sk Venetws flagrante Pado, fafod Britannus 
JVauigat Oceana. 

The motftned O/yer of the hoarie Willow 
Is wouen firft into a little boat ; 
Thencloath'din bullocks hide, vpon the billow 
Of a proudeRiuer, lightly doth it float 
Vndcr the Waterman : 
So on the Lakes of onerfwelling Poe 
Sailcs the Venetian : and the Bnttan fo 
On th'out-fpred Ocean. 

tZZlrf 7T l t di7 fr W™* that there ™ S much *fterence S be- 
tweenethe^ of Noah, and fuch fhips as were for any long natation. Ycaan- 

aentilones ihew.thatitwaslong after thefet im es,ereanyirft P Umeionl 
Y 1 ^g. v r Pg«^Sea:atleaftw 1 thmultitudesofwomen,and children, £. 

iv^rT 01 ^ ? CMt ^ vs '^teuc a now.whe»thisA«iscoLe7o£ 

peifcclion, fuch voyages are very troublcfome and dangerous. So as it doth an 

3 ol 5 th " xer 5 lfc of «""B*ion would not haue beene dead for fo many hundred 
30 yeares after. Leaning therefore the fabulous to their fables, and all men elfe to 

• na^^^r^~-^ f -T Ith ^fe ; t0 ^h truth there is ioy- 



k< 



40 



mi. 

l W Mesech, Jeated firft 
about Ajk the lejje , out of Ezech i e l. 
C*/. 38.35;. 



o/Gog WMagoc, Tvba 




: Ow although many learned and rcuerend men haue formed (I know 
not whereby led) a plantation of the world, which alfo hath becne 
and is reeeiued:yet I hope I may be cxcufcd,if I differ altogether from 
them in many particulars. Certainely, that great learned man of this 
j. latter age, Arias Montanus was alfo in fome thmges much miftaken • 
and tor lojephus, a, b e hath many good things, and is a guide to many errours witli- 
au, jo was he in this plantation of the world very groffe and fetulous, whereby both 
t-ujebtm ■,BteroJolyrmt<mM,Epithmms, and others, that haue taken his teftimon.es for 
50 currant.hauebeencbyhim&rremiflcd. But the bcttertoconceiuc what Redo™ 
of the world Gomerth, firft fonne of Upha poffeft, as alfo Tubal, it is nccdfall to be 
gmnc with Magog .- becaufc the Scriptures take moft knowledge of Go* and Marm? 
which two names haus troubled many Commcntators,fa,th Matth. tereddus who 
nath laboured herein with great diligence, and whom (of all thatcuer I read) I'fin'de 

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moft iudicious in the examination of this plantation. He takes authoritic from the 
Prophet Ezechiel chiefly, who in the 3 8. and 39. Chapter direclcth vs, what Nati- 
ons the Gomerians, Tubalines, and Togormians were, together with the Magogians : of 
all which Gog was Prince or chiefe Conducter in their attempts againft J/raeL For 
befides the portions ok' Europe , and the North-eaft parts of the greater A fid , which 
Iapheths iflues poflcft, all A fa the Lcfle was peopled by them. And that thofe of" the 
iffueof Iapheth ( whom&fcttfpeakes of) were featcd hereabout, it may beftap- 
peare if wee confider the circumftances ofthe place , and the dependence vpon the 
former prophecie in the 37. Chapter. For in that 3 7. Chapter,&fcfo>/ prophecieth 
ofthe vniting of the two Kingdomes of Tfrael and Iuda , after their deliueric from 1 o 
captiuitie. 

By which prophecie of Ezechiel, it appeareth, that God purpofed to gather toge- 
ther his people, to giue life to dead bones , and to rule them by one Prince. For to 
that purpofe it is written ; Ani David my ferutmt fall bee King oner them , and 
they fjallhaue one fjeepe-hetrd, (that is ) they (hall bee vnited as they were in Damds 
time. Hereupon in the 3 8. Chapter Ezeehiel prophecieth againft thofe Nations, 
which fhould feeke to impeach this Vnion, and difturbe'rhe people of ifrael, whom 
God purpofed to receiue to grace , and promifed to rcftore. And Co in the fame 
Chapter are thofe Nations coupled together, which infeftcd the ifraelites after their 
returne, and fought to flibieft them : all which were the fubieefs or Allies of Cog, 10 
Prince ofthe Magogians, or Calefrmns , next bordering PaUflina or the holy Land, 
followed alio by the reft ofthe Nations oi'i_y£fia the kite, which lay North from Iu- 
dxa. ThewordcsofEzechielavetheCc-.Sonneofman/etthyfaceagainft Gog, anda- 
gainsithelandof])Akr,oc ) thechiefePiincesofM.i.st.ca (or M osoch) andT v- 
b a l: and afterward. Behold, 1 come againft the chiefe Prince of Me sh ec h andTv- 
b AL:andinthefixthyerfe$ Gomes, and allhis hands, andthc houfeofT ogoim* 
ofthe T^orth quarters. Herein &«Whauing firftdeliucred the purpofeofhis pro- 
phecie, teachethwhat Nations they were, that fliouldin vaineaflaileT/rW. Heioy- 
ncth them together vnder their Prince Gog, and fheweth that their habitations were 
on the North quarters oDuda, and how featcd and ioyncd together. Go? fi gni fieth 3 o 
intheHebrew ( faith S c . Hierome ) tectum or couering of a houfe_j : and Pmtitsvpon 
Ezeckel affirmeth, that by Gogis meant AntichriH • for (faith hee) JLntichriftus erit 
Diaboli tegumentum fub ftecie Immana, That Antichrist fall be the couering oftheJDemil 
vnder humane forme_j. Hee addcth that CAUgog is as much to fay as Goo- .• the letter 
(M) being an Hebrew Prcpofition,and importeth as much as of or from: Co hctaketh 
Magog for thofe people which follow Antichrist. So fiirre Pintus ; at lcaft in this not 
amine, that he expoundeth CMigog not for any one perfon, but for a Nation , with 
which agrecth this obferuation oiBeroaldus. Magog (faith he) in Hebrewis written 
Ham-Magog, which fheweth Magog to bee a Region or Nation : for the letter ( He) 
whichisvfedbutforan£w/>fe/?j (which the Hebrewcs call Heliaiedia) isneuerad- 40 
ded to proper names of men, but often to place. So as Gog was Prince of that Nati- 
on (called either Magog, or according to others the people of Gog) alio Prince of 
Mcfliecb, (or Mofoch ) andofr«W:asbythefirft Vcrle ofthe 39. Chapter is made 
manifeft. Behold, I come againft thee Goo the chiefe Prince i»/Mf.shech and T v- 
£ a l. This muft needes be meant by the fucceflburs ofseleucus T^icanor , whodid 
not (asothcrconqueringNations) feeke to make the laves their Tributaries onely, 
but endeuourcd by all mean.es, and by all kinde of violence to extinguifh the religion 
it felfe (which the Hebrewcs profeft) and the acknowledging oFone true God : and 
to force them to worftiip and f crue the mortall a nd rotten Gods ofthe Heathemof 
>- which nothing remained but the very name, and dead Images^ _ S\ Amhrcfe and ^""5 
oWe take Gflpor the Nation of the •Goths: belike becaufetheyinuaded Europe, and 
flicked Pome, and many other places and Citties thereabout. Hermolaus Barbaras out 
of Pomp. Mela deriues the Turkes from the Scythians, eftecmed Magogians o?Gog. Ma- 
ny take Gog for the proper name of a Man : others of a Region • others foraNation 

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inhabiting a Region, as/^whofiics that ff^isthenamcof a Nttwwfenomfc 
natcd from him whom the Greeke ftories call %*.• who in former rimehai 
lame cWW« the Lydim, gaue his ovvne name to that Nation thence after «T 
led ^ .-and thereof alfo the % ,« Lake, which Lake str* al/6 hndeth 
in Zpfe, (of which % «was King) fortie furlongs from Sard.s. Htn^ c lie , 

it Gygeumjlagnum. Herodotus and AW«r let it about the Riuers of SS Sl 

aodcaW,,; but the difference is not groat. «•*.**» makXittloS 

£feft«, which runneth into the HeHeftontc, called the Promontory Trapefe after his ««**-« 
loownenamcG^., Thefeopinionsdoealfofeemetoftrengthenthatof L2» Fo 
^p^hl^thatpartof^^ 

his fonnc Ott/b) 3 who as /*»» further notes ) hauinernaiftrcd all r! nf P " . 1 
^rreSouthas/.Wmthatbo^^^ 

m me ^ w « figniiieth the C.ttieof Gog) feared i^^SSSS^^ * 
ancient enemies of the lewes. r s 

Now that o-ir^is found in Ceteris, Pltnic affirmed, faying . c2Z'iaUet 
Bambycen^usdio nomne Hterafol* vocatur, Syrjt vera CUagog. ckeJa China 
B^^h^^eJUMtof^i butofthetynmsJL Refer 
,o £f n ^ vsth 1 at ; hem ° nft t rousIdoI1 ^^ i calledbytbeW w %L" C ; U i r - 3 
whereworfl,,pped,Z« T makesment,onhereof,/ a7 mgtl(attheC,ttiehadancint 
lyanothcrname, which yctheexpreffethnSt 5 forbeanngperhapstfewordS" 
gag, asfounding nothmg elegantly in the Greeke. Butif Jiim - beleen TT 
then was^mc^^the'fame taW^SitS^ 
was worshipped. O^to is doubtfull whether one of thefe Amh n L 
m,Me the place of this Ba^yceor H^pol,, iTly^T^ZlStZ 
Tame name and Religion was common to them both Certaine itfs rh^? 1 r 
rhemlaydueNorth from Pdefir,*, and were b^LhSZlZv ^f 

lowing /^^bntgrantthat perhaps o%W mights taSKS,?" 

30 jgrtjr 3 notwithftandingthatin thisplace wLgSIh t? f e 

,1!/! ',w J -> w ' the Acceflbursof**»^ the fucceffourof 

££» JT2 '^^"^^^^^thatthis^^^s^hat^SSen r, j 
SS™^t ;^ ta ^r-'^^h 3t lb e eneca!leSS ) HES? : 
we naue laid , but. al/o £^ , not that by Elates ■ buVahmher' of the &m£ 

ZlJrzTs ad tilctItle ' «->crcdasthe &red O&fc, ( forfethe^S 

50 chapt?wE;!: rrethe r F ^^^^*^^^^SS 

r j ■ ■ u V wwast fteCirCieofc ^%whichalfoisfeatedrfiradHv«o C fhft^«i 
M with whomcdfe^^cooplcth G**^ and^l -fab WSeslShe NaS 
quarters; wemay (aslconcerue) fifely conclude' that &S&SSS2SS 
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ansof France, nor the Tubdines of Sfaine,but a people of the lelTer <_^/&, and Cwlefy- 
ria-. and therefore that the opinions oiBerofus, lofefhus, and whoibeuer die hath 
followed them therein are to be reieftcd. But if lofefhus referre himidfe to later «2 
times, and thinke that fbme Colonic of the Tubdines might from iberia&nd Afia pafle 
into Spaine (to wit from that peece of land betwceneColchis ( or Mengrelta) and yrf/- 
fe»w.- ( moft part poffeft by the Georgians) then is his iudgement of better allow- 
ance. For without any repugnancie of opinions, it may granted, that in proceffe of 
time thefe people might from their firft habitation paffe into (he Countries neare 
*he Euxine Sea, and from thence in after Ages into s faint. 

Iofephus makes mention of the /kr/,iaying,that th ey were anciently called Thobt - i o 
Us, as of Tuball;t\om. whence ( fayth luftine ) they faffed into Sfaineto fearch out the 
mines of that Region : hauing belike vnderftood that it was a Sontherlie Countrie 
and mountainous. Forit feemeth that the Tubalines called chalybes liued altogether 
?by the exchange of iron, and other mcttals , as <^Apolhnius witnciTeth in thefe fol- 
lowing verfes,telling how the ^r^c»«</«didyifitJhem. 

HttcgensteUuremrigidononziertitaratro, 
Sedferri venasfcinditfub montibus alt is: 
Mercibus h&c mutat, qua viu aliment a mmiflranti 

The Calybes plough nottheir barren folic, 
Bilt vndcrmine high hilles for iron Veines: 
Changing the purchafe of their endleile toils 
For merchandize, which their poore hues fuftaines. 

>But it is more probable, that Sfaine was firft peopled by the Africans,who had euer 
fince an affection to returne thither, and to repeqple it anew. Thisap'pearcd by the 
Carthaginians o? old , who were cafily drawne to pafle ouer the Streights into that 
Countries and after by the Moons whoheldOwWiymd the South parts eight hun- 
dred yeares, till the time off erdinandand ifibel. And either of thefe opinions are 30 
moreprobable, then that in the twelfth ycare of Nimrodsva\%v\?,Tubal paftinto 
Sfaine, andtherein built S*. Vual : a poore Towne, and apoore deuice,God knowes. 
Ccrtainc it is that we muft finde Mofochov Mefech, and Tubal neighbours, andGomer 
and Togorma not farrcoff,orelfc we fhall wrong E&tchitl .-for he called Gog the Lea- 
der or Prince of Mefech and Tubd^and makethGomeratidTogormathdra.Biftants. 
And that Mefech inhabited ^Afia, Funciius (though hefollowcd BerofisJ confefTeth, 
for thefe be his wordes. M e s a c v s, ^«* * Most Mesech, prtfios Mejios ab A- 
dula monte vfy ad Penticam regionempofuit : hue rtgiofoHek Caffadocia diet a eft*, in qua 
vrbs Mazica, eye. hac eft terra Magog principalis. Mesacvs, whom Moses tallcth 
M e s e c h, pkcedthe ancient Mejlans from tht mount Adults-, -unto thecoaltofPontus. 4© 
This Regionwas afterward called Caffadocia, in which is the Towne Maz,ica, eye. this is 
the frincif all, Countrie d/Macoo. And this doth Annius alio auow, and yet forgets 
thai; fivgwas Princebothof Mefech and Tubal .-and therefore, that the one was a Na- 
tion of Spaniards, the other ofCappadocians, is very ridiculous ; Spaine lying direftly 
Weft, and not North from ludxa. Alio Ezechielin the a 7. Chapter, where he pro- 
pheciethofthe dcftru&ionof Tyre , nameth Mefech and T«^ioyntlie. And for a 
fjnall proofe,that thefe Nations were of a Northerne neighbour land (how farre fb- 
euerftretcried) &«fe/inthe 38. Chapter makesthem all horfemen. Thou, and 
much. peopkmth thee, all Jball ride vponhorfes, euen a great multitude and a mightk-J. 
Tfeen ifany man beleeue that thefe troupes came out of Sfaineoutr the Pyrenes , and 5 o 
firft pafledouera pativf France, Jtalie, Hungarie,and Sarmatio^and imbarqued againe 
aboutthc^d/^w/', or die compafTed all Pontus Euxinus, to come into tne leffcr A- 
fu, which is halfe the length or compaffe of the then knowne world, he may be cal- 
leda:§rongbelecucr,but he fhall neuer'beiuftificd thereby. But on thecontrarieit 

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Chap . 8.^.?. of the Hifiorie of the World. 



43 



isknowne, that Seleucis was a Prouince neighbouring Paleslinaox ludxa, and that 
Hterapolts ( or UJ%^ ) wyncd vnto it : whofe Princes commanded all Syria and 
^> the lefle, (namely the SeUucid*) and held it, till Scipw ^futitus oucrthrew An- 
twehus the great: after wh.ch they yet pofleft Syria, nil the time of 7/mwff -and 
whether -Mejhech be in Cappadoaa,ox vnder i^«, yet is it of the Tubalmes , and one 
and the lame Dominion. 

Of Gomer the like maybe/aid. Firfthee feated himfclfewithTftww* not fane 
from c^-W and Tubal, in the borders of Syria and C&s*. Afterward hce procee- 
ded further into Afia the leffc; and in long trail of time his valiant iffue filled all 
io G^^.refted longin France and Bnttawe, and poiMed thevtmoft borders ofthe 
earth, accomplilhing (asiMelantfov well notes) the fignification of their parents 
mme^vhichisrtmojlborderwg. But when thefe borderers wanted furthei place 
whenntothey might exonerate their fuelling multitudes, that were bounded in by 
the great O^, then did they returnevpon the Nations occupying the Countries, 
through which they had formerly pafled, oppreflmg foft their neighbours after- 
wardes the people more remote. Hereupon it was (as the worthy reflorcr of bur 
antiquities CM. Wtlliam Cambden hath noted) that they were called Cimbri which 
in their old languagedoth fignifie robbers ; neceffltie inforcing them to fpoile their 
neighbours, to whom in their onginall they were as neare ioyned, as afterwardes in 
io the feates which they polTeiled. Forthatthe warlikeNations of C^^ we rem 
elder ages accuftomed to be beaten by the Galks, theauthoritie of CWSr affirmine 
it is proofe fufficient . But in times following they purfued richer conquefts 
andmorceaiiethoughfurtherdiftant, by which (toomit their other enterprifes 
nothere to befpoken of) they weredrawne at length into A_fiath C lefTe, and occu- 
pied thofe partes, which had formerly beene heldbytheir progenitours Ifavnoc 
that they -claimed ^hnds^^bydcE^^^y^S^X^ 

of oldfeatedin^ becaufein late ages they returned thither, vnlelTehee will 
, o IttlU fc? ° e Nat j° ns , which from &*! P^tes haue inuaded and conquered 
thenceithefirr' maybythaC ar S ument bce P™>ucd not tohaue iflueJfrom 
Now concerning Samothes for his excellent wifedome firnamed Bis, whome 
^innms makes the brother of ffi^and Tubal (which brother CMofes neucr 
Sl.nn P r ke ^owledgeof lafhets Tonnes) they muft, finde him 
nforneoIdPoet : for *^ a great *«-*>» confeffeth. Qunic Samothes fuertt 
mcertumetf Who this Samotheswas itis<vncertatne- y neither is their any proofe that 
ne was that fame to, whome c*ftr fayth the Gaules fuppofe to be their Anceftour • , 
yea and ngmer confeffeth with Funttms. Ma^onnefcaytauitlesloit. nomanknoms C '^ Cmm ^ 
who be was. J * "'£>»•£»« i. 

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Againjithe fabulous Be.iosvs his fittion. That the Italian 
1*mvsh»<»Noah, 

Vt before I goeon with Noah hisfonnes, I thinke it ncceflarieto 

\ difproue the fiction which Annius hath of Noah himfelfe : an in- 

. uention (indeed) very ridiculous, though warranted < as he hath 

wrefted) by thofe Authours of whom himfelfe hath commented - 

J° * " ^^ as the fragmenxof Berofus , Fabms Picior, Cato , Zauimusand other/ . , 

£, r nffT ekCSt K Pe ^ deVS ' th *^ (firnamed/^) was the fame which ZlZt 
rounded Genoa, with otherGtties in //^wherein he liued 92. yeares This to dif- "'"• 
prooue, by CMofes filence, is a fufficient argument to me , if there were nothina elfe t^S^ 
todifprooueit. Forifhevouchfafed^ 

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Citable and Niniuie by Nimrod , Noah was a man of too great marke to be forgotten, 
with all the aftes he did in pa. yeares. Butit wcreaneedlefTe labour formctodif- 
prooue the authorise of that .8my«.f, on whom Annius groundeth , feeing fbma- 
nie learned men hauc Co demonftratiuely prooued that fragment tobe counterfeit. 
Befides that , Tatianus the Ajjyrim in his oration againft the Greekcs auoweth,that 
the ancient and true Berofus wrote onely 3-Bookes, dedicated to Antiochus thefuc- 

■leftfbJ.t. ccffourof Seleucus Nicanor -.but AnnmshathdcuiCed j. Bookes, wherewith heebo- 
noureth Berofus. And whereas Berofus handled onely the eftateof the chaldaans 
and Affjrians, Annius hath filled this fragment with the bufinefTe of all the world. 
And if wc may beleeue Eufebius better then Annius, then all the Kinges of the La- i © 
tines (before *Aineas) confumed but ^o.yeares : whereas no man hath doubted, 
but that from Noahto v£neasamua\l into ltdie there paft 1 116. (after theleaft 
rate of the Hebrewe account) and (after Codoman) iigi. For Ianus (who was the 
firftoftheirKinges) liuedatonce with Ruth, who married B00&, in the worldes 
yeare (as fome reckon) 2717. after the fioud 10(54. and No <^ died 350. yeares 
after the floud.: and fothere paft betweene 7*»/w-of it die and i\»«& firnamed lams 
704. yeares. For Saturms f ucceeded Ianus , Rhus after Saturnus, Faunus after Picus, 
and Lattnus followed Faunus : which Latinus liuedatonce with Tautanes the 1 7. 
King of Ajjyria t with Pelafgus of Peloponnefus : with Demophoon oi Athens ; and 
Ssmpjim Judge of ifiael. Now all thefe fiue Kinges of the Latincs hauing confu- 20 
med but one hundred and fifty yeares 5 and the laft of them in the time ofSampJon: 
then reckoning vpwardsfor one htmdred and fifiyyeare,and it reacheth Ruth, with 
whomc&zwliucd. , 

. Trucit is, that the Greekes had their. Ianus; but this was not Noah: Co had they 
Ion the fonne of Xuthus, the fonne of ifeucaltm , from whom they drawe the lones, 

■nrtcb.17.19.ii who were indeed the children of lauan, the fourth fbnne of lapheth For the vul- 

&fothep!ace „„„ T.~,..fl „..:„.. / l.„.i..iij i- . . . „ ' 



l ^U 



v _ 1 1 , , ' «vw« w.* jviuiv, ut iywcw, r\Jl Lilt vui- 

oiEfTetZ S ar iranflation (.whcfe.theHcbrewword-isJi«») writes Greece, and the Septua- 
(for uum)hcL &»t Hellas-, which is the fame. . So had they Medus the fonne of Medea, whom they 

Srallf" ""J? the parent of theMedes .-though they were defcended ofa fiirre more ancient 

*i»i»}Hrifow. father (towit) Afcfcthe. third fonne of lapheth. , 

Laftly we fee by a trueexperience,that the £r/tf$ language hath remained among \ 
vs abouc 2000. yeares, and the £«g^ipeech cuer fince theinuafion of the Angles : 
snd the fame continuance hauc all Nations obferued among themfelues, though 
withfbme corruption and alteration; .Therefore, it is ftrange if either Noah (by 
them called lanm)bad left in/At//? his grandchild Gamer after him,or Tubal'm Spaine, 
that noptynereiemblance of the Hebrew, Syrian, or Scythian (which no time . 
could haue quite extinguimed) mould haue beene found in the languages of thole 
. , Countries. For which reafons we doubt not but thefe perfonalf plantations of Ia- 
nus, Gomer, Tubal, &c. in ltdie, Spaine, or France, aremeerely fabulous. Let the Ita- 
lians therefore content themfelues with the fame Grecian Janus , which commaun- 40 
ded them and planted them , and who preceded the fall of Troy but 1 50. yeares, 
(faith Eufebius) which was in the time of 'Latinus the fift King : which alfb S c . ^Au- 
gustine and lujtineconnrme: and thisagreeth with reafon, time, andpoffibilitie. 
And if this bee not fufficien t to difprope this vanitie , I may out of themfelues adde 
thus much : That whereas fome of them make Veita (others Camafena) the wife of 
■this ianus, , whoinftitueed-thcholie Fire of the FefidFirgins in Rome{the Latincsznd 
Romans taking from Ianus all their idolatrous and heathenifh ceremonies ) there is 
no man lb impious, as toideeue that Noah himfelfe, (who is laid by Mofes to h.vte_j 
walkedmtkGod, to beaiiuft man, and whom God of aifmankinde made choice of) 
could heather ignorant of the true and only God,' ©He wicked and vngratetull, to 5© 
let vp or deuife any Heathen faluage,' or idolatrous adoration, orhaue inftituted aW 

. ccremonie,contrariet0Thafvvhichhc ( knewbeftpleafm2toGodhimfc!fe • 
•.:- ° . 

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\. VI. 

7A?/ Go.mei^ W to Sonne T o g oj. m a eftbeposteritie o/'Iapheih jj?ar« 

_/fr// j&*/*rdf ^/tf (_///& A /^ : W that from thence they (bread 

li'esiwardtnto Europe: and Northward into 

Sarmatia. 

O Jurnc now to the Sonnes of Noah, and the worlds plantation after 
thefloud: therein I obferue, that as both realon and neceffitie taught 
them ; To, when they multiplied in great numbers, and difperfed 
themfelues into the next countries bordering to their firft habitations, J-l 
and from thence lent forth Colonies elfewhcre, it was in fuch a manner 
as that they might rcpaire to each other , and kecpe intelligence by Riucr : becaule 
the land was yet Defart and oucrpreft with woods, r'ccHcs, bogges , and rotten ma- \fi -'3 
riihes. As when Nimrod fcated in Babylonia , Chits toolce tlie South ^arfof chaldna 
downe the Riuer of Gehon, by which he might pane too and fro from Babylon to his 
owne plantation :thofealfo, which were of the race of Shem, inhabiting Mn or 
Orehoatieare the Lakes of Chald.ea, might by the fame Riuerget vp to Babylon , and 
receiue fuccour from thence. All which Trail of land vpon Gehon Southward 
CMofes in the delcription of Paradife calleth the land of Chttjh: becaufe the Domini- 
on and Empire was then in the hands of iNnnr/>da Cufiite.by whom thechildrcn of 
Shem (which came into that Valley and flayed not in the Eait) were for a while op- 
preft, till God afterward by the feede of ^Abraham made them his owne nation and 
victorious. Hautlah, the brother of Mmrod, and Tonne of Cuflj, tooke both bankes of 
■Tigris, efpecially on the Eaft: fide of the Riucr : by which riuer his people might aU 
lb pafTc too and fro to -&?&>/. & 

T he Imperial! fcate of which Region of Hauilah or Sufim , wa s anciently called 

chufian, or Chufrn , afterward Sufa. Cufi himfelfe tooke the bankes of Gehon ,' and 

planted thole Countries Wcftward, and South- weftward towards Arabia the fto, 

3 o nic, and the Defart, where /Yofew^placeth the Cittie ofchuftdia, firft chufia. r ,y ir M U b 

Seba, and Sheba with the reft that planted Arabiafdix, had Tigris to conuey them " 

into the Perfian Gulfed, which waffieth the bankes of 'Arabia fcelix on the Eaft fide : 



10 



In like manner did lap heths Tonnes fettle themfelues together, and tooke their feates 
in^/MthelefTe: from whence they might indifferently ftretch themfelues North- 
ward, and Weftward, into the next parts of Europe^ , called the Ijles of the Gentiles. 
And jtfeenjeth very agreeable to reafon, that both Gamer, Magog, andTubal, fate 

4o downe firft ofall in that part of Syria, to the North of PaLJIwamd Phankia .- and 
from thence Gamer or his children paft on into Afia the lelfe, as thole of Olttgog and 
Tubal did ; from whence the Tubalines fpred themfelues into Iberia : and the CAiago- 
gims more Northerly into Sarmatia. The firft Gomerians , and firft planters in Afu 
the lefTe, held the Countric of the Cymmertans (witneffe Herodotus) the lame Re- 
gion which was afterward by the Gallo-greckes called Galatia, to whom S c . Paul-wrote 
his Epiffle 16 intituled. This Nation of the Cymmertans (whom theinuincible^/- 
thuns afterwards difperfed, and forced from their firft plantations ) gaue names to 
diners places; as to the mountaincs abouc Albania ( called Cymmermt ) and to the 
CmicotCymmeris in Phrygia : alfo Bofplmus Cymmerius tooke appellation from this 

5 o nation,in the outlet whereof was alio a Cittie ofthat name called Cymmertan /which 
PMeiikh (miftaking the place) hadfometime the name of Cerbemn ; but Cerbe- 
nonwasa Town? mCampania, fo called of the vnhealthfull waters , fauourinoof 
brimftonc: which Augustus caufed to bee clcanfcd by letting in the 'water of the 
J-nkc Tiicrimts. 

The 



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The children of Tubal ranged as farreas lberia,to whom the Mefcbieiwerc neigh- 
bours, which others write Mejhech. The Prophet Ezechiel (coupling them toge- 
ther) callethG^ the Prince of Mejchech and Tubal. Fo? thefe Afefchi (which Ptoit^ 
mie calleth MoJ'chi) inhabite Syracena a Prouinceof Armenia., directly South from 
the mountaines Mofchici, in the Valley betweene the mountaines Mofchici, and the 
mountaines Paryardes : out of whofe North part fpringeth theRiuer Phafis; from 
the Eaft part Praxis; and from the Weft £«//ra/«.-andofthis^/^/,>f^arcdef- 
cended alfb the cJ^/cwwi* (faith Aielar.chton,) and it may bee, thatinproceffeof 
time fome of them inhabited thofc Regions alfb : For Mejhech ( faith Melanchton) 
fignifieth extendens, enlarging or f retching forth. Togorma alfb at firfb did inhabite a- 1 o 
mongft his parents and kindred. ThcTogormians were alfb called Giblei, a people 
neighbouring the Sydonians in Gabala, a Tetrarchie oiPhatnicia, the fame which Plwie 
i.K.wj- i>-i 8 - czWethGaktt : from whence Salomon had bis moft excellent Mafbns, which hewed 
ftones for the Temple of 'Hiemfalem. Thence the7"<;>£W7w/<«Mftretched into the lcfTc 
Armenia , whofe Kings were hence called Tigranes , and their Citties Tigranokartz ; 
of which Citties Tigranes fubdued by Lucullus the Roman-, built one. Hiercjolymita- 
nus hath planted the Togormians in Barbaric : forgetting the Prophecic of Ez,echiel a- 
gainft the Tynans. They oft he houfc ofTogorma, brought to thy I 'aires horfes^ and horfe- 
men, and mules, which could not well be driuen ouer the whole length of the Medi- 
terran Sea, but from the neighbour Countries by land. But Iofephus takes them for 20 
the parents of the Phrygians ^ which I doe not denie , but they might bee in the en- 
fuing ages: and fb might theTubalines be ofthe Spaniards ; but it was from lberia,md 
many hundred yeares after the twelfth of "Nfmrodsxix^vxe. The /«mconceiuc that 
the Turkes came ofthokTogormians,becmk their Empcrour is called Tegar. The - 
chaldtms make them the Fathers ofthe Germanes. But Laonicus affirmes that the 
Turkes defcended ofthe CrimTartar , which borders Mufcoma. Butforthcfcfub- 
dcritiations it were infinite to examine them. Only ofthe firft and fecond plantati- 
on, and ofthe firft Nations after the floud is the matter which I labour to difcouer ; 
and therein to open the ignorance of fbme, and the corruption of other fabulous " 
Writers. And this wee muft Note, that thofc grand-children of'Noah which were 20 
of a more quiet fpirit, or (perchance) of IcfTe vnderftanding, and had not therefore 
theleadingofCtf/tfwHTfcntout, their proper habitations can bee hardly knowr.e: 
only reafbn hath taught vs , that they dwelt among the reft, and were couercd 
with the fame of others, who tooke on them the conduction and dominion ouer 
the reft. 

From Madai the third Sonne of Iapheth , were the Medes. The Grecians bring 
them (as before) from Medus the Sonne of yJvkdea. 



Note. 



f VII. 

of\ avan the fourth Sonne ^/Iap-heth: andofMts-c n, d/Ajam, 
and Meshech of Iapheth. 



40 




S3 F Iauan the fourth Sonne of Iapheth axmc the /ones, which were af- 
\| tcrwards called the Greekes: and fotheLatine and Greeke Interprc- 
i h ten for Iauan write Greece , as in Efai; Et mtttam ex ijs quifaluatifnermt 
'/& adgentes,inmare, in Italtam,&Graciam , AndlreiU fendthofc that e- 
^ fcapc of them locations in the Sea, in/talie and in Greece. The Geneua 
here vfeth the word (Tarjhich) for Tar/its-, a CittkinC&Mj though Tarfis'm many 
places bee taken for the Sea. The Tigurine and thcGeneua Vfc the mmes Tubal and 50 
Iauan, and not Italic and Greete : keeping the fame Hebrew Wordes. Of thefe Iones 
were the Athenians, though thcmfelucs dreame that they were Aborigines, or men 
without Anccftours, and growing (as it were) out ofthcfbileitfelfe: who aboun- 
ding in people Cent Colonies into Afa the IciTe, of whom came the Iones of thofc 

parts. 






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Chap.S.^. ^pfe ^or/V o/>^ World. 



»45 



parts. Others denuethe^W^frorn/^ thefonneofx^thcfonneofW M 
«*», buttheant.qu.neof/^rnarres the faihion of that fuppofition, who! 
sianjyeares preceded JUk, /«*, ot Demotion. Paufaniaiteh vsth-k &***<££ 
^^withallhis^^ 

at^w.he wasgrauoudyrecauedby^?^ whogauchimh sdnuier n 
™f«S^whomhe^ 

, ^^W»F 1 fS«»^ ereaedapmmntha S 

J/wfo out tfHtut** affirmeth, that the /,*„ came out of^&into (^ which 
iscontranctotheformer opinion : That the lones of Graret anfporSXta ne 

hough ^A knew no more thereofthen he learned of thl Greekes themf its ^ c 
I fandcthis coruccture of ^^rrafonablcenough.ForthoughitwerftohS 
knowne, yetfure I am rhato4& the lefle had people before TreM^Z 
aothat/^ddno^^^ 

iage s and from thence paft ouer the neareft way leaulrre hi n,™V, V in , ni 'P al - 

J »" himfelfe beleeued , that /«?»« rooke thenime fr™ /*„ ,1 J r r m V 

jfaw ■Trueitis.Aat the Gr^in aftff^^ 

tcr P rcte "dmcrflywr.tten. «/ w with the Fulear write* A*i* tbViWof 

SeSmeta S rP^ ^"^^""^^^^tkpaVofthofepeopIe.o? 

f™T Pro "'"ce wherein ZWhid himfelfe : or die (which miv rather 

exile (wh,le he iiued among a barbarous and irreligious people) v/eth thefewE 

— fionbetakenforthebeftyetallmakem 

of 



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Thefir/l 'Bookeofthefirjlpart Ch AP.8.^.7. 

of ' Arabia petrsa ; and the Chalddan puttcth 4?* in ftead of Mefech ; but the Hebrew 
it felfe hath Mefech. And if it bee to bee taken for a Nation, (as it is more likely, be- 
caufeitanfweresroA?i<w, the name of a Nation) feeing OHef the (onne of ^w, 
x .chron. 1 7. is called Mefhec, it is indifferent whether this Nation tooke name from 
UHeficch or Afty$, both bordering ludm, and like enough to be commanded by one 
Prince ; for [o Eaechiel makes Mefech and Tubal. But as for thofe that xakeCMefech 
out of the word Mofoch (giuen by the Septuxgint,) to be the Mufcouian : fure they 
prefume much vpon the affinitie of names, as afbrefaid. And fure I am that Dauid 
neuer trauailcd fb farre North ; ( for to him Miifcouia was vtterly vnknowne y but 
about the border of Kedar (it may be) he was often in all the time of his pcrfecuti- 1 
on: thefamebeingaCittieonthemountaincs of Sank or Galaad. And yet ^4tms 
Montanus makes Mofoch the Father ofthc Mufcouians: and herein alio Melanchton 
r unnes with the ti de of c ommon opinion, and fets Mefech in Mufceuia, though with 
fbme better aduifeofTudgement; as, firft feated in Cappadocia, and from thence tra- 
uailing Northward : expounding the places of the 1 20. ¥£&mc,(Heimihiquodexulo 
in LMefech) to figniiie , gent is eius feritatem infignem cjje ; that the fentie of that nation 
exceeded: which fierccnefTe or brutalitie of the LMuf coitions, Dauid neuer proued , or 
(perchance) neuer heard of.But the fame feritie orcrueltie which thofe Northerne 
Utfufcomanshad, may afwell beeafcribed to the Arabians and Kedarens. For this 

Gm.ij.wj. CountrietookenameofA^^rthefecond/bnneof^wW, of whom a people of e- 20 
quail fiercenefTc to any of the world were begotten,both in thofe times and long af- 
ter, euen to this day, (if the Arabians, ifmaelites, and Saracens, may be accounted one 
people : ) the lame being forefhe wed by the fpeech of the Angell to Hagar, Gen. 1 6. 
V.X7.. AndhcfloaUbe a wild man : his handfballbe againjl cuery man,and eucry mans hand 
tgain/ihim. Now Arabia the Defart (faith Plinie) confronteth the Arabians Cochlei 
on the Eaft, and the Cedrd Southward, both wh ich ioyne together vpon the Naba- 
thd. So itappeareth (as before) that CMefech,Tubal, Gomer, Togorma, and OWagog, 
neighboured Canaan and lfrael, and that Kedar alio did ioyne to Mefech: all which 
were Regions of Syria, or of Afia the lefTe, commanded by the fucceffours of Selcif- 
ca^enemiesofthereeftabli(fimcntofy/r<jif/and/»i«. But (as I haue already laid) 30 
it might well be, that long after the firft plantation the ifliie of Mefech (or Mofoch) 
might paffe into Cappadocia, and thencejnto Hyrcania, and giue names , both to Ma- 
&ega in the one, and to the mountaines Mofclnci'm the other, and from thence might 
fend people more Northerly into Mufcouta: and fb all opinions faued. But all fil- • 
■ 1 • 14) uage Nations o ffrgrowneand wicultiuated, doe ( for the m oft part ) ftew^alS? 
plantation, euen as ciuilitie, letters, and magnificent buildings, witnefTe anti- 
quitie. 

ummmcht. tiras, thefeuenth fonne of Upheth, which Montanus reckons among the fonnes 
of Gomer, was the Father of the Thracians, as all Authours (worthie the examinati- 
on) affirme. Iofephus was the firft that determined hereof : and becaufe the Scrip- . 
tures are altogether filent, what part of the world Tiras peopled, the coniectures arc 
indifferent, and giue no ground at all of difputc. It followeth now to ipeake of the 
Sonnes of Comer , which were three : 

Afcanex,, 
Riphath , 

and 
, Togorma. 



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Chap.8.^.8. oftbeHiJlorieoftte World. " '"*" -* ~~^~~ 

$. VIII. 

©/A S C A N £ Z 4«^ RlPIIATH, ?& ft W tf/^ Sm „ es 

«/Gojm, 

S a n e z was the Father of thofe which the ftwfe/ call term, (faith 
Iojephus) but he g! u es no reafon why. 

Eujebim makes ;#£»«, the Father of the Goths. The Imesia their 
3%gKg make him the rootc of the Gffww ifc/aw, but their expoii 
tions are commonly very idle. . iHmie finde'th Afimu in Phrygian 
the Rmers of // 7 /^ and Qw: iMdmktM being of the foe opinion that the MT 

tfte ^Jcme^frtpojuoarmd, die Afianezjmd that the wordiignifieth a Religions 
Kccpcrof hrent being an ancient fuperftition to pray at the fire of Sacrifices 3 **•*»«* 
. terwardsatthctombsofiyiartyrs. Notfarrefrom A^ was theLaSSS a 
knowne by that namein the Rommes time. And among the Kings which cam- to 

he was beautifulland ftrong: form the lame manner doth 4^7 grace ^5 t 
W,^ !>«>*&> face andbodyltkeone oftkeGed,. rir S u£[oZ m tm\xnhfi°i 

Afcanms Buttms fttemakcth morcplaincmthedefeptionof^. Forhf 
placeththeCttieo f &*&* vpon the Rmer Afiamus, which is ad.oymng to S 

hndebythedellTiptionor^^^^^ 
countedh U eandtwcntiem,le s ,invvh.chwaythisLakeIyeth,euenbetvvee K eS 

^om "tfSt^fr* ^T^^^r ^^* JA ^*^W 

30 makcs.tadtteof r^-, built oy #/^mhefonneGf^»^..fiym g , that there 

wasanothero that name m ^//i. Of AftmazUteat BhimJfuS^ 

vnoC/, ; whicha^ 

or) neare c«, and called the Wands before r™, Afimes P • 

JS? r h CthC r th f p!aCeS t0 °, k e na,nc of ^^thefonneofe^, orof 4 C 
bZphrfi ?"r ° f ^V ,tm, S h ^q^oned:fureitis, that ^ W which 
3 ^' ° V ' cou!dno " ;fchi s namefrom^jfonne, who 

Has , theneitncr exceeding young, orrathervnborne: and it feemeth that the coun- 
trie, whence thole fuccotirs came were not out of any part ofPintu or My fa but 

nt 1i ?' b >T c , h 8 u; ' c SynechMe, as/wwthinketh. Out of thofe tdhmft. 
me* therefore which dccciuc not, we may confidently determine. For of the Pro* 

tncle. Sel . vf Shmdardm thcLndi Mow the trumpet among the Nations a^tmslher, eaS c » * M 

tomans. .,««/ was ./r;^ W;2 the greater, as moil interpreters confent, fo called of 
the monntanfej of Ararat which ruime through it : aU; the X^xArmeni, ■ Ar 
mau being compounded oFAratxAndMmi. For Mmi was the ancient name- 

50 tamedall thatTraafromf^^tothcSca^oafeof^^^Md^/S^^ 
therefore Mefyotamia being in elder times but a Prouince o£Wthe Sam^A-f 
ferenceit in the ftone oilacob and Efau, and call it Aram-padam. Then if thefe two 
Nations were ofthe Armenians and ^Sms ioyned with them (who alto-ether vni 
Nmlerc^andl^cameto^^ 

O 1 

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much'to call Askenaz, Germanic or ^Almaine,fox we heare of no <Vjjw/ Ruttters at that 
{lege. Bui the Askenaz were of thofe Nations which were either fubiecl: orallied 
to the Medes : of which, if any of them came afterward into Phrygia, I know not : for 
•the difperfion of Nations was in aftertimcs without account. But for the opinion 
KifEufebm,^/ho makes them to be Goths ; or that oflofepfais,whocah them Rhegini; 
or of the Ieivcs,who will hauc them to be Almatnes; when they confirme it either by 
Scriptures or Reafon, I will tbinke as they doe. 

Of Riphath the fccond fonne of Gomer there is mention in the firft of chronicles. 
•ArWi/wand/'^ww thinke thathee wandered farrc off from the reft of his bro- 
thers, and therefore no memorie of his plantation. But I fee nothing to the comra- 
de, but that he might feate bimfelfe with the reft of his fam ilie : for there wanted no 
roome orfoile in thofe dayes for all the foams and grand-children ofMah. There- 
fbre I take it to bee well vnderftood , that the Rtpheiwereof Riphath , which the 
■Greekcs afterwards (according to Iofephus) called the PaphUgones : and Riphei ( faith 
<JMelitnehton) fignificth Giants. Thefe people were very famous in the North parts, 
and iriSarmatia : the moft or number and power among them, Sarmatarum gens ma- 
xima Heneti, The greatest number of the Sarmatims were the Heneti ; who fpake the an- 
cient Poke : which being firft called Riphei ( for the louc of fome of their Leaders or 
Kings) changed their names and became Heneti, ( a cuftome exceeding common in 
thofe times) and dwelt firft in Paphlagonia, as Homer witneffeth, and fo doth Apollo- 
niiism his Argonauticks Now, when thefe Riphei (afterward Heneti) fought new Re- 
gions, they came along the fhorcs of Euxinus , and filled the North part of Europe^, 
contayning Rtifia, Litttania, and Polenta. From thence they croftthwart the Land, 
and peopled Illyria, defirous (faith Lftklanchton) ofa warmer fbileof fruit and Wine. 
Thefe Heneti or Veneti, whom Melanchton taketh to be one people,filled all that land 
betweene the Baltick and Adriatick Sea ; and to this day the name of the Gulfe Vene- 
dicus is found in Rttjsia. This Nation, after they were poffeft of Lituania and Polonia, 
difturbed the plantation of the Boij and Hermondurij. Therefore, it feemeth to me, 
that of Riphath came the Riphei, afterward Heneti ; and fo thinketh Arias CMontanus, 
firft feated in Paphhgoniajoxxt in courfe of time Lordes of Sarmatin , and thofe other 
parts before remembred , chiefly betweene the Riuers of ViHula and Albis. The 
name (faith Melanchton) fignificth wandering or wanderers, or T^omades .-a people 
\ which lrued by white m eates and fru i ts , as (indeede ) allNations did in the firft 

I Ages^ _ - • ; ' 

Of thethird Sonne ofGomer, Togorma , Ihaue fpoken already; now therefore 
of /w<«wchildren, which were fourc: 

'El,ft, 
I Tharfis, 
I Cethim, 
. Dodanim, 



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£. IX. 

Of the four e Sonnes oflhvktf: and of the double fgnif cation ofTharfs, either for 
a /proper name or for the Sea. 

tFElifaorE/.ipha,camctheiA:0les:and ofthis ElifaaW theGreekcswere 
'•called Hellenes, faith CWontanus. CMelanchton makes Elift the Father 
loftheyEoles \x\Afia fide : others of Elisin Peloponnefus , or of both. 
And feeing the Greekcs were defeended in generall of lauan , it is pro- 
1 bable that the tAZoles and the Elei, tooke name of Elift, his eldeft 
Sonne. &ttte/inthca 7 .fpcaking of Tyre, nameth the Jfcs of Elifa. Hyacynthus 

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thofcdayes,norfince, that I can rcade of : bBtthofi/yfeofS „ 7 , i , " 

^:fc^.thar,ariwngthec^^^^^ 

-T/^/w, the iecond Sonne of Z*«» inhabited C/ir M «r,„K;^-r/, r ■■ 1 

*° therefpectduetofo learn daman) hc^„ 
Cbdd MK raraphraUvulsCartbaJorT^ 

ofreajbnthc4. skkewiie, wherein ™ £« ESSS^™* 
uery threeyeares to T/W/&, and brought thence Co ic U °\ SaLmion wcn * *■ 

pared in the Red Sea at£>* frfc. in theBatSS , illlpS WCrc prc - 

Jttfo &Jȣ, Father in law) inhabl ed , rw i "T Vnt0 ^^ > wl ^ rc 

tfgr, or any other part o{ Africa, which might fell* ! w t fia ? r , ^ 

soAndiffogrcatnchesmigluhau bee^^ 

Pw/mhouphtno Sciin rhe ,,™U i,i,, Ms"^^. ^uta^theNationsabout 
therewereanyo"herSe but EoLlv I moth P cu,cwnc . ^doubted whether 

3°ther.ScathenthatoWci*fc 

/& had the greateft (hips mJ were Z 8 " ln, " g ; a " d that thc P C0 P lc °* ?*^ 

^s,theyiretheS^ 

.theSeAVwt ^ 

uigate, (namcTy T that the KingSp re |l o he S" f ^^^ 

named, cither for r///,^ %£ •?*$• ,md th ^tore Tharfi was not therein 

placed ™,y^^ 

thefecond fonnS 1« ™ 7 ^ £ Cfc Qtt,C ,n Cfc ' foundcd b ? **»/& 

wastopaiTeoJS 

planted the Z on that Zc 7 '1° ;" ^ > ^ ° f thc fame COaft ■ and fir * 
toi?k nn7i r ^ ,hore: gauethe///W;betweene ^& theleflearid-Ckafe. 
2g5, and left TharJ, vpon the Sea-fide in &W; of whom that §£^5 

StS 

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"Venturas effe cucr fores Tynex terra Cittim, This calamitifLj (faith Me lakchtos) 
M'< w f ore f jewed by E s a i /A.' Prophet, who in the three and twentieth Chapter pronounced, 
that the defrayers of Tyre were to come out ofCtttim. And although the children ot ij- 
raeljftcemcd all men Inlan ders, which came vnto them by Sgjuand^fegarate from 
that Continent ; (and fo alfb Cittim might be taken for iul>e,ihith Bcroddut ) yet wc 
muft take the firft performance of the former prophecie, which tooke cffccl with the 
deftru&ion of the Tynans by Alexander : who after feu en Moneths fiege entred that 
proude Cittie , and cut in peeces 7000. principall Cittizer.s ; ftrangled aooo. and 
changed the freedome of 1 3000. others into bondage and flauerie. Now,that Ma- 
cedon was taken for Cethimjt appeareth plainely in the firftofthe LMaccabees,m thefe 
wordes. After that Alexander.//^ Unlace donian , the Sonne ^'Philip, went 
forth of the land of Cethim, and flue Dari vs Kingof the Perfans and Modes. Iosephvs 
fets Cethim in the Ifle of Cyprus, in which (faith he) there remaineth the Citric Ci- 
tium, the CountricofZ^wthe Philofbpher (witneffe Laertms) which Cittie Pintus 
vpon Ezechiel affirmeth, that it flood in S c . Hieromes time. So it may be thatal!_thc_ 
Iflandes in ancient times by the Hebrewes were called the Iflandes of Cethim : and 
in that fenfe might Cyprm bee fo called alfb; and yet becaufe Tharfis was the very 
next Port to Cyprus, and directly ouer againft it, it is alfb very probable, that Cethim 



10 



dweltby his brother Tharfis : and finding that Ifland too (freight for his pcopleaf- 
tcr they were increafed , and that the reft of thecoafts, both on Afia fide and Greece, ao 
were inhabited by his Father and Brothers, hefent Colonies ouer the cAEgaw fea,and 
inhabited ^Macedonia. 

Dodanim the fourth fbnnc oflauan, and the youngeft brother (by the moil opi- 
nions) fate downe at Rhodes, as neare Cethim, Tharfis, and Elijahs he could. For Do- 
danim and Rhodanim are vfed indifferently by many tranflators : the Hebrew (D) 
and the Hebrew (R) are fo like, as the one may cafily bee taken for the other , as all 
Hebricians affirme. There is alfb found in Epirm the Cittie of Dodona, in the Pro- 
uince oiMolofia. And asCethim, when he wanted foile mCypriu : fo Dodanim (fea- 
ted in a farre leffe Ifland) did of neceffitie (end his people farther off; and keeping a- 
longft the coaft, and finding Peloponnefm in the pofTcffion of Eli/a , he palled a little 3 o 
farther on the Weftward, and planted in Epirm. And though the Cittie of Dodona. 
was not then built, or (perchance) not fo ancient as Dodanim himfilfe,yet his poftc- 
ritie mightgiueit that nameinmemorie of their firft parent, as it hapned all the 
world ouer. For names were giuen toCitties T Mountaines ) Riuers,and Prouinces, 
after the names of Noahs children, and grand-children ; not in all places by them- 
ielues, but by their fucceflburs many yeares after : eucry of their families being defi- 
rous to retaine among them by thofe memories, out of what branch themfelues 
were taken , and gra fted elf ewherc. And becaufe great Kingdomes were often by 
new Concjuerers newly named, and the greateft Citties often fired and demolifhed r 
therefore thofe that hoped better to perpetuate their memories , gaue their owne 43 
names, or the names oftheir Ancefters, to Mountaines and R iuers, as to things (af- 
ter thciriudgements) freeft from any alteration. 

Thus then did Iauan fettle himfelfe and his children , in the edge and frontier of 
^Afta thelefTc, towards the Sea-fhore : and afterward in Greece, and the Iflands, and 
neighbour Prouinces thereof, as lapheth their Father had done in the body of the 
lcffer Afia, together with Iauans brethren , Comer, Magog, Madu, Tubal, Mejech , and 
the reftround about him. And inlike fort did chufh (the fbnneofcferoj peopled 
bylonia,chald&a, and the borders thereof towards the Weft and Southwcft : and the 
fbnnes oSchufb (all but Nlmrod, who held Babyloniait felfe) trauailed Southward in 
■/^fez/w/z^andSouthwcftward into ^w^/v/™*.- the reft of his children holding jo 
the Regions adioyning to Nimrod. Mi&raim the brother of chufh in like manner 
tboke the way oftAZgypt.-and his brother Canaan the Region ofPaUJlina adioyning. 
TheSonncs of Canaan had their portions in Canaan, of whom all thofe Nations 
-came, which were afterward the enemies both to the Hebrewes, and to thofe of the 

fonnes 



1* 1 






« 



^ 



r... ""Cfph,f ' 

mi. 






CHAP.8.ff.ro.f.r. of the Hifiorie of the World. 



fonnes oishem, which fpred rhemfelues towards the U 

Off^W Sea: ofVhich IfballfpcafceheSer R fi \ an ,- d , the borde «ofthc 

or jft», which were foure • P hcrcatten But && of the fonnes of chm 



149 



I ^A*/, and 1 
Canaan. 



% Kit. 



- # 



Th «t tie fat of Qnvsu the cldefl r „„e of \\l mw • > >. 

' w milking oftbts point. r 



10 




0/ I o sEjHVi his tale of an ^.thopefe mf e fs u A 

Hat Ate was the Father of rJ™ .*•„„. ... 
nyScriptures,asinth; £>1 Mta^S"?^*^* 1 "* 

£/;W Jacob ^^LJSS^, ^""f^- 

Pfilme. ^/lueaUthefirfUorneZ'^ff , V / adm the 78. 

30 oto^ ^tagreethwkhordertofifirSS 
thedefcnp n0 nofP^ #handl P^ h ™ 

couldnotbe^/fe^ /yet feeing it C0 Shn« ^ F) P roued that 4/3 
gfei I willadde fomef/rtherproofc^^^ 

? rs i" a "y^%«ftr a ight, wbic had ^ f £/r r - F ° rthcmall!fcflatI °n ^reof 
fenfelefleinterpretations. Sure v hoi- ^ ver y crooked conftruftions, and 

b ? th , th D at ^-calied^L,and a ^"^f ^ T but ^^-- (towit) 
' wh,ch Re gl0 ns cA^and thccS/,, / r S , * the Ha PP lc a "d the Befart • 

40 well cleareththiscontroue rfi a tS? f And thcre ,s nothin S #&* <° 
W ^ r ^>h,swife is called TclXT^^^P^^-"-^-!. 

W ^himfelfe herein • and the nif 11 ^ f( f ^%«, we muft giuc credit 
or vainely led byhis 2 e ?„So ^"PW^^^wasg^mifiakS 



the Cittie it felfc n„A tn fj? ay both ,?f P arc "t s ■ Countrie, and friends ijfo 

O 3 mU!hS(lf " 4xtiq.l.i.c.f, 

fidert 



t^ 




,VOn'f* 



i£ 



150 



The firfl ( Boo{eoftbe fir f fart Chap.8.$.io.|.i. 



I 



2 %-— s 
„ SSs; 5 

SSS s 
o 



L.j. 



> K.if. 



f+l 



dit Erat^.thiopumregifilia,nomme Thai.i^. which tale hath this fenfe m 
Eneliih When Moses *« gneuedthat his ^Jrmielayidle,becaujetheenemie hedged, 
durst not faUieandcometo handle firokes , there hapncd this accident in the mrtne while 
The Ethiopian Kinghad a daughter called Tharms, who at/omeafaultsgmen beheld 
the perfon/f 'Mo ses, andwithalt admired his valour. And knowing that Moses km 
not only vp-held andreftoredthc falling eftate of the Egyptians buthadaljo brought thy 
conmerin? Ethiopians to the very brincke of fuhnerfion : thefe thmges working w her 
thoughts together with her owne affection, which daylie encreafed,fiee made meanes to J end 
vntohim byonetfhcr trufiieH feruants to offer her felfevnto him, and become his WifLj ; I o 
Which Moses on this condition entertained , that fee fiould firfi deliuer the Cittie into 
htspoffefion-.whereuntofljeecondefceniing, and Moses hailing taken oath to perfirme ■ 
this contract, bath the one and the other were injiantly performed. 



\. II. 

^J. difpute againft the tale of I o s e p h v s. 

THis talc (whereof Mofes hath not a word) hath lofephus fafhioned, and therein 
alfo vtteiiy miftaken himfelfe, in naming a Cittie of Arabia , for a Cittie oM: - ao 
thiopia ■. as he names Ethiopia it felft to haue beene the Countrie of Mofeshis Wife, • 
when (indeede) it was Arabia. For Saba is not in Ethiopia , but in Arabia , as both 
Strabo and all other Geographers, ancient and moderne teach vs, faying that the v 
Sab&ans are Arabians, and not ^Ethiopians ; except lofephus can perfwade vs, that the 
Qgeene of Saba which came from the South to heare the wifedome of 'Salomon, 
were a Tifgro, or Black-Moore. And though Vamianus a G^fpeate of certaine let- 
ters to the King of Portugal/ from Prefer iohn,ohhc Abifines ; wherein that ^Ethio- 
pian King would perfwade the Portugals that hee was defended of the Queene of 
Saba, and of Salomon ; yet it doth no where appeare in the Scriptures, that Salomon 
had any Sonne by that great Princeffe : which had it beene true , it is likely that 30 
when Stjliac King oi Egypt inuaded Boboam, and fickt Hierufalcm, his brother (the 
fonne of Saba and Salomon) who ioy ned vpon Egypt, would both haue impeached 
that enterprize,as alfo giuen aide and fuccour to B oboam againft Ieroboam,who drew 
from him'ten of the twelue Tribes to his owne obedience. Neither is it any thing 
againft our opinion oiMoJes his wife, to haue beene an Arabian , that the Scriptures 
teach vs, that Mofes married the daughter of /ethro Prieft olLMidian or Madim: 
which {landing on the North coaft of the Red Sea, ouer againft the body of E- 
gypt, and neare Ejion Gaber,where Salomon prouided his Fleet for India , in the Re- 
gionof Edom, may well be reckoned as a part of Arabia , as the Red Sea is called Si- 
nus Arabicus. YoxEdum&a ioyneth to the Tribe ofluda by theNorth,to Arabia Pe- 40 
traa by the Eaft, to the Mediterran by the Weft , and to the Red Sea by the South- 
eaft. And if we marke the way which Mofes tooke when he left Egypt, ^.vA condu- 
ced ifrael thence , it will appeare that hee was no ftranger in Arabia: in the border 
whereof, and in ArabiakBk, hee had formerly liuedfortieyeares ; where it fee- 
meth, that befides his carcfull bringing vp in Egypt, hee was inftrufted by lethro in 
the Egyptian learning. For lofephus confeffeth, and S 1 . Stephen confirmeth,that he 
was learned in all the wifedome of thcEgyptians. But on theother fide this Text - 
makes much againft lofephus , where it is written in Exodus the fecond. Therefor^ 
MosEsfledjrom Phahao, and dwelt in the land of 'Madtan or Midmn, and not in 
Ethiopia. And in the third Chapter it is as plaine as wordes can expreffe , in what p 
Region Madtan was, where it is written. When Moses keptthejhepeofl ethro 
his Father in law, Priest ofMadian , and draue theflocke to the Defert , and came to thiLJ 
mount aine of 'Cod inHoreb. Now that mount Horeb is not in Ethiopia, eueryln- 
fantknoweth. And ifweemaybelecue^/^himfdife, then was not the Wife of 

Mops 



I 



fan 



aotheii 

oil:-. 



m 



bounw 






'V. 



'H 



»tt fcc J'J ai 
■ , m 'kw,„. 

a , utt «m 



,..<$■■ 



><<"!/>' 



j^-vf 



v-^U 



■■■■ 



^^^M.io.].} : j f^H^is ftbeJVo^ 



Mofa purchafcd in that manncrwhich fofet>/vi< ve^^u r i • 1 T~T~ — 

^/^.•neitherwaslbee a ^, but a JSS A™ u' ^ of ^> ° r 
S^thiwsbvthj^pl^ x And ^.god workcthth e ?»« 

• /^fitt.ngbya Well (asd.fconfolateandaftrangcr^defcEdcdS r° f ^ 

from the other fheep-heards and drew . a "f r ' aetcndcd thc daughters ofRemel Ea j.*. 

10 From hencealfo came /^ to W^m/WW,™ „^f r' V 

' dingthcmfupportablegouernementiffuSttkS 
bute this waightie charge, and to make Gou™« 3?' 5 r ^ him t0 d,ftrt '- 
Familie. And ifJ^^biJ^S^^i^ ^^ 1 ^^ 
b'mtohauepaffedthroughall^w^ 

to haue found Mofes ,n th? border EiZS£ °A^ > "? 
that fauoured him. Butthepaffingof^tb IhS? ? W'. and a11 
*-^/FOUCtfa,that^>>^ 
cond time he wandered fortie veares S n P m Whch the ft " 

inurudthechiidreno^/TnrknowTed «oKSS?ht SO P liS , ficke ? 
ao them to thc land of plentieand reft ForheSnd T n ' j ' h f C br ° U g ht 

• of Idolatrie, and obtateS S£ S tfa^^fi^ ! H ,BU ? lke 



I?I 



t. III. 

Cw sn ill expounded for ^tbwpi*, Ezech. ap. l6 . 

wasne^e^i^ SZ^^^ 

ISmi&iZjt T T ^^ ^othebordersoflB^Z: 
tSrTZft ^ S c S dhaue ^, n «husconuerted : ^4^S, 

rfS£ ra J e J orders f^^tothe^fe / ^,,hathnorenfeataU.Si 

l™dof& 

land of the Black-Moores. So as i? Nabuchodowforfconquh had beene but hlZ 

J CTV ^n«hc n theconqu e ftofdl that land andCounmyyinebS 
£^****w W h er e both the Countries ioync tog tir § o II theNol 



if any manfoughtto expreffebythefe two bSXco^ftS 



t* 





g 


3 3 J 


' 


liS 


' 


SS.3 
ESS 

:.- - g 


; 

: 

S 



England • 




152 Thefirjl c BookgoftbefirJlpart Chap.S.^.io.j.^.?. 



I 



^ 



„ 583 EJ 

- tf"° ° 

°- 7 

o 






<(f 



England : Wa rwick hec'm^ the North border ofE ngland, mSeuench or Syeneisxhc 
South boundof ^Sgypt , feared in Thebaida which toucheth Ethiopia. But by the 
words of Euchtel it appcareth, that Nabuchodonofor neuer entrcd into any part of 
e^fc>/%«,although the Septuagintjhc Vulgar, the G<?w tf^and all other(in effect jhaue 
written lAithiopia for C^«/?>. 



f. I HI. 

An otherplaceofEzECHizi.c. ^o. v. 9. in like manner miftaken. 



10 



ANd as the former,fo is this place otE&cchiel miftaken, by being in this fort con- 
uerted. In die ilk egredientur nuncij a facie mea in trieribm ad confer endam tAlthi- 
tpia confident iam : Which place is thus turned in Englifh by the Geneuans. In that day 
/ball there mefjengersgoe • forth 'from mee in fbips to make the carelejje Moores afraid. Now „ , , 
the Latinc for (ihips) hath the Grecke word trieres for triremes which are Galleyes of HC? 
three bankes,and notfhips. But that in this place the translation fhould haue beene 
(as in the former) amended by vfing the word Ciw/Z>, or ^Arabia for tAZethiopia or 
the black Moores, euery man may fee which meanly vnderftandeth the Geography 
of the world,knowing,that to paffe out of tA^.gypt'vaxa Ethiopia there neede no gal- 
leys nor fbips,no more then to paffe out oiNorthampton into Leiceflerfiire : zAithio- 20 
pia being the conterminate Region with lAlgypt, and not diuided fbmuchas bya 
riucr. Thercforein this place oiEzechielit was mcant,that from i&gypt Nabuchodo- 
nofor fhould fend galleys alongft the coaft ofthe Red fea,by which an Army might 
bee tranfported into Cdrabia the happy and the ftony (fparing the long wearifome 
march ouerall lAlgypt and the defarts oFPharan) which Army might thereby fur- 
priic them vnawares in their fecurity and confidence. For when "Nabuchodonofor 
was at Seucneb within a mile of 'Ethiopia , hee needed neither Galley nor Shippe to 
paffe into it: becing all one large and firmeland with <&£gypt,and no otherwife par- 
ted from it, then one Inland (hire is parted from an other -and if hee had a fancy to 
haue rowed vp theriuer but for pleafiire,hee could not haue done it: for the fall of ^ 
Ndm (tumbling ouer high and fteepy mountaines) called Catadupa Nili were 
at hand. 

Laftly, as I haue already obferued,the fbnnes of eueryfatherfeated th emfelu es as 
neexejogether as poffibl y they could ,_ GomerandTiis fonneslh ~A~fa thelefle; lauan 
and his fbnnes in Greece and the Iflands adioyning ; shem in Verfia and Eaftward. So 
the fonnes and Grand-children oFchufb from theriuer of Gf^» (their fathers firft 
feat) inhabited vpon the fame, or vpon fbme other continuat vnto it,as Nimrod and 
Hauilah on the one fide,and Saba,Sheba,and Sabtecha ( with the reft) did on the other 
fide. Andtoconcludeinaword,theHebreweshadneuer any acquaintance or fel- 
low(hip,any warre,treaty of peace.or other intelligence with the Ethiopian blacke a 
moores,as is already remembrcd in the Chapter ofParadife. 



t- V. 

A Place E s a y 1 8. v. 1 . Mike manner corrupted by taking 
Chuflifor (^Ethiopia. 

A Nd as in thefe places before remembred,fbindiuers other is the word tAEthio- 
<L *pia put for Arabia or Cbu/h, which puts the ftory (where it is Co vnderftood) 
quite out of fquarej one kingdome thereby being taken for another. For what fenfe 5 
hath this partofScripture Efay 1 8. Va term Cymbalorum alarum qua eft trans flumina 
tAlthiopu, or according to the Septuagint in thefe words. Va terra nauium alarum qua 
eft trans fluuios lAithiopia? Wo to the landfbadowing with wings, which is beyond the riuers 
*>f%Aitbiopia, fending Ambajfadm byfea/uen in veffels of reeds vpon thwaters.Fa terra 

ymbrofa 













Hi 



*iti 



#5 



, 



^^ 



C h a p . 8 .§- l ° • t' 6 • of the Hiftorie of the World. 



m 



•vmbrof£or*:Woe tothelandofthe fhadie coaf, hith lumus. The former tranflators vn- 
dcrftand it in this fenie.That the waters are (liadowed with the failes, which are fig- 
nificatiuely called the wings of the (hips , t he tther, that the Coaft of the Sea was 
fhadowed by the heightof the land. 

But to the purpofe.- That this land heere ipoken of by the Prophet Efay is v£gypt 
no Interpreter hath doubted. For they were the Egyptians that lent this rnelfage 
to the Israelites which Efiy repcateth, and by the former tranflation euery man may 
iecthetranlpofitionofKingdomes: forhecreby^^nstranlportcd vnto the o- 
thcr fide of Ethiopia, and Ethiopia let next vnto India, when it is the land of chuff) 
*° and oihz&indcede that licth between India and ^Egypt, and not Ethiopia, which 
is feated \nc\crxhc tyEfiinoJidl line. And of this Beroaldw asketh a material], questi- 
on /to witjwhat Region thatfhould be,of which the Prophet fpeaketh , and pla- 
ceth it beyond the riuers of tA.thiopia: 2(am deignotaagiregione dm nequit. Forit can- 
not beefidthathetreatetb of an -vnknowneregion. Now if Ethiopia it lelfe be vnder 
xheisiptinoclidllme, with whom the lewes had neuer any acquaintance, why 
fhould any man dreame that they had knowledge of Nations farre beyond it again, 
and beyond the riuers o?*/Etki#j>ia? except wee (hall impioufly thinke that the Pro- 
phet fpakehec knew not what, or vfed an impertinent difcourfc of thofe nations, 
which were not dilcouered in 1000. yeares after, inhabiting as farre Ibuth as the' 
ao Cupe of goodhope fommorXy knowne by tho.mme of Bona ejperanza. 



If+ 



t- VI. 

■That vpon the like m flaking, WTmiham in theftory of Sun*. 

CHER.IB, WZera intheffory of As A arevn- 

aduifedly made ts£thiop>ians. 

A Nd by this tranflation is the ftory ofSemcherib vtterly miftaken in the caufe of 
■^hisretrait. For6>Ww£wasfirftrepulied ztPelufmm, at the very entrance 

30 or tAEgypt from India: when hauing certainc knowledge that Thtrrhacd, (which all 

theintcrpreters call King of ^thhpiafw® on the way tofet on him, he besanne to ^"- »«i 
withdrawh.mfelfe.andfcaringtoleauehisArm.yin two parts,hefent thttatning 
mdiengers toEzeclm King of luda perfwading him to fubmic himfelfe : the tenour 
whereof is let downc in the fecond of Kingsin thefe wordsMaueany of the Gods of the 
mttm delmeredhs land out of the hands of the King of^iflmr ? Where is the God of 
Hamah .? &c.By which proud Amballage, ifhe had obtained entrance into Hieruft- 
^.hce-then meant to haiie vnitcd that great Army before Htemfdem commanded 
by Rabfckeh\mh the other which lay before Pelnfum,a great City vpon the branch 
of 3fto# next Arabia. For Senachenb had already maiftered the moft part of all thofe _. , , 

40 Cities inJudtnnd Beniamin w \th a third Armie, (which himfelfe commanded) be- g * 
ing then attheiiegeofZ^w.Butvpon the rumour of that Arabian Armie led by 
their King Thirrhakehfwhom fefeptms calls Thar fees) Rabfikeh halted from the fiegc 
oiH,ernfdem ,md found Senachenb departed from Z^/fc and fet down before Lebna, 
which was afterwards called Eleuthoropolts^Comc haue fuppofed. Butwhilq hee 
nad,llf uccc ir e at Pekfum and feared rW;^God himfelfe whome he leaft fea- 
red Itrooke his Army before Htemfdem by the Angell ofhis power , fo as 1 85000 
were found dead in the place a< in the life ofmdfi^s is hecreafcer more largely 
writfcn.And thatthis Army ofTirrakehwas from Arabia,Iofepbushimfd?e makes it 
plaine. Forheconfeffcth in the tenth bookc the firlt Chapter of the Aivcrantiqui- 

50 tics, that it was come to Senachenbs knowledge, that the Army which was a foote 
(both torcheue the Egyptians and the Awes) marched towards him by the way 
oftheCf/frf.-Nowthci^r/whichlay indifferent betweene Hierufalen, » and Pth- 
ftim, wasthat ofPhoran or Sur which alio toucheth on thethree>«fc*w to wit 
the ftony, of which it is a part ; the Defert, and the Happy ; and by no other way in- 

deede 



dmiq.l.to. 



' L.m.c<* 



5 883 ' 



It* 




<»- 



Iff 



Thefirft c Boo{eoftbefirfipart Ch ap.S.^.io. f / 



I s?; -: 



1 



^ 



o 



Pfe.f.j.c.j; 



jir>- 



cfcw.i.c.-i^. 



IfJ 



»//:<- 



deede could the Arabians come on to fnccour either Pelufium or Hierufilem. But, 
that there is any Defer* bctweene iV/«/W, and the South part of ^//tf , hath ne- 
uer yet beene heard of, or defcribed by any Cofmographer or UiHonm. So then this 
Scripture of the fecond of Kings, verfe the ninth, hath the fame miftaking as the 
reft. For here the word ( chufb ) is a!fo tranflatcd Ethiopia ; and in this fenfe haue 
all the Interpreters , (but litmus) exprefled the beginning of the ninth verfe. Hee_j 
heard dfo menfay x of T h i b. k h a k. bh A7ȣ */ Ethiopia , &c. whereas it fhould 
haue beene thus conucrted with lumits. Audtens autem de T h t a r.h a k'± h jftwir 
C/»/& , /te hearddfi </Thiuiukeh A'w£ <?///*? Chufh'ttes. for they were the 
chtifitesmd Arabiam,-whoCc houfes and Citties were next the fire, and vpon whom z © 
the very fmoke of//^ flaming was blowne , being their nearcft neighbours : and fo 
were not the Ethiopian Black-Moores vnder the Equinoitid, whom neither wane 
nor P £„ce ( which difcoucreth all Regions) cuer found out, GnthPhme. For this 
King was no more K ing of Ethiopia then Zerah was, who inuaded Afa King of lu- 
^ with an Annie of a Million and 3 ooo. Charriots. Indecde, how fuch an Annie 
and thofe Charriots lhould paffe through all ^Egypt , ( the Kings of rfjw feeing 
mightie Kings) letallmenthat know how thefe Regions are feated, and howfarrc 
diftant, mdge. For Princes doe not eafily permit Armies of a Million to runnc 
through them; neither was there cuer any fuch ftrengthof Black-Moores herd 
of in that part of the world, or elfewhere. Neither are thefe Ethiopians fuch trauai- 23 
lersorconojuerours; andyetisthisKing^^alfocalledKingof^/%«. But 
the word C^beingfirftfoconuerted for Ethiopia, the reft of the Interpreters 
(not looking into the feates of Kingdomes, or the pofflbiltties of attempts, or infla- 
tions) followed one another in the former miffakings. 



t. V 1 1. 

'A farther ex pofitioh of the places. Esai. 18. t.' 

/^Oncerning thefe wordes in that eighteenth Chapter of Efii, Hamum alarum, 20 
^^ winged fitps,(rothcSeptitagintturnck) or Cymbalo alarum (according to the La- 
tine) failesivkjilmg in the windes, or terra vmbrof*. or* ( after Iur.im ) the land of a fid- 
dowed coast, or the land [hadoxcing with wings, as our Englifh Geneva hath it. The two 
firft interpretations of the Septuagmt and S l .Hieromehaac one fenfe in effecr.For the 
f ailes are co mmonly callcd-the -wirjg§.ojLaJhiDjand we vfe to fay ordinarily when 
on rthipsiail eTlowly, that fhee wanteth wings: (that js) when her failes are either 
worne or too narrow , and " weal]oWtEe fame phrafcofthe wmdc whiftling in the ' 
failes. Anditmaybethatthee^^tewemployedfo many of thofe fmall fhips, 
as their failes were faid to giue a fhadow ouer the Red Sea. But to make both inter- 
pretations good, Pintm (vpon Efd) affirmeth, that the word (Saba!) doth fignifie 40 
both to fhadow and to gingle (which is) to make a kindeof Cymbaline fourtd : fo as 
the meaning of this place (faith Pintus) is this. Woe to thee, o Egypt, which doe (I pro- 
mife to others fafegard, vnder the fhadow of 'thyivings, which (indeedc) feemethtoa- 
gree with the argument of the eighteenth Chapter of Efd : and this phrafe is often 
elfewhere vfed, as in the fixteenth Pfalme, Sub vmhr'adarum tuarUm protege me, Be- 
fendme vnder the fhadow of thy wwgs.The Boats ofreede fpoken ofareoftwo kinds- • 
either of basket; willow couered with hides (as anciently in Brittainejor a tree made 
hollow in thebottome , and built vpon both fides with Canes. Of the one forLL 
haue feene in Ireland, of the other in the Indies. 



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$. XI. 

0/ rf>f Plantation and Antiquities of Egypt/ 



10 




f. I. 

7>W M i z s. a i m the chiefe planter of Egypt , and the rest oftht^ 

Sonnes »/Ham, were feated in order, onz^> 

by another. 

HefecondSonneof HamwastMizraim, who (according to the place 



of a iecond brother) .'was lent (bmewhat farther off to inhabite. F 



ror 



Chufi firft poffeft Chald&i on the Weft fide of Gehon chiefly : and from 
thence , as hee increased in people , fb hee entred Arabia, and by time 
came to the border of the Red Sea , and to the Southeaft-fide'of lu- 
d.ta. Mizraimhis brother (with Pfe/)paftolier into Africa. M iz,ram held -Egypt : 
and Phut (as a third brother) was thruft father off into Mauritania. Canaan topkp 
the Sea-coaft , and held the fide of PaUfrma .- and thelc foure brothers poffeft all 
that Traclofland, from Gehon in Chaldta, as farre to the Weft as the Mediterran 
20 Sea: comprehending all ^Arabia Deferta, and Petrxa, all Canaan which embraceth 
GaliUa, Samaria, and Iudu ; with the two Egypts , whereof the nether is bounded 
by Memphis on the South , and by the Mediterran Sea on the North : and Thebatda. 
(called the vppcr Egypt) ftretcheth it felfe toward the South as farre as Syene, the 
border ohhc Ethiopians or Black-Moores. All thereft ofthe coaft of Africa Weft- 
ward Phut peopled ; which brothers had not any other nation or familie that dwelt 
betweencthcm.'A.nd in thefame manner did all their fonnes againe , and all the 
fonnes of ther.eftof l^oahs children, fort themfelues. 



t- II. 

ofthe time about which the name of Egypt beganne to be knoirne : and ofthe 
EgyptiansjLunarie yeares, nvhich made their antiquities J £• s~$~>~ 
feme the more fabulous. .,1'-^ ,^>" ^i£ 



30 



r TT His flounlbingKingdome poffeft by Miz,raim, changed her ancient name, and 
*■ became Egypt, at fuch time as Egyptus (otherwife Ramefjes, as fome thinke) 
the lbnnecf&/».f chafed thence his elder brother Danaus , fhifting him into that 
part of Greece now called Morea, by whom the Argiues were made Darni, abando- 
ning their proper names : which happened 8 7 7. veares after the floud , in the time 

40 6£lffita,as S. ^«g-«/?/'#£'coniecl:urethout oi'Eufebiiis. But in Homers Odyffes it ap- 
peareth that the Egyptians were fb called at the time ofthe Troian warre. And be- 
fore this, Egypt was knowne by diuers other names , as Oceana^ Aria, ofiriana, &c. 
And Manethon (whom lofephmkitcth in his firft bookeagainft Appionjnumhrah all 
the Kings o^Egypt after Mofes departure, who confumed 393. yeares. By which 
other men coniccfure, that the Egyptians tooke on them that name 330. yeares ap 
terfojm, and about 1000. yeares after the floud. But where iofephas in the fame 
booke taketh lfraehobcthoCeHycfes,whkh he alio calleth Pa /lores or Shecp-heards, 
which are laid to haue raigned in Egypt 511. yeares : whom alio he calieth his An- 
cefters, (meaning the Anccfters ofthe lewes) in this^ lam fare he was grpflydecei- 

y o tied, or that he vainely bojifted : for the ifraeliteshad no fuch Dominion as Manethon 
fainethTnof abode in Egypt fb long a time by many yeares. 

Of the Egyptian Antiquities there are many fancies in Trogiis, Herodotus, Plato, 
BiodSiculits, Mela, and others. For they affirmc ( faith Pomp. Mela Jthatthere had 
raigned in Egypt 330. Kings before Amafrs , who was contemporarie with Cyrus ; 

and 



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and that they had memorie and ftorie of 13000. ycarcs ; and that the ftarres had 
fburc times changed their cdur'fe, and the Sunne twice let in the Eaft. Thefe riddles 
are alio rife among the ^Athenians and Arcadians, who dare af&mc that they are 
more a ncient th en Afiter and the Moone , whereof Ouid : 

Ante Iouem gentium terras habuijfe fcruniur 
Arcades :& Luna, gens prior ilkfuk. 

The Arcadians the earth inhabited 

Ere yet the Moone did Ihine, or Ioue was bred. 

But for thole 1 3 000. yeares it may well bec true : lecing it is cer taine that t he &•&■ 
gyptians reckon their yeares by Moneths, which makes after that account not aboue 
1 000. or 1 1 o .yeares, whether wee take their Moneths or Lunarie yeares to haue 
becne of the firftkinde ofay, dayes and eight houres; orotherwileao.dayesa'nd 
tweluehourcs 5 or after any other of thole fine diuerlitics oftheir Lunarie yeares. 



10 



t. III. 
■Of -certaine vaine djjertions of the Atttiquitie of the 
Egyptians. 



10 



G! 



iEk.ak.dvs M e r. c a t o r. in his chronologie , realbneth for the nALgyptians an- 
' tiquitie in this manner : T hat the fixteenth Dymltie (where Eufibws begins to 
reckon the tAEgyptians times) had beginning with the generall floud: and that there- 
fore the firft of the other fifteene reached the creation, or Ibone after it. To which 
conjecture of Mercator , Vererim maketh this anfwere. That therein Mercator was 
firft decerned, becaufe he taketh it for granted, that the beginning of the fixteenth 
Dyna/iiewas at once with the generall floud : which Eufebws makQih 292. yeares af- 
ter, and in the time of Abraham. Secondly, JV/frw^r maketh the beginning of the 30 
(fccep-heards DynaBia (being in number the 1 7.) in the time oftheir firft King, Sal- 
7#, to haue becne in the yeare of the world 1846. which Eufebws findeth in the 
worlds age 2 1 40. For the 1 6. Dynaflia was begunnebut in the 292. yeare after the 
floud ,as they account, and continued 100. yeares. Thirdly, whereas Mercator ma- 
keihemry Dynastia to endure 1 1 y.yearcs,£«/ffo^reckoncthmanyofthematleflc 
then 1 00. yeares: for the 28. had but 6". yeares; the 29. but 20. and the 30. but 
1 8. ycarcs. 

Now Ann'w in his Supplement of Manethon zf&rmeth, That all thefe 1 5. Byna- 
_/ifolaftedbut 1 61. yeares .-and that the firft of the 15. begannebutin the 131. 
yeare after the floud rlbas where Mercator makes all the 15.10 precede the floud, a 
and the 1 6\to haue beene then in being at the time of the f\oud,AnniM makes them 
nil after it. But thecemtrarietieof fallhood cannot bee hidden, though difguifed. 
For Annius had forgotten his former opinion and~a!Tertion , that it was in the 1 3 1. 
yeare -that Nimrod with the lonnes of l^oah came into the Valley of Shmaar : Co hee 
forgets the time which was confumed in the building of Babel: and that before the 
•confufion of fpeech there was no difperfion , nor farrc-oft" plantation at all. And 
though he haftily conueyed Gomer'mto Italie, and Tubal into Spaine, in the 1 o. yeare 
of Nimrods raigne : (which was ten yeares after his arriuallinto Babylonia) yet herein 
he is more vnaduilcd. For he makes v£gypt poffeft, and a gouernement cftablifhcd 
in the very firft yeare ofthearriuall of Nimrod into shinaar, before all partition, or 59 
any expedition farre off or nearein queftion : for from thence (that is, from Babel) did 
the Lord fatter thcmvponaHthe earth, 

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157 



t. 1 1 1 1. 

^Jgawjl P er e b. ! v s : th.tiitisnotvnltkcly i but that \AZgyptWits peopled 

wtthimoo. yeares after the creation-, atUaft,thatbotbit i 

and the most parti of the world were peopled 

before the fiend. 

T> Vt whereas Pircrius feeketh to ouerthrow this Antiqiiitie of the ^gyptians^ 
A-* touching their Dynafties, (which Eufebms doth not altogether deftroy , but lef 
, fen) I doe not findc any great ftrength in this opinion of Pererius 5 ( to wit ) that it 
was either vnlikely or iinpoffible that tAEgypt ihould bee peopled within 100. or 
loo. ycares after ^yidam, in the firft age. And whereas he fuppofeth that it was not 
inhabited at all before the gencrall floud,I doc verily beleeue thecontrarie: and that 
not only of ,/Egypt,but the better part of all the world was then peopled : Pererius 
his wordes are thefc. Quomodv emm primes mundi ducentos,veletiam centum annos A- 
d a m r proles adeo mtdtiplicari potuit ,-vtad ^Egyptum vfque habit andum & cemplend.mn 
propagatafit, &c. For how could the chHdren of Ankubefo multiply edm the first two 
hundred, or m the fir Jl hundred y ear es oft he world, andfi propagated as to inhabite and fill 
<L£gypt ? for allowing this (iaith Pererius Jwe muff alio confefle,that there were then 
io both the Ajfyrians, and other Nations. 
■ . Now feeing that the Scrip tur es are.filc fat herein, and that it isfab point of ourfa- 
uing belcefc , it is lawfull for cuery man to bee guided in this and the like queftions 
by the beit reafon, qrcumftance, and likelyhood ; and herein, as in the reft, I pj^teft 
. that I doe not gainfay any majisoginionout of any croffing or cauelling humour : 
for I thinkeit the part ofeuery CEHftian , rather to reconcile differences , where 
there is pgmbihtic of vnion,then out of f'roward fubtletie.and prciudicate refblued- 
ncfle, to maintaine factions needleffe, and dangerous contentions. 

Firft,therefore to this opinion, that <s£gypt was hot planted fo foone after Adam, 
no not at all before the floud , I fay that there is no reafon why wee ihould °iue a 
3 o eiie mcreafe to the fonnes oUdam,then to the fonnes ofMah. For their length of 
lite, which exceeded thofe which came after the floud doublc,and(aftcr a few years) 
treble, is an infallible proofe of their ftrength and abilitie, to beget many children - 
and at that time they obferued no degrees of kindred, nor confanguinitic. And 
that there was a fpcedie mcreafe of people, and in great numbers, itmayinfome 
ortappearebythis, thatCW*, who ( being fearcfull that the death of Abel would 
taucbccnereuengcdonhim) withdrew bsmfelfeffomthereft, which wereafter- 
ward begotten, and dwelt in the land of AW, and therc,by thehelpe of his owne if- 
iues bin t a Cittic, (called Enochjnfter the name of his firft borne. Now if it bee ga- 
thered that Mmrodcame into the Valley of Shinaar wkh fo many multitiides,as fuf- 
•io heed to build the Cittie and Tower of Babel: and that to this increafe there was gi- 
uen but 1 30. ycares by Berefus,znc\ after the account of the Scriptures (reckoning, 
as it is commonly vndcrftood, by the birth of ^Arphaxad, SeLth, Heber, and Phde#) 
but one hundred and one ycare : I fee no caufe to doubt , but that in the infancie of 
the hilt age, wnen the bodies of men were moft perfect, cuen within 130. yeares* 
the ame (if not a greater) number might be increafed ; and fo within yo.ycares af- 
ter (that is, by fuch time as the world had flood 1 00. yearcs) afwell ^Jffyria, SyrU 
and v£gypt might be poiTeft before the floud , as they were within the fame orlefTe 
time attcr it. Neither doth it agree with the circumftance, or true ftorie ofthe &fy- 
lenian and Affyrhn Empire , that all thofe people , which were increafed in the firft 
nundred or 1 3 p. ycares after the floud, came into shmaar and Babylonia^ For that e- 
uerAC«MiimfelfecamcoutoftheEaft, as there is no Scripture or Authoritieto 
proue it, fo all probable conjecture and reafon it felfc denies it. Againe , thofe mul- 
titudes and powerfull numbers, which Semwamis (but the third from Nimrod I 
found m /tf^confidered with her owne Armic of three Millions, (and fhee left not 

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ail her Kingdomes emptic) doc wellproue, that if the world had foch pkntieof 
people in lo fewycares after thejlojid,, jt might alio bee as plentiiijj]y_lillccijij like 
time before it. ..tor after their owne account Mms goucrned Babylonia and Ajjyru 
but 2pi . yearcs after the floud ofl^eah. And thefe troupes of Semiramis were ga- 
thered out of all thole Eafternc Kingdomes , from Media, to the Mediterran Sea ; 
when there had now paft from the floud to the time of this her inuafion, lomcwhat 
lcffe or more then 3 60 . yearcs : for.much more time the true chronologic cannot al- 
low ; though I confefie, thatinrefoe&oftheffjaiigegrcatnefle-of SemiramifAr? 
mie, and the incredible multitudes gathered, this is as Ihort a time as can well be gi- 
ucn. And if but the one halfe be true of that which is laid , That her Armie coiiii 
ftcdof 1 300000. footmen, and jooooo.horfemcn, itmuftnecdesbee, thatlong 
before Scmiramu raigne, the grcateft part oi'Ajia ( whence her huge Armie was ga- 
thered) was full of people: yea Arabia it felfc (much part whereof is barren) muft 
long before this time of Semirainis haue becne plentifully peopled ; when Alnnsha- 
uing a determination to make h imfclfc Mafter of all Nations, entrcd (notwi thftan- 
ding) in league with the King thereof: whom therefore he either feared , or fought 
his affiftancc. And if Arabia were then fo well replenifhed , I lee no caufe but *•£- 
1 gypt might alfo be peopled. Now if wee may beleeue Tragus Pompe'ms (Epitomi£d 
by luHine) ts&gypt was a moftflourifhing and magnificent Nation before 2^mus 
was borne. For thefe be his owne wordes, /peaking of Zirrnis. Fuere auidemtempo- 20 
ribus antiquiorilms V e x o r i s Rex tALgypi, &c. But there were in times more ancient 
V ExoRis Kingof ^Egyft, and T anus Ktngof the Scythians : of which the one 
inuaded Pontus, the other tAigypt. And how full of people all that part of the world 
was, the concjuefts oiNmtis witnefTe, who fubducd with no final! force the ^Arme- 
nians, the Medes, and afterwards the Baclrians; yea, all that whole.body of Aj7a on 
this fide India .For Diodorus out.of Ctejias numbreth the Armie , wherewith Mms 
inmded Zeroasier, at 1 700000. footmen, and2 0oooo.horferncn:andthcfl:ories 
generally fhew, that though Zoroajlers Armie was fare fhort ofthisyet it was grea- 
ter then any that thole parts ofthe world cuer fince bcheld.But to what end mould 
Ifeckcforforraineauthoritie ? fornornandoubtethbutthat^g^waspoiTeftby 30 
M!x.rahn,thcfor\nzo£l-Iam; and that it wasaneflablifhedKingdcme, filled with 
many Citties in Abrahams time, the Scriptures tell vs. And fore to prepare and cul- 
tiue a defolate and ouergrowne ground , to beautifie it with many Citties , Lawes, ' 
and pollicics, cannot be efteemed a labour of a few dayes : and therefore it muff bee 
inhabited in a leffetimethen 200. yearcs after the floud; and in the fame time (if 
not in a fhortcr) before the floud. For if fb many Millions of men were found with- 
in 300. ycaresafterthcgenerall floud.; fo as not only Babylon, and AjJyria,Baclria, 
Armenia, Media, Arabia, tAigypt,PaUJlina, yea the farre-on 7 Lybia on the one fide, 
and India on the other, and Scythia (inferiour to neither) were all filled : into what 
frnall corners could then all thofe nations be compreft,which 1 6 j d.yearcs brought 40 
forth before the floud ? eucn neceffltic , which cannot bee refifted , cafl theabun- - 
dance of mens bodies into all partsoFthe knowne world ; efpccially , where Death 
forbare the Father, and made no place forth? Sonne, till he had beheld liuingNa- 
tions of his owne body. 



t- v. 

Ofjome othir reajons againjl the opinion ofV 



Et.E8.IVS. 



"P Or what a ftrangeincreafedid the long Hues of the firft age make, when they $0 
■*■ continued 800. orpoo.yeares. Surely, we haue reafon to doubt,that the world 
could not containe them, rather then that they were not fored ouer the world. For 
le^ysjTowjeckon thedatcofourliues mthis ag e of theworld : wh erei n if one cx- 
freede 5 Q-X c J r £g2ffnfol r one are cut off in that paflage, and yet w e findeno want of 

people; 









"•Hi 



'' rAr inie m ,,i; , 



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CHAP.S.^.U.f.?. o/>/^ Hijione of the World. 



159 



people; nay, wc know the multitude fuch, as if by warres or pcftilence they were 
not fomctimes taken of by many t housands, the earth with all the induftrie o'f man 
could not.giue them foode. What ftrange heapes then of foules had the firft ages, 
who enioyed 800. or poo. yeares, as aforefaid. Thcfe numbers, I fay, cannot bee 
counted nor concerned. For it would come to the lame reckoning in effect, as if all 
thofe which hauc beene borne in Brittamc firtce 3 . or 4. hundred yeares before the 
Norman Conquest (fauing fuch as by accidentorby violence were cutoff) were now 
flliue; and if to thcfe there were added as many as by Polmmte might haue beene 
increafed. For (to omit, thattheGmntsandmightieoneloftKefirftageobferued 
1 » no law of matrimonie)it is to be thought that tho/e louers of the world and of plea- 
fore, when they knew the long and liberail time which Nature bad giuen them, y 
would not willingly or haftily prefent thc-mfckies to any danger which they could C 
flie from or efchew. For what humane argument hath better perfwafion to make / 
men carclcfTcoflife, and feareleffe of death, then the little time which kecpes them 
' afunder, and that fhorttime alio accompanied with fo manypaines and difeafes, 
which this cnuious old age of the world mingleth together, and Ibweth with the 
/cedes of mankindc ? 

Now ifthat^^/wor^wi/^may'bealleaged for fufficient Authours,whorn Pe- 
rmits himlelfcin this cmeftion citeth , then is it by them affirmed , and by-Jojcpkm 
20 confirmed , that the Cittic of 'Enoch was fasted neaitLybanw in Syria .- ancfif other 
parts o^ Syria were peopled in Cains time, I fee no caufe why Fohsltwa (which is alfb 
a Prouince of 'Syria,) and *s£gypt ( which neighboured! it ) could bee left defolate 
both all the life time of Cain , and all thofe times betweene his death and the floud 
which were by eftimation 700. or 800. yeares. And fur'e though this Fragment of 
Berofrs with Anmushis Comment bee very ridiculous in many places ( the ancient 
Coppies being corrupted or loft) yet all things in Berofrs are not to bee rejected. 
Therefore $'. Hierome for Cuch Authours giues a good rule. Bona eorum eliramus, 
■vitemtts contraria, Let vs choofe what is goo dm them, andreiecJ the reft. And certainly' 
in the very beginning of the firft Booke,Berofrs agreeth (in effect) with Mofesjauch- 
30 ing the generall floud : and in that firft parr Bert fits affirmeth , that thofe mightic 
Men and Giants wh ich inhabited £»«4commandcd ouer all Nations.and f ubiectcd 
the vniuerlall world : and though that phrafc ( of all the world) be often vied in the 
Scriptures for a part thereof; asinthefecondof the Affs. That there were dwellmc 
at Hierufilem Iewes , men that feared Godofeucry Nation vnder heaucn : yet by wordes 
which follow in Berofrs, it is plaine that his wordes and fenfc were the fame : for hee 
addcth from the Sunnes riling to the Sunncs letting, which cannot be taken for any 
fmall part thereof. Againe, we mayiafelycomecture, that Noah did not part and 
proportion the world among his fonnesataducnture, or left them asdilcouerers, *- 
but diredted them to thofe Regions which he formerly knew had beene inhabited! 
40 And it cannot be denyedthattheearth wasmorcpafiableandeafietotrauailcouer 
before the floud, then after it. For Pfm-zWhimfelfcconfefTeth , that Attica (by rca- 
fonofrnuddeandfliniewhich tbewatcrlcftvpon the earth) was vninhabitedaoo. 
yeare^after Ogyges floud, whereby wee may gather that there was no great pfeaitire ' -* ! 
lnpaffingintofarrcCountricsafterthegencralldeluge, when the earth Jay (as it 
were) incopfed for 1 00. or 1 3 o. yeares together. And therefore was the face there- 
of in all conjecture more beautifull, and lefle cumberfome to walkeouer, in the firft 



age then after the generall oucrflowing 



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The fir fl 'Boofy ofi the firfi part C h a p. 8 .^.n.f ,6.y. 
f. VI. 

0/7/;<r jjw</« ^/Moses, G £ n. i o. v. 'ultimo, whereupon Pes.er.ivs 
grounded his opinion. 

LAftly, whereas Pererius drawes this argument out ofthe laft Verfcof the tenth 
oi'Genefis. And out ofthefe were the 'I^ations dmided after the floud; Quofignificatur 
Ulem diuifionem nonfuifje ante diluuium-, By which it appeareth (faith Pererim) that there 
was no fuch diuiflon before the floud, which he alio ieeketh to confirme out of the e- 
leuenth ot'Genefls, becaule the diuifion of tongues was caufe ofthe difperfion of the i o 
people. This confequencc, g/wy^/zi/Fcvtfar, cjrc. feemeth to me very weake: the text 
it fe) fc rather teaching the contrarie for out ofthefe (faith Moses) were the Rations 
diuided in the earth after the floud; inferring, that before the floud the Nations were 
diuided out of others , though after the floud out ofthefe only. But wbatfoeuer 
fenfe may be gathered from this place , yet it can no way be drawne to the times be- 
fore the floud , or to any plantation or diuifion in that age : for if there were none 
elfe among whom the earth could be diuided after the floud, but V{oabs Sonnes, 
wherein doth that neceflarie diuifion controle the planting ofthe world before it ! 
And whereas it is alleaged that the confufion of fpcech was thecaufeofthis difper- 
fion, it is true, that it was fb for that prefent ; but if 'Babel had neucr beene built, nor 20 
any confufion of languages at all, yet mcrea/e of people and time would haue enfor- 
I. j, ced a farther-off and generall plantation : as Berofus faics well, that when mankindc 

were exceedingly multiplyed, adcomparandasnouas fedesnecefitascompellebat, They 
■were driuen by necefttie to Jeeke new habitations. Forweefinde (as is before faid) that 
within 3 00. yeares after the floud , there were gathered together into two Armies, 
fuch multitudes as the valley about Babylon could not haue fuftained thofc numbers 
with their increafe for any long time : all Afia the greater and the lefler ; all Scythia, 
Arabia, PaUstina, and tA-gypt, with Greece,and the Iflands thereof ;<JMauritania and 
Lybia being alfo at that time fully peopled. And if we beleeue Berofu-s, then not on- 
ly thofe parts ofthe world, but (within 1 40. yeares after the floud) Spaine, Holies, 30 
and France were alfb planted : much more then may wee thinke , that within 1656. 
yeares before the floud, in the time ofthe chiefeftrength of mankinde,they were re- 
plenifhed with people. And certainely feeing all the world was ouerflowne , there 
were people in all the world which offended. 

■ -- .ir ........ . _ ,. . , 

t. VII. 
i^yi comlufan , refoluing of that which is moH likely, touching the tAlgyptian anti- 
quities : with fomewhat ofPuvr (another Sonne ofH a w) 

which peopled Lybia. ifi 

*Tr Herefore, for the Antiquitie ofthe Egyptians, as I doe not agree with Merca- 
■*■ tor , nor iudge with the Vulgar^ , which giue too much credit to the tAlryptians ' 
antiquities : fo I doe not thinke the report of their Antiquities fo fabulous, "as either 
Pererius or other men conceiue it. But I rather incline to this , That Agypt being 
peopled before the floud, and a 00. or 300. yeares, moreorlcflc after ^4dam, there 
might remaine vnto the Sonnes of CMmram fome monuments (in Pillers or Altars . 
of ftone or mettall) of their former Kings or Gouernours : which the Egyptians ha- 
uing added to the lift and rolleoftheir Kings after the floud,infucceeding time (out 
ofthe vanitie of gloric,or by lome corruption in their Priefts)fbmething beyond the p 
troth might be inferted .And that the memorie of antiquitie was in fuch fort pre- 
ferued, £f/-<?/»^affirmeth it ofthe chddaans, and fo doth Epigenes. Fortheyboth 
write, that the vie of Letters and the Art of Aftronomie was knowne to the Babylo- 
^«w3d34.ycarebeibre^/wWwconqueft : and this report t_^fc«Wfihdeth to 

agree 






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agree and reach to the time of Eno/h,who was borne 1 03 4-yeares before the floud 
and wrote of the worlds deftrucrion, both by Water and Fire ; as alfo of chriffhil 
comming in judgement , as S c . hide hath witnefTed. But Jeauing thefe Antiquities 
to ether mens judgements, andeuerymantohisowncreafbn, I will conclude this 
plantation ofv£gypt. It is agreed by all, that it was peopled hy OMtzramjmd that 
it tookc the name of vtgypt from vEgyptu-s the fonne of Belus , as aforefaid. Being 
diuided into two Regions, that part from Memphis or Nicopclis to the Mediterran 
Sea , was called the inferiour v£gypt ; furnamed alia Delta : becaufe the feuerall 
branches of isijliu breaking afundcr from one body of the Riucr , gaue it the forme 
JO of the Grcckc letter Delta, which istheformeof a Triangle. That branch, which 
rannc toward the North-eaft and embraced the Sea, next vnto the Deferts of Sur 
and Pharan, had on it the Cittie of Pelufitim , where Senacherib was repulfed : The 
other branch, which yceldedit fclfeto the fait watertowards the North-weft, is 
beautified by that famous Cittie of Alexandria: The vpper part o£,y£^ypt is boun- 
ded betweene Memphis and Syene neare ^Ethiopia, and had the name ofThebaida, of 
that ancient Cittie of Thebes , which (according to Htmer) was adorned with 1 00. 
gates : and therefore called Ciuitascentum partarum ■, and by the Greekes Dioftolis- 
in the Scriptures T^o-hamon, which fignificth multitudes of inhabitants , exceeding 
beliefe. lofephits cals ^Egypt Merfin of '<JMiz.raim : and Herodotus affirmes that it had iififh. l.i.Unt. 
2.0 once the name of Thebais. eap. 7 . 

Phut the third fonne of Ham tookc the next portion of land to his brother c^fe- He "> i - EuUr t'- 
raim,md inhabited Lyha : whofe people were anciently called Phutei ; ( fay th lo[e- 
fhits) and Plmie mentioneth the riuer Fut in Mauritania : which riuer from the 1 $ c 1. ■ 
mountaine^/^(knownctotheinhabitantsbythenamepfZ)7r«) he makethto ' 3 

bediftant the fpace of two hundred miles.lt alfo appeareth in the thirtieth chapter 
ofEz-echiel, that Phut, Chufi and Zud were contermini and afTociates with the ./£- 
gyptians. 



f XIL 

Of the eleuen formes of C a n a a n , the fourth finite 



40 



t. t 

of the bounds of the land of Canaan : mth the names of 
his eleuen fonnes. 



V 



f*£jgc$F A n a a n (the fourth fohne oiHam) pofTeft all that Region called by 
» the Romanes Paltstina; in the Scriptures GaliUa, Samaria, and Iudm ; 
in the latter times knownc by the name of the Holy Land and /«- 
ne : the limits whereof are precifelie fet downe by Mofes , Genejis 
the tenth. Then the border of the Canaanites was from Zidon as thou go- 
^t'GerarvniillAz J zah,andasthougoest-vntoSodomeandGomorh , and Admah, and. 
Zeboim,euen vnto Lajh.u Now ho wfoeuer thefe words of the Hebrew Text {as 
thongoeli) beconuerted, Mofes meaning was xYatGerar was the South bound of 
CanaanmdZidonthcNonhiSodomeandGomorhatheEak , and the other Citties 
5 named flood on the frontiers thereof. For Gerar ftandeth in a right line from Gaz,* 
inthc\vay of^gypt, the vttermoft tcrritorie of Canaan Southward • and this was 
properly the land of Canaan. 

Now the Tonnes of Camun which pofTeft this Countrie , and inhabited fome part 
of the borders thereof, were in number eleuen : r 

P 3 I. Zidon 



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Thefirft Hookf oftbefirflpart Ch Ar.8.$.u.t' 2 -3 ■ 



Zidon. 

HethoxChethus. 

Iebitfi ox lebufeus. 

Emori or Emoreut, or Afnorim. 

Girgefhi or Girgefeus. 

Heui or chiueus. 

i_Arki or Harkeus. 

Senior Sin&us. 
p. ^_Araadi or Aruaddus. 

io.ZemarioxSamareus,oxTzemaretts Y<j> 

1 1 1 Hamathi or Hamatheus , or Chamathdus. 

Of which the moft renowned were the Hethites, Gtrgeftes, Amoritts', Heuites, le- 
bufites, and Peri&xitts : which Periz&ites were defended of Zemari or Samareus, or 
fromfbmeofhis. 



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f. II. 

O/Vfe portions «/Zi»on <«/*/ Heih. 

20 

J7 I n o n the firft borne of C4»*s» , built the famous Cittie of Zidon'm Phoenicia, 
*-* which afterward fell in partition to the Tribeof^/S , r.-for^y&y i z^»to ) and 
Nephtali had a great part of the'ancient Phoenicia diftributed among them ; but 
the Afferttes could neuer obtaine Zidon it felfe. 

ThefecondibnneofCVwfcfcw was Heth ox Cethus: of whom came the Hethites, 
oxHittites, one of thofe feuen principall Nations (commaunders of Canaan) ap- 
pointed by God to be rooted out; namely, the Gergefites , the <^Jmorites , the O- 
naanites, the Perizutes, and Heuites,and^herebuftes. The /f/tfzto inhabited about 
Berfobe, and towards ffiirw neere the Torrent 5^r, and about Gf^r, which 
CWofes maketh the vttermoft limit of Canaan , hauing the Defert of Pharan to jo 
the South ; for about Berfabe ( otherwi/e P«/«# iuramenti ) foUre, miles from 
G«&4 dwelt Heth and his pofleritie, as farreto the Northeaft as Hebron, and CMam- 
re ; and of Ephraim the //«&# did Abraham buie the field of Sarahs buriall. Or* • 
which Nation Rebecca bewailed her felfe to ifaac, faying , Thatfhee was rcearie of her 
life [for the daughters of He t h. The Giants ^_Anakim were of thefe Hittites, a ftron g . 
and fierce Nation,whofeentertainement by the Kings oflfraeiagnnh them the Sy- 
rians greatly i'eaied .as in the fourth of the Kings ; jfroel hath hired againji <vs the 
Kings of the Hittttes. 



\. III. 

Of the Iebufttes and Amoritts. 



4° 



T Eb vsasvs , the third fonne of Canaan, of whom came the Iebufites, and whole prin- 
■*■ cipall feat was iebus , (afterward Hierufalem ) were alfo a valiant and ftubborne 
Nation 5 and held their Cittie and the Countrie neere it , till fuch time as Dauidby 
Gods affiftancerecouered both : yet were not the Iebufites extinguifhed , but were 
Tributaries to Salomon. 

Amoreus was the fourth fonne of Canaan, of whom the Amorites tooke name, 
who inhabited that land to the Eaft of lor dan below the Sea of Galilee , hauing Ar- jo 
»0»andthemountainesofG4/Won theEaft, and Ierdanon the Weft .-of whom Og 
(King of Bafan) and Sihon (ouerthrowne by Mofes) were Princes. 

The ^Amontes had alio many other habitations difperfed within the boundes of 
Canaan: as behind Ltbanus in the edge of Cs-k/yria, or Syria libanica. They had alfo 

their 



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their being in the mountaines of Iuda , and in idumxa neere the Metropolis thereof, "Otm.i. 
called Duma. And hereofit came that all the Canaanites were fbmetime called Amo- N,m - 1 i- 
rtf«:asin Genefstht h~(teenth,forthewickednefeef the Amortiests not yet fu/l And that 
this was alfo a powcrfull Nation, wcefinde in the Prophet Amos ; TetdeHroied I AmnX 
the Amonte before them, whofe heighth was like the heighth of a C&dar ,andhe was (Iron? 
as the Oakes. 



10 



t. IHL 

Of the Gergefites, Heuites andHarkites. 



'T'He fiftfonneof Canaan was Gergefeusox Gergefon, (othcrwifc Girgdf) whoin- 
-*■ habited on the Eaft fide of the lake of Tiberias, or the Sea of Galilee, where 
Ptolomie fets the C'm'icGerafa, which lofephus calles Gefera in the territorie of De- 
capolis. Here it was that c/;>t/? difpoiTeft the pofTefTed with Diuels; and the G^*?- 
///to delircd him to depart their coaftes : becaufe their /wine filled with theeuill /pi- 
nts drowned themfelues in the Seaof Galilee. Gergefeus alfo built Berytus (fomc- 
time Geris) afterward Falix Julia, three miles from the riuer ^Adonis in Phoenicia : 
in which the Romanes held a garri/bn : and to which ^Auguflus gaue manie large 

20 priuiledges. 

Heucus the fixth fonlie ; and Father of the Heuites ; inhabited vnder Libanus 
neere Emath. Thefc Heuites , howfoeuerthe Caphthorim expelled a good part of 
them (asinltotfrnw^wthefecond is remembred) yet many of them remained 
all the warre oflofua, and afterward to the time of Salomon. For God was not 
pleafed vtterly to roote out thefe Nations , but they were fometimes made Tribu- 
taries to the ifraelites, and at other times ferued (in their falling aWay from the true 
worfhip of God) to arfM them i for as it is written Iudges the third ; They remained 
to proue Israel by them,whether they would obay the Commandements of God. 
Theleuenthibnnewaso^cmr or Harki, who betweehe the foote of Libanus 

% o and the Mediterran Sea, (ouer againft Tripolis) built the Cittie of LArchas, ^Arce, of. 
Area, afterwards Arachis. 



\- V. 

of Sini and ^Aruddi, 

O I n e v s the eighth Sonne" Hierofolymitams fets at Caparorfa , which Ptolomie finds 
lJ in iiuUa not firre from Iebus ; to the South thereof, faith Junius. But it is more 
probable.that Sineus founded Sin, which S. Hieromecah Sim ; Ptolomie Simyra : Me~ 
40 la and Plinie Simyrus : Brochard Sycon, (called Synochis) neare Aria. Pererius thinkes 
that Sineus inhabited the Deferts of Sinai or thereabout ; but hereof there is no o- 
thcr certaintie then the report of Brochard, who tooke vew of all thefe places , afEr- 
mingthat Sineus built Synochis,asZidonbui\tZid0ii. There is alfo another Nation 
ofcVw (written with the letter C. otherwife Rend) who defcended of Hobab the 
Sonne of Raguel the Mddianite, who affifted the ifraelites in their conduction through 
the wilderneiTe of Pharan. But thefe Cind were admitted among the ifraelites, 
and had a portion of Land with the Nephtalms, befidc their habitations with the 
Amalekites : againft thefe Cind Balaam prophecied, that they fhould be deftroyed by 
the t^A(Jyrians. 

The ninth Sonne wis. Aradeus or Aruddeus, who in the Ifle of Aradusbmltthc 
Cittie Arados: oppofite againft which Iflandonthcmaine of Phcenicia, they foun- 
ded another Cittie of that name , which for oppofition was afterwards called Anta- 
radus. To this Cittie came S.Peter (faith Clement) and in this Ifle preached the Go- 
ipell : and founded a Church in honour of our Ladie : but wee finde no fuch worke 

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of his in the Acts of the Apoftlcs. Both thcie two were very famous : and places of 
skilfull Sea-men : whom Ezechiel remembreth in his prophecies againft the Tyrians. 
The inhabitants ofZidon and <^Armdwere thy Mamners. 



f. VI. 

Vf ZeM AM. 

iT\ F Samarens, or Ztmari, the tenth Sonne, there are diuers opinions. Some 
V- 7 thinkethathc firft inhabited in Calefyna at Edejfa, and founded Samardm, 10 
which in Iofua is placed in the Tribe ofBeniamm. There is alio Samaraijm ( of the 
Tsmd.mcbrcn. fimc Orthographic) vponthemountainesof Ephratm (faith Beroddus) mentioned 
»-4. in the fecond of Chronicles c. 1 3 .v.4. which the Latineconucrtcth amiffe (faith hee) 

by Semeron. The Hierofolymitan Paraphraft makes Samarcm ( of whom were the 

/ , mfti/to;theparentofthe£w^/>hichP/wfcalstheJ*w^w,inCa'Mr M 5and 
it maybe that it was their firft habitation,and that they afterwards inhabited thofc 
other places before rcmembred. But that they founded J#«»w,both the Hebrcw 
Orthographie.andthisplaceinthefirft of Kings (/peaking of Omri) difproueth. 
t.Kji'iiit.^. Jtndhc bought themoimtaine Samarkor Shemeron of one She ji eh , for two talents of 

fduer,andbuiltinthemountaine:andcalkdthenameoftheCittiewhichhebuilt,afterth<Lj ^0 
name of S h e m e a. , Lord of the mountaine Samaria. But of all the/e places I fhall 

fpeakemoreatlargeintheconqueftofthcholyLand.bythechildrenof^-W.Of 
whomfoeucr the Samantanes wcredefcended, / urc Lam, thatrhey were eucr a perfi- 

tt IL ■ d,ous Nation ' and ^ : foras lon S as *eftate of the/rawftood vp , thcyalwaies 

- P** called them/el ues Iewes.- when it fuffercd or finke, they then vtterly denyed to be of 

that Nation or Familie ; for at fuchtimeas they wercreturned from their firft cap- 

tiuitie, they became a mixt Nation; partly of the Colonies o£ the Affrrians-, and 

partly of the naturals. 



rrf 



H4*4 



t. VII. ** 

Of H A M A T H I. 

HTHelaftof Canaans Somes was Hamatheus , or (according to the Hebrew) Ht- 
*■ mothi, of Htmath: (faith Beroddm) of which ( the afpiration taken away ) the 
lame is pronounced Bw«/A,whereof Hamatheus was parent, Iefephus and SKHierome 
confound Emath with ^Intwch, not that Antioch which fhndeth on the Riuer o- 
rontes, on the frontier of Ccmagena, betweene the mountaine Cafiw and the Pro- 
uince ofPJeria, and Selcncit, of which S. Peter wis Bifhop, and in which S. Zukeznd 
Aftrr- Ignatius v/ercbornc : but antioch, furnamed Epiphama, as Beroddm fuppofeth, Ar> 
which ftandeth betweene Apamea and Emefa in CaftotU. Yet,indeede,£»w/Acan' 
not be taken for either : for both that Antioch vpoiWrontes , and that which neigh- 
hourcth Emefa, are farther off fcated from Canaan., then eucr any of thofc Nations 
ftraglcd. And whereas S.Hierome fcttcth Emath, which hee confoundeth with E- 
piphani^inthcTribeofT^ephtdii itismanifeft, that Epiphania, which ftandeth to 
the North of Emefa,haih all the Prouince of Laodicea , betweene it and any part of 
the land diuided. Andif Ltbanm it felfe were not fhared among the Tribes, then 
could not Epiphania belong vnto them : for both the Prouinces Laodicea and hbam- 
wbetwceneEpiphamaind any part of the holy Land . and therefore Emotbfo 
taken could not be apart of Mphtdi, asm the thirteenth of lafm isdirectly proucd <o 
For /^counting the lands that remained vnpofTeft, reckoneth all mount Libamn 
towards the Sunnc-nfing, from Badgadmdet mount Herman, vatill we comcto Ha- 
math. And trm reafon (among others) is vfed, that Emath was not in NephtaUm, or 
any way belongmgtothechilcfren of 7/ W /;becauf e i? rf «;^cceptcd theprefentsof 

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TobuKing oiEmath, and (therewithall) conditions of peace : which hee would not 
hauc done, if that Territorie had cuer belonged to the children of jfrael,but would 
hauerecouered it without compofition, and by ftrong hand, as he did the reft. But 
this Argument (asltakeit) hath no great waight. For if the promife which God 
made be confidered, as it is written in Deutcronomie, then might Emtth bee compre- cm. 0.14s 
hended, though feated altogether without the bounds of the Land promifed , ac- 
cording to the defcription of Mofes and Iofu a : for Emotb is indeedeiituateon the o- 
ther fide of themountaineof /Atotmz , which ioyneth to Libamu .-and is otherwifc 
called Iturea. But whereas Homothis named mlofua the 19.^.3 5. and written in the 
10 Latine conuerfion &«<tf^, therein (faith BeroaldusJ was S.HicromemirXaken. Emath 
or Iturea is that Ouer the mountaines, and the Citric in Nephtdim fhould bee written 
Hamath : and Co the Septuagint (vnderftanding the difference) write it Ammath and 
not Emath, the lame which indeede belonged to the 'jyephtalims, (catcd on the fbuth 
fide of Libanus, to the Eaftof Ajfedim : which Cittie S. Hieremev/ritcs Emath , iofr- 
phus Hamath , others Emathin, or Amatheos, and the people Amathe'm^ of which 
(asltakeit) Rabfakeh vauntethinthefecondofA'w^. where is the God ' of Hamath. c.i$.&in: 



20 



\. XIII. 

of the Sonnes of Ciivsh (excepting Nimhod) of whom hereafter. 



The fonftes of chuf were, 



T Seba*, 
j Hmila, 
J Sabta, 
j Raama, 
I Sabteca, 
(_ T^imrod. 



tsheba, 
Andthcfbnncsofita>»<*were,< and 

C Dedan. 



30 




t- I- 

That the most of the Sonnes ofCuvsH were feated in Arabia the Happies : 

and of the Sabjians that robbed I o b ; and of the Queenes 

that came to Salomon. 

Eb a of Saba was the eld eft Sonne of chufl, the eldeft Sonne ofHam'^ 
to make a difference betweene him and his Nephew Sheba, the Sonne 
ofhis brother Raama, or Regma (or Ragma after Montanus) hisname 
' is written with a fingle (S) Samecb, and Sbeba the Sonne of ' Regrm 
40 V"3V^% with an fSJ afpirate, which is the Hebrew Scbin. Seba the eldeft fonne* 
of chufi, Regma his brother, and J«<* the fbnnc of J^^poffeft both the Chores 
of Arabia Fwltx. Saba tooke that part toward the Red Sea, as neareft his Fathef 
Chufi, and the land of the Cbuftes: Begma and Sheba the Eaft coaft of the fame Ara, 
bu which looketh into the Gulfe of Perfia; of which Ptimef>. Sabdi^Arabumpopuli 
propter t/mraclarifimiadvtra£ mariaporreclis gentibus habitant , The Sabxans people of 
Arabia, famous for their Frankincenfe, extending their Nations dwell along both the Seas 
(to wit) the Perfan, and the Arabian, or Red Sea. T his Countrie was afterwards cal- 
led Arabia, a populi mixtione, faith Poftelks. To this agreeth Ptolomie, who fetteth 
the Cittie of Saba towards the Arabian Or Red Sea, and the Cittie Rhegama towards 
50 the Per fan , with whom alfo wee may \caue Sabta: for fo much Montanus gathcreth 
outof P/tfW>,becaurehcremcmbrethaNation (called Stabri) nearc the Perfan 
Sea ; and Mafabathn which delcended of them . F ut Montanus hath lent Regma , or 
(as he cals him Rahma) into Carmania. for which I fee no reafon. Iofephm , who on- 
ly attended his o wne fancies, hath banifhed Sab 1 of Seba to the border orthopia. 

But 



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The fir ft < Boo\e of the fir ft part Ch a p .8 .§• » ?«| •*• 



But Bcroddus thinks it ftrange, that the Sabd ,■ which ftole away lobs Cattle , Ihould 
■runne through all tAgypt and all Arabia Petraa, and finde out /^ in Traccmtishc- 
twecne Pdkjtma and Ctelefyria 1 100. miles off. Now as this conjecture was more 
then ridiculous, fo doe I thinke, that neither the Sabd on the Red Sea, ncrthofe to- 
ward the Perfian Sea.could by any mcanes execute the Health vpon lob, which ibc- 
uer Beroaldus fhall take for neareft. But thefe were the Sabd of ^Arabia the Defert, 
where Guilandimts Mekhior affirmeth out of his owne experience, that the Cittie Sa- 
ba is featcd : the lame which Ptolomie als Saue , now Semifcafac : and from this Saba 
< in Arabia the Defert , came thole cMagi or Wifemcn which worihipped Christ , faith 



O £i7 ) 



S3- 



Flil.tai6.AJu. 
E%ecb.1j.1z. 



<JMelchior, whole werdes are thefe. The CUagi came neither out oj '- Mefepotamia (as jo 
chryfojlome, llterome, and A?nbrofe fuppofed) nor out of Arabia the Happies , as m.<my 
wife men doe beleette, but out of Saba in Arabia the Defert : which Cittie when my felfe was 
there was (as Tiudgedit) called Semifcafac. And to approue this opinion of Guilmdinus 
it appearcth that thelbshabai were neighbours to lob , and lay fit to inuadeand rob 
him. For both the other Nations (afwell thofc on the Perfian Sea , as thole on the 
Red Sea) are fb difioyned with large Defcrts, as thereis no poffibilrtie for ftrangers 
to pafTe them, efpecially with any numbers of Cattle , Both in refpect of the moun- 
-fennes, of the finds, and of the extreme want of water in thofe parts, vbi nee homines 
nee beJlid videntttr, nee aues, imo nee ar bores, necgermen aliquodfed non mpmontesfaxof, 
altifimi, ajperimi, where there are foundneither men nor beafls, no not fo much as birds, 10 
or trees, nor anypaflure or graft, but only fur pe, and high flonie, and cr aggie mountaines. 
■BrroaldusShd Pererius concciuc , that the Queene of Saba which came to vifite Salo- 
mon, was oithcSab.uon the Eaft fide of Arabia Ftelix ; but the contrarie leemeth 
more probable, and that fhee was Queene of Saba towards the Red lea : for Salomon 
at that time commanding all that part of Arabia Peiraa, twixt idum&a and the Red 
Sea, as farre downe as LMtiian or Madian, and Ezion Gaber : and this Queene of Saba 
which inhabited the Weft part of Arabia Fteltx, being his neighbour,might without 
any farre trauaileentcr his Territories, free from all danger of furprile by any other 
Prince or Nation. 

1 But to auoide tedioufncfTe, it is manifeft that Seba or Saba, Sabta,Raama,ox Regma, 50 
with h is Sonnes she ba and Be dan, and Sabteca , were all the poffeffours of Arabia the 
Happie and the Defert : only Hauilah and "uSlfmrod dwelt together on the Eaft fide «f 
chufli, who held Arabia Pctr&a. Now for Sabta , there is found of his name the 
Cittie of Sabbatha er Sabota in the fame Arabia: of which both Plinie and Ptolomie_j; 
who withall nameth Sabotale,\vkhm the wals whereof there were lometimes found 
fixtie Temples. Ezecbiel ioyneth the Father and the Sonne together , The 'JMer- 
thants of'Shehaand Raama were thy Merchants. And that they were the Eafterne ^4- 
rabians their merchandife witnefTeth, formerly repeated in the Chapter of Paradife. 
For lofephus his fancies, that Saba was the parent of the lAzthiopians about CWeroe, k 
and Sabta of the Ethiopians Ajlabari,thcy be not worthie any farther anfwerc then aq 
hath already beene giuen : efpecially feeing thefe Citties preieruing the memoric of 
the names of Saba and of ' Sabta in Arabia were yet remaining in Ptolomies time, though 
in Ibme letters changed. As alfo in the coafts adioyning, the names of other of the 
brethrenofthcfamilieofc«/X, with little alterations are prcferued. In ^Arabiathe 
Defert is found the Cittie Saba or Saue, (now Semifcafac) with the Cittie of Rhegana 
for P.hegma; and the Nation by Ptolomie hixnfdf'c called Raabeni ofRaamah. In A- 
rabii the Happie is found the Cittie of Shegama, and Rabana, which alio keepeth the 
found of Rhegmafhe. Citie of Sap tha or S,iptah,not fir from the Eaft coaft of Arabia: 
as alio the Metropolis and chicle citie,in the body of the South part of Arabia,c.\\\ed 
without difference or alteration Sabatha ; and to the Weft of Sabathatbwavdsthc 
Red Sea the great Citie of Saba ; and the Nation adioyning, Sabd : and to the fbuth 
thereof againe toward the ftreight entrance of the Red Sea, the Region of Sabe, To 
all thefe his Brothers and Nephewes which were leatcd on the Eaft fide of Arabia, 
Hauilah by the pafliige of Tigris was a neighbour, to whom he mightpaffe by boatc 

euen 



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C h a p. 8. ^.^.f .2 . o/t/?^ Htfioric of the World. 

eucn vnto Rhegma, the Cittieof Raama,ox Rhegmafit neare the Riuc-r of Z.w towards 
the mouth of the Perfian Sea, which flood in Ptolomies time. 



[67 



t. II. 



JosEHivsfc opmm «/Dedsn, oneof the Jfite of -Chvsh to haueieene feated 

in the Weft Ethiopia, dijproucd out of Ezec u : 



aud H 1 £ a. e m 1 E . 



10 A Nd whereas Ipfephns (whominthis SLHktsme. follow 
■^"•Vn J lent Z)«io* the lonne of Raamah into W«ft«iA( 



feth, as not c urious here- 
<j/m, itisftrangethat Ese- 



z.to (hould couple jW*, Raamah, and i)«fe together ; Z><?rfk» in the x 5 . verfe, and 
J/W,* and Raamah in the aa.verles to be the merchants of TyrejS Dedan had dwelt in 
Weft ty£7/;w/>«,which is diftant from Raamah and S&ebafths habitation of his father 
and brother) aboue 4ooo.milcs. Befidcs which the Marchandife that the Dedanites 
brought to Tyre&oih not make them naked Black-mores. For they of Dedan (faith 
Eaechiel) were thy merchants in pretiousj:lothcs_forthy charriots ; and thefe We- 
fternc Ethiopians neuer law cloth, till the Fortngals fecking thole Goalies traded 
■ with them : the merchandife of the Countrie beeing Hides, Elephants teeth, fome 

20 Gold and Amber, Ciuctcattes, and Rice, but nothing at all of any manufacture; 
and all thefe they exchanged for linnen, or iron checfiy. 

But in thofe daies the Weft part of Africa within the body of the land was known 
onely by imagination : and,beeingvndcrthe burnt Zone was held vninhabitable. 
And therefore that the Negrosoi the Weft Etbiepu, which inhabitc about Sara 
liona, or Niger, could cither pafle by Sea or Land to Tyre in the bottome of the Mc- 
diterran Sea, were a ftrangc, or rather a foolifh fancie . Now to put it out of dilpute 
that Dedan alio dwelt by the reft of the children of c/>«/Z>,which feates they held by 
that name in the time of Hicremic the Prophet let vs heare Hieremic his own words. 
Flie yee inhabitants of Dedan , for I hate brought, the deflruciicnofrEs Ay zipon him. 

30 Heercby it appearcth that Dedan was a neighbour to the I&mteans : zxvildumcea is 
a Prouincc of Arabia Pctr&a : and Dedan which d wel t on th e North part of Arabia 
iWzA-,ioyncd in that part to PetrM,thelcat of his Grand-father chu/b; which neigh- 
bor-hood and fellowihip of Dedan and the idumwansls alfb confirmed by Ezcctrie!. Exethxajj, 
Irtillfiretch out mine handvfon Sdom,and defray Man andBcajt oat of it, and I will make v " ■ ' s • 
// deflate from Teman : and they of Dedan foallfllby thejword. 



$. xi hi. 

oftheijfuc ofM r z a. a i m .- and of the place of. Hies.ehie Chap. 
4o 9 . Verfi y. ' 

Fter chfrbit fblloweth tofpeake of Mar ami fonncs, whole names 
(faith Saint Augufme) wereplurall, to fignifie the Nations, which 
1 camcof thcm.Ludim the eldeft fonne ofMizraim. was the father of the 
, Lybians in Africa : and the reft of his brothers difperfid themfelues in- 
to all Regions adioyning. Among the formes of shem there is alio 
Lud; but he is differenced from Lud the fonne oi'Maraim by the lingular number ■ 
thcfbnneof S&ro beeing written iW, thefonneof MaraimLttdin : and yet thele 
names and nations are often confounded, notwithstanding the apparent difference 
jo bothof names and nations. ForJtbatiWwthVfonn? of Maraim was the parent of 
the Lybians in Africa, and that hee was fcated not farre from Uitiararm his father, ip- 
peareth by the Prophet Hiercmie, who ioyneth them in this fort together. Come vp 
ye Horfcs, and rage ye charr'wts, and let the valiant men come forth, the Slack-moor cs and 
the Lybians which bearc the field : for thole Nations afiifted the Egyptians beeing of 

one 




The termina- 
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The fir Jl 'Booke'of 'the firfi part Chap. 



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10 



oneparentdefcendcd. And m Ezeehiel, Phut and iW^reioynedtogeather. Ethi- 
opia (or Chufh) CmhEx.ee/jid c. 30. v. 3. ^W P h v t and L v d , andallthe common 
people,andtbemenoftbelandthatareinleaguejjMllfallwiththemby tie fit or d : which 
isasmuchtofay,as'thefbniu\sofc/;/.y£; (which were the chufttes) the Sonnesof 
Mtzmm, (which Were the Egyptians) and the Lybiatis, (defcendedof'hisfonne 
Ltd) with other the inhabitants ot Egypt and o^?rca fhall fall together. Hierofoly- 
mitanns finds alio in ^/foczaNation of'the Lydians. And I beleeue it : becaufe Hiere- 
mie ioyneth the Lybians and Lydians together in the place before rcmembrcd. But 
Lybia in Africa is by the Hebrew called Ludim (faith Arias xMontanus ) though 1. 
■chron. 1 2. ■$. they tecmetobe called Zubim or Zubxi, a name fbmewhat nearer the 
word LyUeSySnd by which it may fecme that the truer writing is, not Zibyes,butZy- 
bies. Neither is it here to be omitted, that Pint us (vpon the thirtieth of Ezcchid) 
vndcrftandeth that which is fpoken in the third Verfe of Ztd,not to be meant of the 
Libyans at all : for he will haue this threatning to be meant agamft the people of Ly- 
da,a Cittie (faith he) betwecne «/££#>/ and PaUfiina,which opinion I could notmif- 
likeiftheCittieofX^werefbfeatcd. But Zy da (which ftiould be written Zydd/t 
with a double D, and is the fame Cittie which was afterward Dio/polis, in which 
S. Peter cured Eneas of the palfey) ftandeth neare the Torrent G*#.,not farre from 
Joppc the Port oi'Hierufdem. Yet it is not impoffible but that this Cittie might haue 
Ltd for the Founder. For there are many Citties of one name founded in all the 20 
Regions ofthe world, and farre afunder ; as after the names o{'^4lexander,Sdeuctts, 
and Antiochus, many Citties called Alexandria, Seleucia, and Antiochm , foofdiuers 
others. S. HieromemakethZehabim to bee the Father of Libya who was the third 
•fbnne of Mi&raim : and fo doth Poltellus ; and either opinion may be true. 

The reft of Msra»«Sonneshaueno proper Countries giuen them in the Scrip- 
turesfimmgCa/Iuhim and Caphtorim, ofwhom came the Phtlifiims, whom the Scrip- 
tures call Pelefet. 

Thcfe Caphim inhabited Cafiiotis, a region lying in the entrance oC Egypt from 
PaUftinajxi which the Lake sirbonk and the mountaine Cafim are found : not farre 
from whence Pompey was buried. 

Caphtorim feated neare Caphim in that Tra£l 0? Egypt called Sethroil % ,not farre 
from Pelufium. Strabo cals it Sethroitis ; Stephanas and PlinieSethroites, of'the Cittie 
Selhron: which Ortdius takes to bee the fame which Ptolomie cals Hercules parua. Of 
the Caphim and Caphtorim came the Philtjlims , which are call ed by the Septuagint 
i_Allopbylt {whkhis) Altemgenafirangers, orof a ftrange kindred. Thefe Philiftims 
inhabited the South part of'the holy Land towards Egypt, of whom PaUftina 
tookename. FortheHcbrewes (faith ifidore) doe not vfe the letter (Pjbutinftcad 
of it (ph.) Their principall Citties were Gaza, ^Afialon, Az»tus,Geth,and Accaron : 
and the people of them called Gafii,^J/caloniU , A&otij, Geth&i, and ^yfecaroniu. 
jfidereaSrmes that x^Afcalon was firft called Philifiim-. and of that Cittie the Coun- 
trie adioyning. But where ijidore had it, I know not. 

The firft knowne Kingof the Philifiims was that Abimelech, who had alikingto 

Abrahams wife 5 with whom ^Abraham made a couenant and league. This \^ibime* 

lech dwelt indcede at this time in Gerar ; but it is written that hee was alfo King of 

the Philifiims, in thefe wordes. wherefore ifaac went to Abimelech King ofthe Phili- 

tafii vpon (he films vnto Gerar. Now in regard that this orfbme ancienter Abimelech governed the 

2 2.L iaJme. rr>mmnnu^ilfli nt*i=»it-KFtv"^ J-iic nl /-vt-im t-Uo cad r^Cts', „ C JTL-. II _ J *.£ _^__ P. 1 . _ 1 _^ 



3® 



4° 



>n commonwealth greatly to his gloric, the reft of hisjucceflburs called themfelues by 



a 



\ecbiel. 



the»».ei s- the fame narne. The PM//W commanded that Tra&of land vponthe Mediter- 
ran Sea to the Northward, from the Caftle of Pilgrims (otherwife Cafarea PalsftiM 
or Turr is Straton'ms) which was the fouth border of Phcenicia, to Gafaor to the Ri- 
uero?Egypt. The ^/wfew or ftrong Giants were of thefe Philifiims 1 and Golith 
was of Geth one ofthe flue Citties aboue named. They had fometimes flue Kings, 
faith Ziranns. They mattered the^<?/;'toatfeuerall times aboue 1 50. yeares, and 
jcept them Tributaries, till they were weakened by Sampfon and Samuel, but 



5 s 



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llife B 



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C h a p . 8 .5*. 1 5 . f . i . of the Hifiorie of the World. 




10 



in the end this yoke was taken off by David, and layed on themfeiues. 
It is obieclcd , thatbecaufe thefe Citties and the Countries adioyning were heid 
by the fbnnes of kM&raiw , therefore did the ifraeHtes difpoffeiic the fbnnes of 
Mi&raim, and not of Canaan, by forcing thofe places. 

To this faith Permm % that although the Pakflincs or Philijlimshcld it in the time 
oS-Jiftnty yetatthetimeofthepromife it was polteft by the Canaanites ; as in the fe- 
cond of Deatcronome . The Hemtes dwelt in the Villages vnto Gaza. And what 
meruaile if (the Canaanites being the greater part) the denomination were from 
them ? For that the Philiftim were of Caphtor, and fo.of Mi&raim and not of Canaan, 
befidesMofestheVxoyhetHieremic wirncfleth. The Lord mlldeftroy the Philistims, jjtak&i, 
the remnant of the iffueof Caphtor : andinhkemannetin the ninth of Amos, the Phi- 
lifttms are faid to be the relicjues of Caphtorim 5 hone not I brought vp I s r. a e l out te,)4; 
ofthelandof^£gypt, and the Philiftims from Caphtor, and A&AMjrw A"/r . ? fo I 
reade this place with diucrs of the learned. For whereas the rulgar hath , & Pdx- 
ftinos de Cappadocia , & Syros de Cyrene, this conuerfion Beroddus condemneth ■ 
where Caphtor is taken for Cappadocia, and Cyrene for Kir. For Cyrene is a Cittic di- 
rectly Weft from i/£gypt, betweene Ptolomais or Barce and ^yipollonia : but Kir in .rf- 
fia vnder the Ajfyrians : Iimius hath it A'»" , and not Cyrene : and Co hath the Geneua. 
But Pererint cals Caphtorirn Cappadocia according to the^/j^r tranflation, to which 

20 he is bound :and yet it is not altogether improbable if he mcancCappadociain Pd*~ 

Jlina, and not that Cappadociaby the Sea Pont&s in theNorth of ^Afiathelcife. For or wtiich Tee 
whether they inhabited Sethreites, or Cappadocia of Palx'stina , it is not certainly in tlle 'e™nd 
knowne. Andfurein this manner hee may expound Cappadocia to bee ambiguous, jj ookc - cha P-7- 
aswellashcdothC/rwf.-takingitherenotforQrcwin Africa, butfbr a place in ^' ■*' 
CMedia. For it is written in the fecond of Kings, that TeglatphaLjjerKmg of the Af- c.ie. v.g. 
fyrians carryed away the inhabitants of Damafcm into Kir : and fo Jo fephus feetnes 
tovnderftandthisA'/r, for Cyrent-j'vn. CMedia, calling this Cyww iMedu fuperior : 
forit was the manner and pollicie of the Ajfyrians to tranfplarit the peopleconque- 
red by them, as they did the Samarians or Israelites, and oth'eTNatlbns. And hereof 

30 it carric'thatA'/r was called Syro-media : becaufe the Syrians by the Ajfyrians were 
therein captiucd. 



$. XV. 

Of the ijfue of S e m. 



40 



t- I- 
Of El\m, Assvr, Arphaxad, and Ltd. 

It reinaineth laftly to fpeakeofthe Sonnes of Sem i who were thefe: 



i. 

a. 

3- 
4- 
J- 



Alam, or Elam. 
\^4flmr. 
Arphaxad. 
Lud, and 
i^Aram. 



rfft 



tfSpfS^S* He pofteritie of Sent Mofs recounteth after the reft : becaufe ffdni 
) them hee proceedeth in order with the Genealogie and ftorie of the 
Hebrewes. For of Semwas Abraham defcended. 

Of thefe fiue Sonnes the Scriptures remember the length of the 

life of ArphaxadonXy ,and only the children of him and Aram, the reft 

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are barely f 'poken of by rehearfall of their names, fauing that it may be gathered, 
that Afar (who was fuppofed to found Nimueh) was alfb laid to be the Father of 
the Ajfyrians, whofe iflues , and the iffues of Cham inftantly contended for the Em- 
pire of the Eaft : which fbmetimes the Afyrians , fbmetimes the Babylonians obtay- 
•p.ed, according to the vertuc of their Princes. T his is the common opinion, which 
alfo teacheth vs, that all the Eaft parts of the world were peopled by Afur, Elam, 
and -£«^,(fauing W/^which Ibeleeue AWyhimfelfefirftinhahited:and to whom 
Ophir and Hamlah the formes oiloctan afterward repaired. Hij filij Ssuab Euphraic 
fiimio partem ylfuvfjue ad Oceanian Indicant tenner unt , Thefe fonnes of S e m (faith 
S. Hikome) held all thofe Regions from Euphrates to the Indian Ocean. l Q 

iofepbM.t.i.c-7 Of Elam came the Elamites, remembrcd Acts the 2 . v. the p. and the Princes of 
Perfa ; which name then beganne to bee out of vfe and loft , when the Perfians be- 
came Mafters ofBabyloriia : the Eaft Monarchic being eftablifhed in them . Some pro- 
phane writers diftinguifh Elam from Perfa, and make th e Elamites a people apart.Bur 
Suft (which the Scriptures call Sufan) in Elam was the Kings feat of Perfa (witnefTe 
c.t.v.%. Daniel.) And Jfaw (faith he) in a vifon,andwhen 1 favp it 1 was in the Pa/luce ofS v- 

Vtol.Afia.tah.i- s A N ' w ^ c ^ IS m the Province of Elam. This Cittic is embraced bytheRiucr £»/.«# 
vmt.s.i. (according to Ptolomie) in Daniel,Vlai: and feated in the border oi'Sufana. 

Ajhur (as moftHiftorians beleeue) thefecondfbnne of Scm, was Father of the 
i^yijfyrians, who difdayning the pride of "Nimrod, parted from Babel, and built Ni- 10 
nine, of equall beautie and magnitude with Babylon, or exceeding it. But we fhall in 
due place difprouc that opinion. Eue ry mans hand hath beene in this Storie^and 
fj I t herefore I fhall not nccde herein to fpcake much ■ for the AffyrJansWoften inua- 
ded and fpoiled the ifraelites , deftroyed their Citties, and led them Captiucs, as 
both in Diuine and Humane letters there is large and often mention of this nation. 
But howfoeuer Herodotus and D.Siculm extend this Empire, and honourthis na- 
tion with ample Dominion;yet was not the ftate ofthe Afyrians ofanyfuch power, 
after fuch time.as Sardanapalus loft the Empire. For Senacherib who was one of the 
powcrfulleft Princes among them , had yet themountaine7d»m>' forthevtmoftof 
hisDominion toward the North-caft, and Syria bounded him toward the Weft, 5 
riu notwithftandingthofevauntsofi'w^»v^in^7the37. Haue the Gods of the Na- 

tions deliueredthem whom my Bathers haue deftroyed ? as G o z a n , and H a r a n , and 
R e s e p h , md the children j/Eden which were at Telaffar. Where is the King of 
Hamath, and the Kingof ' Arphad,andthe King oftheCittie Sepharuaim , Henaandluah ? 
All thefe were indecde but pettie Kings of Citties, and fmall Countries ; as Huron in 
CWefopotamia : Refeph'm Palmyrena : Hamath or Emath In Itur,ed\x\&er Libanus : the 
Jfle of Eden : Sepher , and others of this fort. Yea Nahuchodonofor , who was moft 
powerfull, before the concjueft of<s£gypt had but chaldtea, CAiefopotamia, and Syria, 
with Palaftina and Phoenicia parts thereof But in this qucftion of Affur,\ will fpeake 
my opinion freely when I come to Nimrod, whofe plantation I haue omitted a- 4.0 
mong the reft ofthe Chuftes, becaufe hee eftablifhed the firft Empire : from whom 
the moft memorableftorieofthe world taketh beginning. 

OfArphaxadcame theChaldxans , faith S.Hierome , and Iofephus , butit muft bee 
thofe chaldiansabout Vr : for the fonnes of Cham pofTeft the reft. ly s true that hee 
wasthe Father ofthe Hebrewes : for Arphaxad begat shela, and Shela Heber, of 
"whom hereafter. 

And that Lttd the fourth Sonne ofshem, gauenameto the Lydians in Afia the 
lefTe, is the common opinion, taken from lofephm and S.Hierome; butlfeenotby 
what reafon he was moued to ftraggle thither from his friends. 



jo 



f. II. 




5& 



fifi 

"■to* [lii 

7 C( Sh 

sdbii*,, 

"g't. fonlUin 

RnS 
I dxm Qpr/ucs, as 
irion of this nation, 
and honour this na- 

u : power, 

KOftfac 

, | rivtmoftol 
mtoward the Welt, p 
'aiikGiistftlitlit- 

'uiirtii Am 

w 



:. I . 



;/»■/" 



own*;*** 81 

„«**'** ■'*!; 

( - ff w ho was molt 



y 



tryv r 



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flv^f-rLrlXT^^ 



171 



Chap.S.^.I)"-!^. oftbeHifiorieoftbe World. 

t. 11. 

ofAiAM, <W fe Sonnes. 

AR a m the fife and laft Sonne of S^«» was the parent of the Syrians : of which 
Pamafcus was head. Their name was changed from Aram or Aramites by Sy* efay.i.v.s. 
■ rus ( faith EuJebiM out of Jofefhus) which S7/W lined before ^Mofes was borne j the E*feb.p.io& 
fame which others call the fonne of Apollo. tMefopotamia alio being but a Prouince 
of Syria, had the name of Aram Maharaijm , which is as much to fay , as Syria duorum 
1 o fiumorum, Syria ccmpaffedwithtwo Riuers : (to wit) Tigris and Euphrates. The Scrip- 
tures cadi it 'JMefopotamia , Syria , and Padan Aram .■ and the Greekes LMefepetami* 
limply. 

Anfe ar.i get thee to Padaft Aram (faith ifactc to Jacob) tothehoufeef&nnvii. gck.jS j. See 
thy mothers father i and thence take thee a wife. S/7<i^alfbremembreth it by the ancient Gcs.ij.io.AIfe 
name of ifAram or Aramea, as thefe his owne wordes conuerted witneffe. Quos nos ® e "' sr - l l-*- 
Syros vocamusfpfi Syri Aramenios0"Arameosvocmt,Thofewhich we call Syrians (laith P»*Uw. 
he) thetafelues call Aramenians and Arameans. p f llm w. 

Againft this opinion that Aram the fbnne 0? Sem, was the Father and Denomi- S>r " '' '*' 
natorofthcS/rawingenerall; (and not only of thofe in Syria Jnter-amm , wliich 
20 is Mcfopotarma) fome reade Gen. 22.21. JCemuei, the father of the Syrians ; where o- 
thcroutoftheoriginallreade/v^wW.the Conneoi'Aram. Neitheris itany inconue- 
nience for vs to vnderftand the word (Aram) here , not for the Nation , but for the 
name ofifbme one of note*; the rather, becaufein thcHiftorie of Abraham and J- 
frnc (which was in timelong before Kemuels pofteritie could bee film ous) wee iinde 
Mefopoiamia called Aram ; and that with an addition : fbmctimes with Naharaijm y 
andfometimesofiW<w7, to diftinguifh it from another Aram, which (asitfeemes) 
then alio was called Aram. For whereas Junius thinks in his note vpon Gen. 25.20. 
thatPAs^^vtwoughttobereftrainedto fbme parr of Mefopotamia, (to wit) to 
that part which Ptolomiecah Ancobaritis (fo called from the Riuer Chaboras, which 
30 diuidingitrunnethinto£«/>^«Jthepromifcuous vie of Padan Aram, and Aram 
Naharafm (which latter appellation cjueftionlefTe comprehends the whole Mefopo- 
iamia) may feeme to refute this opinion : cfpecially feeing the fignification of this 
. appellation agrceth with the whole Region. For it fignifieth as muchastheyoke 
oi' Syria, which nameagrecs with this Region : became the two Riuers (as it were) 
yoked together goe along if. The reliques of the name Padan appeare in the name 
of twoCittiesiniWtfw«', called Aphadana: (as 7«»;whath well noted) theonevp- 
pon chaboras, the other vpon Euphrates. 



4o 



The Sonnes of Aram were, 



" Fz, or JJus, 

I JJul, 

j Gether, and 

_ Mefch or Mes. 



Vz, or JJus inhabited about Damafeus,and built that Cittie,faith Jcfephtisand Saint 
Hierome. But Ttotornifliking this opinion, both in them and in Lyra, whoalfo HUm.htred. 
loilo weth Iofephus, affirmeth that Abrahams Steward Eltezer was the Founder there- Heir " ic - 
of; though it were likely that JJus the eldeft fonne of Aram dwelt neare vntohis fa- 
ther, who inhabited the body of Syria. For Has was a Region of the famc,adioyning 
to Arabia the Defert , and to Batanea or Tracomtis : whereof the Prophet Hieremic^ 
50 Reioyce and be glad O daughter of ' Edom that dwclleji in the land of JJus. Plus therefore Hierm Lm ^ 
is leatcd beyond Jordan, in the Eaft Region ofTraconitu, adioyning to Bafm, hauing M*m. 
Batanea Gaulonttis, and the mountaine Seir to the Eaft, Edrai to the South, Damafcus 
North, and Jordan Weft : hauingin it many Citties and people, as may alfo bee ga- 
thered out of Hieremie : Andall forts of people .• and all the Kings of the land efHus. C x,vm 

Qj> In 




lyi 



The fir ft "Booke ofthe fir fi part C h a K&&IJ A^i 






In this Region dwelt Job, defcendedof /fix, the fbnne of Nahor, the brother of 
Abraham ((aith S z .HiertmeJ and married Vma the daughter of Jacob, faith Fhilo. 

Hid thefecond Sonne of' ^Aram, S. Hierome makes the Father of'the Armenians : 
and Gether the third Sonne, parent to the ^Arcanamansoi •Cartons; which opinion, 
(beatuftlfindcnotwheretofethim) I doe nctdifprouc, though I iecnoreafcn 
why Gether fhould lcaue rhe fellowfbip of his owne brethren, and dwell among 
Grangers in ijrffii the Idle. Junius giues Hid (whom hoc writes chid) the Dclert of 
Pttlmpenaiii farrc as Euphrates, where Ptolomie fettetb the Cittie ofcholle, 

Gether (faith lofephiis) founded the Sacinans i but Jofepht u gaue all Noahs children ** < 
feathers,"to carry them fafre away in all hafte. For mine owne opinion I alwaies 10 
^ : keeps the rule of neighbourhood, and thinkc with Iumiu .- ( to wit ) Til* Gether 
feated himfelfe neare his brothers, in the body of Syria, and in the Prouince of Cafi 
fietis, and Seleiicis, where P/olomtephceth Gmdarus , and the Nation by Plmiecdkd 
Gmdareru. 

Junius alfogiueth to Olfes or Mefih the North part of Syria, berwecneC/fcand 
- Mefopotamia, neare the mountaine Mafiw. The certainty ofthofe plantations can 
no otherwifc be knowne then by this probabilitic, that Aram the F.ither (of whom 
that great Region tooke name) plantedhisfonnesinfhefamelandabouthim : for 
he wanted no fcope of Territorie for himfelfe and them ; neither then when the 
world was newly planted, nor in many hundred yeares after : and therefore there 20 
is no reafbn to caft them into the delert parts of the world, fo farre afunder. And as 
neceffitie and poUicie held them together for a while : fo Ambition ( which began 
together with Angels and Men ) inhabiting the hearts of th'eir children let them a- 
fiindcr. For although thefelbnnesof^r^w,and the fonnes of the reft of Noahs chil- 
dren, kept themfclues within the bounds of fome one large Kingdome ; yet there- 
in euery one alfo fought a Prouince a part, and to themfelues; giuingtotheCitties 
therein built their ownenames, thereby to leaue their memorie to their pofteritie : 
i<f { the vfc of letters being then rare, and knowne to few. 

In this fort did the pride of the Spaniards in America caft them into fo many Pro- ^ 
uinces: euery one emulating and dildayningthcgreatncue of other, as they are 3d 
thereby to this day fubieft to inuafion, expullion, and deftruftion : fo as (A'oua Hi- 
Jpania and Peru excepted , becaufe thofe Countries are vnacceflable to ftrangers) an 
cafie force will caft them out of all the reft. 

UUes the fourth Sonne is made the parent of the Ma-onians : of whom fomcthing 
Chaw 8. 5.7. hath bcene fpoken already. ^frphaxad the third Sonne of S hem, begat shelah, and 
Heber. Heberhad two fonnes,P/;.f/«^< and Jocian : and in Phaleghs time was the earth 
diuided. 



A 



t. in. 

Of the diuifion of the earth in the time of Ph meg, one ofthe Sonnes of 
Heber., ofthe ijjue of S e m. 



4= 



"J" He many people which at thediuifion (at Phaleghs birth) were then liuina,and 
A the through plantation of all the Eaft part of theworld (at his death^hath 
made a doubt, whether the earth were diuided at either. The Hebrewes (faith 
Pererms out ofSe4arHolam,o\\e of their Chronicles) affirme that this partition hap- 
pened at the death of Phaleg-.ind i^.% was- borne in the yeare after the floud toil 
and liued in all 1 3 9. yeares, which numbers added makes'3 40. And therefore was 
kfo many yeares after the floud, ere the children of Njah kuered themfclues. But <o 
to this opinion of the Hebrewes, and the doubtthcymakehowinfofewvearesas 
I o 1 . (the time of Phaleghs birth) fo many people could bcincreafed, Pererms giues 
this anfwer, that if 70. perfons ofthe familieof Jacob increafed to 600000. Renting 
men in a 1 5. yeares , (befides women^hildren, and impotent perfons) how much 

more 



.1:; 



'"■■:->■ . 

?< ■■ 

aicr Cr :" ■' - 




Ha 



Ice 



f« 



re 

'* cI >"'nceofe 

'Wnecfcjjj 
rarionsq, 

K-iandabonthim.-fc 

: and r/ic«/are then i; 

fcrtiiw&cr. Atiix 
'"■dt kgan 
Ictriiflns- / 
:::XiskcM- 

Wome;ycttkc- 
BeGfflB 



• 



. O f«-homfo« to | 



, /;i i#'/ 



32S 



Wiri/ft °J 



b 1 ' 



. - f 






C h a p . 8 .§a$ . f . 3 . of the Hijlorie of the World. 



73 



more is it likely , that fo fooneafterthcfloudthechifdrcnof^c^miohtinaihor- 
ter time bring forth many multitudes, hauing rccciucd the blefling of God. Imreafe 
andmulttfly , and fill the earth ? What ftrength this anfwerc hath , let others judge : 
for the children of ifiael were 70. and had 1 1 ^Tycdfcs time : and the tonnes of 
2fouh were but three, and had but 1 o 1 . yea'resbf rime, to the birth of Phalegh. 

Others conceiuethat Phalegh tooke that name after tbediuifion , in memoric 
thereof : zsttfephits and SKAugufiine, who reafon in this manner. If thediuifion J4p>j.i.Am. 
were at Phaleghs death ( which happened in the yeare , which is commonly held to A,: l- ds <>'"»<>'. 
bethe 48. ox Abraham, but was by more'likely computation n.yearesbeforehis D "- U6 - c - u - 
13 birth) then was the diuifion 38. yearps after Nmus , who gouerned 52. yeares:in 

the 43. yeare of whole raigne Abraham was borne. But when2\(/»**beganneto *>«■«•• <»jGe& 
rule the Ajfyrians 80. yeares before this diuifion (as this diuifion is placed by the '•^• c - 1 °- 
Hcbrewes, Hierome and chryfiBomg) then was the earth lb peopled in all the Eaft 
and Northerne parts, as greater numbers haue not beene found at any time fince. 
For Ninm aflbciating to himfelfe Armas King of Arabia, a people who at that time 
(faith Diod. Skuli/6) plurimum-opibus atquearmis prseflabant, Exceededboth in riches and. 
bodies of men, fubducd many Citties in Armenia 5 rcceiucd Barzanis into grace ; then 
inuaded Media , and crucified Pharnm the King thereof, with his wife and feuen 
children ; vanquifhed all thole Regions betweene2\[jW,nd Tanais,the tAEgyptims^ 
10 Phmkkns, the Kingdomes oi Syria, and all the Nations ofPerfia , to the Hyrimian 
Sea. For the numbers which followed \Njnns ( already remembred out of Ctifias I 
• againU ZeroaBer and others: and Zoroafter on theotherfide, who made refinance 
with fbure hundred thoufand, proue it fufficiently,that if the diuifion had not hap- 
pened before the death of Phaleg, there had needed no diuifion at that time at all, 
For tome ojf them were fo ill fttisfied with their partitions,as they fought to he Ma- 
ftcrsofall 5 and greater Armieswere there neucr gathered thenby 2\g»a&and Semi- 
. ramis : wherefore in this opinion there is little appearance of the truth. 

But for that conceit that if the diuifion had becne madeatthebirthofvA:/^, 
there were not then fufficient numbers borne to fill the earth : It was neuer meant 
30 that the earth could be filled cuery where at the inftant , but by times and degree's: 
And furcly whatfoeuer mens opinions haue beene herein, yet itiscertaine, that 
the diuifion of tongues and of men muft goe neerc together with the ccafineof 
theworkeat 5^/: and that theenterprifeof&*fe/was left off inftantly vpon the 
confulion of languages, where followed the execution of the diuifion ; and fo nei- 
ther at the birth nor death of Phaleg-.ior Phaleg was borne in the yeare 1 01. after 
the floud,which was the yeare that Nmrod came into shinaar,or ro.ycaresafterbe 
arriucd, faith Serofm, 

■ Now if it bee objected thatP&fcgJthe Etymologie of whofename fignifieth 
diuifion mult haue liued without a name, except the name had beenegiuenhim at 
40 the time of this confulion and partition : to this obicftion it may be anfwered.Thac 
thechangcof names vpon diners accidents is not rareinthe Scriptures : for lacob 
was called ifiadaket he had wreftled with the angell ; Abraham was firil Abram ■ 
and Edam Efau ; and that Phaleg being a principall man in this diuifion had his firft 
name vpon this accident changed, it is moft probable. 

And laftly whereas the Hcbrewes S. Hierome and chryfoBeme account Heberm 
great Prophet, if that by giuing his tonne the name of Phaleg, he foretold the diui- 
fion which followed : to this I fay, I doe not finde thatifoWdeferued any fuch ho- 
nour, if he had thereupon fo called his fonne : for diuifion and difperfion followeth 
"ir'u ° f P e °pleofncccffitie; and this prophefie (if any fuch had beene) might 
50 alto haue reference to the diuifion, which afterwardes fell among the Hebrewcs 
themfelucs. 

But if we giue a reafonablc time to the building of the Tower and Citty of Babel, 
by which time many people (by reafon and by demonftratiue proofc) might be in- 
creafed : and that vpon the fall thereof the confufion and diuifion followed (wherc- 



Qj 



vpon 



1 



S3- 






s 


S|| 


S 


! 


S™^ 


;- ; 


= 


sN* 


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5 


5££ 


= 


s 


is*?' 

32S 


Q 

r 



vponP/W^ tooke name) then in this opinion there is nothing either curious or 
monftrous >1 



f. 1 1 1 1- 

ofthefonnes of I o c t a n , the other fonne 
of Heber. 



Thefonncs of loffm were. 



Elmodad. 

Saleph, or Selep, or Sbelepb, 

<^Afamath, or Cbat&ar. 

lore, or larahh, or /«vtf £. 

Hadtram. 

Fzal, or r*<*/. 
, . DickUch, or !)«•/<<. 
8. obal,or Ebal,or Hobah 
o. Abimael. 
io. Sheha-.ot Seb*. 
n.Ophtr, or Optr. 
1 2. /fimfc, or cbauila,nad 
\i\.Iobab. 



io 






20 



ALL thofe Ibnnes of loctaii (according to S.' Hierome) dwelled in the Eafl 
partes of the world, or indtOyCacn from the riuer Copbe or choas , which is one 
of the branches or heads of Indus. 
But the certaine places of thofe thirteene Sonnes cannot bee gathered out of the 
Ctx«.ro.v.jo. Scriptures, the wordes of Mofes being general!, ^And their dwelling -was from Mefbn 
astbou goeJlvntoSephtr a mount in theEaFt. Of all thefl' thirteene Sonnes, there 
Were only three memorable, (to wit) Sheba, Ophir, and Hauilab. Concerning whole 
names to auoide confufion it is to bee obferued , that among the Sonnes of cbu/b, jo 
twoofthemhad alio the names of Seba and Hauilab. .^fo-Aiwhadalfoathird Saba. 
or Sbeba, his grand-child by his wife Ketura. But Seba the fonne ofchufij, and sbeba 
the fonne of Rhegma his Nephew , wee haue left in Arabia Falix : and Hauilab the 
fonne ofchufb vpon Tigris. Saba the grand-child of Abraham was ( as fome haue 
thought) the Father of the Sabdans in Perfia : of which Nations Dionyfius de Orbisfi- 
tu maketh mention. Primkm Sabai ; poll hosfunt PaJJagardit,prope verb hosfunt Tafci, 
The first are Sabxans : after tbefe be Paffagitrdx ; and neare thefe the Tafci. And where- 
as it is written : But vnto the Sonnes of the Concubines which Abraham had t A b r a- 
h ku gaue gifts, and fent them away from Isaac his fonne (while he yet liued) Eaff- 
■wardto the Eafl Countrie : hereupon it is fuppofed , that this Saba the fonne ofAbra- jp 
bam wandered into Perfia : for Perfia was accounted the furthermoft Eaft Countrie 
inrefpe£tof/«^; which alfo 0»/^ fetteth vnder the Sunne-rifing. Yetfeeing the 
reft of Abrahams Sonnes feated themfelues on the borders ofludsa, I rather choofo 
to leaue Saba the fonne of Abraham in Arabia the Defort, where Ptolemies fetteth a 
Cittie of that name. 

But Saba the fonne oflolian, the fonne of Heber, (as Iconceiue) inhabited India 
it felfe. For Dionyfius Afer'm his Periegefis, (or defoription of the world) which hee 
wrote in Greekc verfo , among the Regions of India findeth a Nation called the Sa- 
bd. Taxilus bos inter'medios habitat^ Sttbaus , In the middefi of thefe dwell the Sabxi^ 
and the Taxili, faith this Dionyfius. ' 50 



Gen.ii.v.e. 



Uetim.li. 



y AltS l <TO,[ScLI 
«CsTf6f. 



fit 



■ 


















] ^\ 



t.v. 




p 



dwelled in the £ill 
cCiui, which is one 



iinWK Somses, ' 



j^hadalfoathirii* 



^' } <r.^-«r \-<r^ii 






Qnhv.%.§.i').].')' of the HiflorieoftbelVorld. 



l 7f 



t- v. 

of O? n ik one of \oc t MtsfonnesandofpEXV andofthdl 
-voyage ^'Salomon 

OP hi r. alio was an inhabitant of theEaft/W-'-t, and as (S c . Hierome vnder- 
ftands it) in one of the Iflandes plentiful] ofgold,which are now known by the 
name of Molucca, Iofephus vnderftands Ophir to bee one of thofe great head-landcs 
in India, which by a gcnerall name are called cherfonefi, or Pen/nfuU : of which 

i o there are two very notorious ; Callecut, and LMalacca. Pererius takes it rightly for ari 
Ifland, as S c . Bieromedoth, but he fets it at the head-land of Malacca. But Ophir is 
found among the Moluccas farther Eaft. . 

Arias CMontanusout of the fecOnd o?Chronic\es, the third chapter and flxt verfe, 
gathers that Ophirwas Peru'm America, looking into the Weft Ocean , commonly 
called OHaredel Sur or the South Sea; by others Otfare pacificum. The wordes 
in the fecond of the Chronicles are thefe, And bee ouerlmed the houfe with pretious 
stones for beautie ; and the gold was gold of Paruaim. Junius takes this gold to bee 
the gold of Haialah, rememberd bycMofes in the defcription of Paradyfe : <^And 6en.2.u.&ii 
the gold of that Land is good: finding a towne in Characene a Prouince of Sufiana ?lm.l.e.c.iS. 

a o called Barbatia;[o called (ashethinkes) by corruption for Paruaim : from whence 
thole Kinges lubieclcdby Damd brought this gold, with which they prefented 
him ; and which Damd prasferued for the enriching of the Temple. 

Butthisfancieof Peru hathdeceiued many men, before cMontanus, andPlejfis, 
who alio tooke Ophir for Peru. And that this queftion may bee a fubiecf of no far- 
ther difpute-.it is very true, that there is no Region in the world of that name : lure 
Iamthatatleaft Amencahaxh none, no not any Cittie, Village, or mountaine Co 
called. But when Francis Pifarre firft dilcouered thole landes ro the South of Pana- 
ma, arriuingin that Region which Atahaltha commanded (a Prince of magnifi- 
cence, riches and Dominion inferiourtonone) lomeof the Spaniards vtterlyig- 

3 o norant of that language, demaunding by fignes ( as they could ) the name of the 
Countrie, and pointing with their hand athwart a riuer, ortorrent , or brooke that 
ran by, the Indians anfwered Peru which was either the name of that brooke , or of 



water in generall. The Spaniards thereupon concerning that the people had rightly 
vnderftood them, fait downe in the Diurnallof their enterpnfc,and loin the firft 
defcription made, and fait ouer to Charles the Emperour, all that Weft part of A- 
menca to the South of Panama had the name of Peru , which hath continued euer 
lince as diuers Spaniards in the Indies allured me ; whichallb A cofia the Iefuite in his 
naturallandmorallHiftorieof the Indies confirmeth. And whereas MontanusA- 
fb findeth, that a part of the Indies (called lucatan) tooke that name of loffan, 

40 whoasheefuppofah nauigated from the vtmoft Eaft of India to ^America : it is 
moft true, that lucatan, is nothing elfe in the language of that Countrie, but [ What 
is that ] or [ What fay you] For when the Spaniards asked the name of that place 

• (no man conceiuing their meaning) oneof theSaluages anfwered lucatan ( which 
is) What aske you, orwhat fay you? The like hapned touching Paria, a montanous 
Countrie on the South fide of Trinidado and Margarita : for when the Spaniards in- 
quiring (asallmendoe) the names of thofe new Regionswhich they dilcouered, 
pointed to the Hilles afarre off,one of the people anfwered, P<*ra,which is as much 
to fay-,zs high billes or mountaines.Vor as Pariabegmsthatmerumlousledgeok' moun- 
tains, which from thence are continued to the Strait of ^Magellan : from 8. degrees 

jo ofNorthlatitudet0 52.of South ; and lb hath that Countrie euer fince retained 
the name of Paria. 

The lame hapned among the Englifj, which I fent vnder Sir Richard Greeneuile to 

. inhabite Virginia. Forwhenlbme of my people asked thenameof that'Coiintrie, 
one of the Saluages anfwered Wingandacon , which is as much to lay , as , you weare 

good 



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goodclothes,ox gay clothes. The fame hapned to the Spaniard in asking the name of ■ 
the Ifland Triniaade : for a Spaniard demaunding the name of that felfe place which 
the Sea incompaffed , they anfwercd Caeri, which lignifieth an Ifland. And in this 
manner haue many places newly difcouered bcene intituled: of which Peru is one. 
And therefore we muft leauc Ophir among the Moluccas whereabout fuch an Ifland 
is credibly affirmed to be. 

Now although there may be found gold in Arabia it felfe (towards PerJ/a) in Ha- 
uilah , now Su/iana , and all alongft that Eaft Indian fhore ; yet the greateft plentic is 
taken vp at the Philippines , certaine Iflands planted by the Spaniards from the Weft 
India. And by thelength ofthe paflage which Salomons fhips made from the Red 10 
Sea, (which was three yeares in going and comming) it fecmeth they went to the 
vttermoft Eaft, as the ^Moluccas or Philippines. Indeedc thefe that now goe from Por- 
tugal/, or from hence, finifh that nauigation in two yeare , and fometimes lcfTe : and 
Salomons fhips went not aboucatenth part ofthisourcourfefromhence. But wee 
muft confider , that they euermore kept the coaft , and crept by the fhorcs , which 
made the way exceeding long. For before the vfc of the Compas was knowne , it 
was impoffible to nauigate athwart the Ocean ; and therefore Salomons fhips could 
not finde Peru in America. Neither was it ncedfull for the Spaniards themfelues (had 
it not beene for the plentie of gold in the Eaft India Iflands, farre aboue the mines of 
any one place of America) to faile eucry yeare from the Weft part of America thi- 2 $ 
thcr, and there to haue ftrongly planted, and inhabited the richeft of thofe Iflands : 
wherein they haue built a Cittie called Manilla. Salomon therefore needed not to 
baue gone farther off then Ophir in the Eaft, to haue fped worfe : neither could hee 
nauigatefrom the Eaft to the Weft in thofe dayes, whereas he had no coaft to haue 
guided him; 
' Tottatus alfo gathereth a fantafticall opinion out of BLabmu*, who makes Ophir to 
beaCountrie,whofemountainesof gold are kept by Griffins : which mountaines 
Solinus affirmeth to be in Scythia Aftatica, in thefe wordes. Nam cum auro &gemmis 
affluant , Griphes tenent vmuerfa, alttes ferocifim*, Arimafpi cum his dimkant, drc. For 
whereas thefe Countries abound mgold, and 'rich ft one, the Griffins defend the one andthcj 
ether : a kinde ofPowle the fiercefl af till other ; with which Griffins a Nation of people called 
Arimafti make wane. Thefe Arimafpi are laid to haue beene men with one eye only, 
like vnto the Cyclopes of Sicilia : of which Cyclopes Herodotus and Arifleus make men- 
tion: and fodoth Liican in his third Booke: and FalermsFlaccns: and D.Sictilus'mthe 
ftorie of 'Alexander LMacedon. But (formineowneopinion) Ibeleeuenoneofthem. 
Andforthefc^ra*^/, I take it that this name tignifyingOne-eyed was firftgiuen 
them by reafon that they vfedtoweare a vizard of defence, with one fight in the 
middle to ferue both eyes ; and not that they had by nature any fuch defeft. But 
£*//«».? borroweth thefe things out ofPlw/e, who fpeakes of fuch a Nation in the 
extremeNorth, at a place called Gifilitron,or the Caue ofthe Northeaft winde. For 40 
the reft, as all fables were commonly grounded vpon fome true ftories or other _, 
things done :fo might thefe tales of the 6>*$&« reccine this Morall. That if thofe "^ 
men which fight againft fb many dangerous paffages for gold, or other riches ofthis 
world, had their perfect fenfes , and were not depriued of halfe their eye-fight ( at 
leaft of the eye of rightreafon and vnderftanding) they would content themfelues 
with a quiet and moderate eftate; and not fubiect themfelues tofamine corrupt 
aire, violent heate, and cold, and to all forts of miferable difeafes. And though this 
tablebe famed in this place, yet if fuch a taleweretold of fome other places ofthe 

world, wherewildbeafts orSerpentsdefendmountainesofgold,itmi g litbeauow- 
ed. For there are in many places ofthe world,cfpecialIy in America, many high and 60 
impaflablc mountaines which arc very rich and full of gold, inhabited only with 
1 igers, Lyons, and other rauenous and cruell beafts : into which if any man afcend 
(except his ftrength bee very great) hee fhall bee fure to finde the fame warre,which 
the>^>makea S ainfttheGr#>;, .• not that the one or other had any fenfeof 

gold, 



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gold, or fecke to defend that mcttall, but being difquieted.or made afraide of them- 
iL'lucs or their young ones, they grow imaged and •aducnturous. In like fort it may 
befiidJ^OT the Alcgartos , (which the "Egyptians call the Crocadyles) defend thofe 
Pearlc's which lye in the Lakes of the Inland : for many times the poore Indians arc 
eaten v-p by them, when they diucforthepearle. And though the <^flegartoskno\v 
not fb« pearlc , yet they findefauourintheflefhandbloud of the Indians, whom 
theydeuoure. 



177 



10 



13 



t. VI. 

of H avi l Aii the fonnc u/Ioctan, who dlfo paffed into the East Indies; 

and of M e s h a and Sei'hek named in the bordering of the families 

of I o is t a n : with aconclufwn of this difcourfe touching 

the plantation of the world. 

I F Haiuhh the feme of Ioflan, there is nothing elfl* to be laid , but that the ge- 
nerall opinion is,tbat he alio inhabited in the Eaft India in the Continent,from 
which ophir\>a& into the Iflarids adioyning. And whereas Ganges is laid to water 
Hauilah, it is meant by Hauilah in the Eaft India, which tooke name of Hauilah the 
fonnc Q?loctan: but Hauilah, which Pz/wscompafTeth, was 16 called offfauikh, the 
Ibnne of chufi, as is formerly pro'ued by this place of Scripture. S a v tfmote the_j 
Amalckites from Hauilah, as thou commeftto Shur, which is before t^gypt. But that 
Saul cucr made warrc in the Eaft India, no man hath flifpecled. For an end we may 
conclude, that of the thirtcenc fbnncsof lotion, thefc three Saba,Hauilah, and Ophir^ 
though at the firft feated by their brethren about the Hill CMafius or Mefh , Gen. 1 o.. 
^o ! . (to wit) betweene Ciltcia aftd Mefopotamia; yet at length either themfelues or 
their iffucsremoued into Eaft India, leaning the other families of loclan, to fill the 
Countries ofthcir firft plantation , which the Scripture defines to haue becne from 
^ UHefh vnto Sephar. And although S.Hierome take OMefh to bee a Region of the Eaft 
50 India, and Sephdr a mountaine of the fame (which mountaine^/c»^»«j would haue 
to be the Andes in America) thofe fancies are farre . beyond my vnderftanding. For 
thcword(Eaft) in the Scriptures, where it hath reference to ludaa, is neuer farther 
extended then into Perfia. But LMefchis that part of themountaines of UWafesm 
the North of Mefopotamia , out of which the Riner chaboras fpringcth which run- 
neth by Charran : and in the fame Region we alio finde for Sephar ( remembred by 
<JMofes) Sffhara by Ptolomie, {landing to the Eaftof themountaines Mafias ; from 
whence loclan hauing many fbnnes, fbme of them might pafTe into India, hearing of 
the beautie and riches thereof ButthiswasinproeefTeoftime. ■ ,,. 

The other fafhion of planting I vndcrftand not, being grounded but vpon mens 
40 imaginations , contrarie to reafbn and poffibilitie. And that this mountaine in the 
Eaft was no farther off then in thofe Regions before remembred , it appearethby 
many places of the Scripture where the fame phrafc is vied : as in lumbers 13. B a- 
1. a c the King of Moab hath brought me from fyiram, out of the mountaine of the Eait- r 
which was from the Eaft part of Mefopotamia. For Ba'lac brought Balaam out of Me- 
fopotamia, (witnefTe this place of Detitcronomie_j.) Becaufe they hired Balaam/^ 
fonne of B £ o k, ofPethor in Aram Naharaifm, to curfe thee : for Aram 2{jiharaifm was 
Syria fiuuwrum, which is Mefopotamia, as aforefaid. 

This plantation of the world after the floud doth beft agree, (as to me it feemes) 
with all the places of Scripture compared together. And thefc bee the reports of 
50 reafbn and probable conicctiire ; the guides which I haue followed herein, and 
.' which I haue chofen to goe after, making no valuation of theppjnions of men, con- 
duffed by theirowne fancies: bethey'ancientormoderne. Neither haue I any end 
herein, priuatc, or publike, other then the difcouerie of truth. Forasthepartialitie 
. of man to himfelfe hath difguifed all things : lb the factious and hireling Hiftorians 

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178 Tbefir/l'BoofyoftkefirJlpart Chaf.^.^.l 

of all Ages (efpecially of thefc latter times) haue by their many volumes of vntrue 
reports left Honour-without a Monument, and Vertue without Memqrjc : and (in - 
fteadcthereof) haue erected Statues and Trophies to thofe, whomtHedarkeft for- ' 
gctfulncffc ought to haue buried , andcoucredoucrforeuermore. Andalthough 
the length and diflbluing nature of time hath worne out or changed the names and 
\ memone of the worlds firft planters after the floud (I meanethegreateft number 
„ and moft part of them; yet all the footfleps of Antiquitie (as appeares by that 
which hath beenefpoken) arc not quite worn e out nor oucrgrowne : for Babylon 
hath to this day the found of Btbel • Phoenicia hath Zidon, to which Citric the eldeft 
Sonne ofcmaangme name ; fo hath CiliciaTharfis ; and the ^Armenians, Medes, 1© 
Hiberims, Cappadccians, Phrygians, the Syrians, idumaans, Libyans, Moores, and other 
Nations ; haue preferued from the death of forgetfulneffe fome fignes of their firft 
Founders and true Parents. 



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C H 



A P. 



IX. 



Of the beginning and ejlabli/hing of 
Cfwernement. 



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.. jrldbeg; 
to receiuc Rule and Goucrnemcnt , which ( wh^lc it 
had fcarcitie of people) vnder-went no rjther Domi- / 
nion then Paternitie and Eldcrihip. For the Fathers ' ; 
of Nations were then as Kings.and the eldeft offami- 
lies as Princes. Hereof it came,that the word (Elder) 
was alwaies vfed both for theMagiftrate,and for thofe 
of age and grauitie .- the fame bearing one figniticati- ■ 
on almoft in all languages. For in the eleuenth of 
Numbers God commanded CMofes to gather together , 
70. of the Elders of the people, and Gouernours ouer 
them : the Hebrew bearing the fame fenfe,which the Latine word Senesox Seniores^ /<s ,. 
doth. Soitis written in J«/W*, Then the Afjembly beleeued them as 'thofe that were_j 
the Elders and Judges of the people. And fb in the words of thofe falfe Iudges and wit- 
nefTesto Daniel, Shevoitvnto vs,feetngGodhath giuenthee the office of an Elder . De- 
mofihenes vfeth the fame word for the Magiftrate among the Grecians. Cicero in Ca- 
to giucth two other reafons for this appellation: ^ipud Laced&monios qui amplifi- 
'mum magiflratum gerunt, -vt funt,ficetiam appeffantur Senes , ^Amongthe Lacedemo- 
nians the chiefe Magistrates, as they are,fe are they called Eldermen : and againe , Ratio & 
prudentia mfi efjent tnfenibus non fummum Concilium iMaiores nostri appcUaffent Sena- 
tarn, lTre~afbnandAdiiifementvi!erenotinoldmen,ourAnccftershAdneuercaUedthehigh- 
efl Counceflby the name of a Senate. But though thefe reafons may well be giuen, yet 
we doubt not but in this name of (Elders) fo r Goue rnours or Counfailers of State, 
therein L ajjg_nejthat the firft Gouernours were the Fathers of families ; _and vnder Y 

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G h ap.^.I. of the Hijiorie of the World. 



179 



them the cldcft Sonncs. And from thence did the French, Italian, and Spaniard take S 
the word ( Signer] and out ot'it fSeignouneJ tbrLordfhip and Dominion : lignifying ^ 
(according to Z^/m^puiflance in proprieties proper power. Thekindesof this ( 
Seignounc, Seneca makes two : theone, Poteft^sautrmperium, Power or command -.the J 
other , Propriety ant dominium, Propnetie or maftcrflrip ; the corrdatiue of the one is 
thefubiect, of'the other the flaue. AdCxfarem (faith he ) potest as omnium pert.net^ 
proprietas, Csifarhath power oner all '$ andeuerymanproprietiein his ownc^j: 



and 



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mum mikiiim, 
& immuUbilU 
frmiienth />»• 
ttSlts. 



agame, Cdfar omnia imperw pofidetjhguli dorxmio, ' C.t/.v' ' hohleth all :n his power, 
andeuery man foffeffetb his own.e.Buc as men and vice beganneaTxindantiy to increafc: , 3 
1 o fo obedience , ( the fruit ofnaturall rcucrence , which but from excellent feede fel- ' 
l domcripeneth) being exceedingly ouerlhadowed with pride, and ill examples vt- 
" terly withered and fell away. And tbefbft weapons ofpaternall perfwalions (after 
,' mankindc beganne to neglect and forget the original! and firft giuer of life) became 
j inalloucr-weake, eithcrtorefift the rirft inclination of euill, or after (when it be- 
came habituall) to conftraincit. So that now, when the hearts of men were only 
j guided and fleered by their owne fancies , and toff too and fro on the tempeftuous 
. / Seas of the world , while wifedomc v/as feuered from power , and ftrength from 
' chantic; Neceffitie (which bincleth euery nature but the immortail) made both the 
Wife arid FooLTh vnderftand at once , that the eftatc of reafonable men would bc- 
a'p come farrc more miferable then that of beafts, and that a generali floud ofconfufioii 
would a fecond time ouerflow them , did they not by agenerall obcdicucaio order 
and dominion preuentit. For the Mightie , who miffed in their owne ftrengths, 
found others againe (by interchange of times) more mightie then themfelues : the 
feeble fell vnder the forcible; and the equall from equall receiued equall harmes. 
Info much that licentious diforder ( which feemed to promife a libertievpon the 
firft acquaintance) proued vpona better trial], no lefTe perilous then an vnindurable 
bondage. 1 - 

Thcfe Arguments by Neceffitie propounded , and by Reafon maintained and 

confirmed, perfwaded alFNations which the Heauerts couer,to fubieftthem fellies 

30 toaMafter,and toMagiftracieih fomedegree. Vnder which Gouernement, as the 

change (which brought with it leffe euill,then the former mifchiefes) was generally 

plealingrforime (making all men wife that obferuc it ) found fbme imperfection 

and corrofiuemthis cure. And therefore the fame Neceffitie which intientcd , and 

the fame Reafon which approucd foueraignc power, bethought themfelues of cer- 

• tainc equall rules, in which D ominion (in tbebeginnine boundlefle) might alfo dip 

, ccrne her owne limits. For before the indention of Lawes , priuatc affections in fu- '■ ~s<e-° 

premc Rulers made their owne fancies both their Tf eaTurers and Hangmen : mea- 

furing by this yard, and waighing in this ballance both good and euill. 

Foras wifid^rneinEldcrfhip preceded the rule of Kings : fo the will of Kings 
43 fore-went the inuentionsof lawes. Popuhu nullis legibm tenebatur : arbitria princi- 
pum pro legibm erant,^ the people were not goucrned by any other lawes then the wi'des of ' 
Princes : Hereof it followed, that when Kings left to bee good, neither did thole 
mens vcrtucs value them which were not fancied by their Kings , nor thofc mens 
^ vicesdeforme them that were, ^imorinterjimimnus-videt, inter dum nihil videtfyf 
■ Lone fees one while too much, anothenvfiile flarke nothing. Hence it came to-paTTe, that 
afterafewyeares (far direction and reftraint of Royall power) Laweswerecfta- 
blifhcd : and that gouernement which Had this mixture of equalitie [holding in ail 
euen ballance fuprcme power and commonright) acquired the title of Regal! : the 
other ( which had it not ) was kno wne for Tyrannical! : the one God eftablilhed in 
50 fauour of his propje : the other he permitted for theiraffliction. 

In the infancie of this Regall authoritie, Princfiaxa thgjMVere cho fon for the ir f'g'f 
vemi«only • fo did they mcafure their powers by a great deaLe of 'moderation. And 
tRemore(faith Fabtus Put or) Principes, quia tiiftt erant,eyreligiombus dediti,mrehabiti vc iuraftenk, 



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And though (fpeaking humanely) the beginning ofEmpire may bee afcribed to 
reafonandneceffitie; yet it was God himfelfe that firft kindled this light in the 
minds ofmen, whereby they £aw that they could not liue and bee prefcrued with- 
out a Ruler and Conductor: God himfelfe by hiseternall prouidence hauing or- 
dayned Kings; and the law of Nature leaders, and Rulers ouer others. For the ve- 
rie Bees hauc their Prince s the Deere their Leaders; and Cranes ( by order impo- 
ftd j watch for their owne fefetie; The moft High beareth rule ouer the Kingdomescf 
men; andappointeth otter it whomfieuer bepJeafeih.By me (fifth IV/fedemeJpoken by the 
Son of God) Kmgsraigne; by me Princes rule,and it is God (lakh Daniel) that ftutb'vp 
K,ngs,andtakethaway Kings .-and that this powerisgiucn from God, Christ himfelfe 
witnefleth, fpeaking to Pilate. Thou couldefi haue no power at alt against mee , except it 
ivere giuen thee from ah one . 

It was therefore by a threefold iuftice that the world hath becne gouerned from 
the beginning, (to wit) By a itiftieenflturall ;~ jhv which the Parents and £lders of fa- : 
milies gouerned their children, and ficpHewes, and families', in which gouerncment 
the obedience was called natural! pietie : againe, byaiufticediuine ,drawne from the 
lawes and ordinances of God : and the obedience hereunto was called confeience; 
and laftly by a niftkexiuill 4 begotten by both the former : and the obedience to this' 
we call dutie. That by thefe three thofe of the eldeft times were commanded : and 
that therulein generall was .paternaJJU « is moft euident : for ^tdam being Lord o- 20 
uer his owne children, inftruited thcmintheferuiccofGodhis Creatour; aswee 
reade, Cam and Abel brought Oblations before God , as they had bcene taught by 
their Parent, the Father of mankinde. 



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Of the three commendable forts ofGouernement with their oppofites : and of 
the degrees of humane focieti<LJ. 

Hat other pollicie was exercifed , or ftate founded afterfuch time as *a< 

mankinde was greatly multiplyed before thefloud, it cannot beeccr- 

tainly knowne,though it feeme by probable conieaurc,that the fame 

was not without Kings in that firft age : it being poffible that many 

Princes of the Egyptians (remembred among their antiquities) were 

before the generall floud ; and veryjjkcjy^that jhfcmislLQBBrefflons in that age « 

proceeded fromjfom£tyj^njeJji.Gojien}^CTt i or'trorrTfome rougherforme of 

rule, then the paternall.* 

^■^afcribeth the rule of the world in thofe dayes to the Giants of Ltbanus. 
who maftred (faith he) all Nations from the Sunne-rifing to the Sunne-fet. But in * 
the fecond age of the world, and afterfuch time as the rule of Elderfhip failed three 40 
fcueraJJ Jortio£GojLerne_ment were in fcuerall times eftabliflied among men accoF 
ding to the diuers natures of places ahd people. 

T he firft, the moft ancient, moft generall, and moft approued,was the Gouerne- 
ment of one, ruling by iuft lawes, called Monarchies .- to which Tyranme is oppifcj, ; 
y o . oeing alfo a foleand abfolute rule , exerci/ecTaccording to the will of the Comman- 
■> y der , without refpeft or obferuation of the lawes of God , or Men For a lawful! 
Prince or Magiftrate (faith Aristotle) is the keeper of right and equine • and of this 
condition ought euery Magiftrate to be,accordingto the rule ofGods word, migesj 
an dof peers /halt thou make thee m thy Citties : And thefe (hall md?e the people withrW~ 
tcoits lodgement. ~^_T i ro 

The fecond Gouernemcnt is of diuers principall perfons eftabliflied byorder, ' 
and ruling by lawes, called Arffocracie, or optimatunt potest as ; to which oligarchic ' 
(or the particular faction and vfurpation of a few great ones) is oppofrd : as the 
Decemvm^r Triumviri, and the like, 

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SSrawne from the 

^called confeience; 

beobediencctothis 

tc commanded: and ■ 

^.wbcinoLordo-i: 

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ia<Jb<\*nctauchtby 



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unded after fuch time as j: 
flood, ltcannotbera- 
: onieaurc,thattkfat 
.mepoffibkthatiaj 
andquirie)* 



Cm 



AP.O-5'i2. 



of the Hfhrte of the World. 



181 



the Giants oi 



fri« 



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eol 

ji' ! 



5*5 



11 j* 



The third is a Statepopuiar, (or Gouernement of the people) called Bemocratia, 



to which isoppofcd Otbi 



or theturbulent vniuft ruling of the confufed irml- 



.Jj^ 






titudcj feditioiiity fwaying the ftate , contrarieto their ownelawesand ordinances. 
T hefe three kinds of Gouernemen t are briefly expreit by 1 holofmus s I'mus, paiw 
fum,& multornin , Of one t of few, of "many. 

■ Now as touching the beginning and order of pollicie fince the fccond incrcafe of 
mankind?, the fame grew in this fort : Firft of all, cuery Father,or eldcft ofthe fathi- 
lie, gauc la wes toj jisjowne jflucs , and to the people fromhim and them iiicreafed. . 
Thefe as they were multiply ed into many houfholds ( man by nature lonihg fbcie- 

to tie) ioynedjth.eir Cottages together in one common field or Village , which the La- 
tines call yicus ; of the Greike AJntj which fignifieth a home , or of the word ( Via) 
becaufe it hath diuers Wales and pathsleading to it. And as the firft hoiife crew 
into a Village, fo the Village into that which is called Pagiis, ( being a fbcietie ofdi- 

" tiers Villages) fo called ofthe Greel:emy«, which fignifieth a fountaine : becaufe ma- 
ny people (haumg their habitations not farre afiinder) dranke of one fpring or 
ftreame of water. To this word the Engliffa Hundreds, or (as fbmc thinke) Shires 
- anfwereth not vhlitiy. 

Butas men and impietie beganne to gather fircngth , and as emulation and pride 
bctweene the races of the one and the other daylie incrcafed : fo both to defend 

20 themfelues from outrage, and to preferuc fuch goods as. they had gathered, they ; 
beganneto ioyne_and fet together diuers of their Villages , inuironing them firft ' 
with banks and ditches-, and afterwards with wals : which being fo compafied were 
then called Oppida j cither ab opponent'* fehoiiibm, Becaufe wals were oppo fed again ft 
enemies, or ah opibus, becaufe thither they gathered their riches for fafetie and defence : 
asalfothey were called Vrbes, ab orbe; becaufe when they were to build a Citric, 
they madea Circle with a Plough (faith yarroj therewith meafuringandcempaf- 
iing the ground which they wenttoinclofeorforti/ie. And although Vrbs andev- 
urtAs be often confoundcd.ycr the difference wasanciently in thiSjthatA-WvfiGnified 
no other then the very wais and buildings , and Cimtas was taken for the Cittizens, 

3 o inhabiting therein : fo called ofCiuis 3 and tha&«$ eo qmdtnnltitudo coiuit, ofcormving 
together. But all inhabitan ts With in thefe wals are not properly Cittizens,but only 
fuch asareca lled^ree-men : who B earing proportfonably the charge of the Cittie 
mav by tnrnes h jrbrne Officer*! anH Magiftrates thcreofi tjiereltgoe vnderiEiame 
of fiibiccts, though Cittizens by the fame generall name of fubieefs are alio knownc. 
For cuery Cittizen is.alfaii. fubiect , but not euery- fiibieft a Cittizen : perhaps alio 
ibme Cittizen (as thechiefe Magiftrate , ifhebe to be termed oneof the Cittizens) 
isno fubiect ; butofthisweneedenotftandto inquire. The word (Magiftrate) 
is taken a Magistro , from a. Mafler, and the word (Matter) from the Aduerbe Magis 
(as alio magisleria , precepts of art J or elfe from the Greeke word ( MegiHos: ) and 

4a fb the Greekes call them Megiftanes , whom the Latines call Magnates or Ma- 
giHntm. 

Theoffice and dutie of euery Magiftrate thrift otlehath written in few wordes. mic.fi 
K_A r Magiftrate or Pri nce (faith he) is thekeeper of right andequitie; butthefameis 
bell • aught by S c . Paul, who exprefleth both thecaiife efficient, and finall, (that is) 
by whom Magiftrates and Princes are ordayned , together with their duties and of- 
fices. A_Magtjhjj.te is the minifler of God for thy -W ealth -Jbujifthou, doe euilt, fearefor i^om.iiM 
he bearephnolfff^fworZforjjQjight. For he is the minister of God , to lake vengeance on ~~~ 
him that doth euilt. He alfbteacheth in the fame place, that euery foule ought to be_j v.t. ~ 
fubiect to the higher powers, becaufe they are by God ordayned ; and that wboj'oaierre- ». ~x 
JO fr/teth that power , refifeth God, thegiuerand fbuntaineThereof: and fliall not only 

be therefore fubiecf to theiudgementand condemnation of Man , but of God : For ibkl.v.t, 
yee must be fubiect (faith he) not becaufe of wrath only, bu*alfofor confciencefal:e_j. 

The examples are not to be numbredj^fGodspmHlOTicnrs vpon thofe that haue 
refitted authoritie , f>y Gbdofdayn ed alid^ablilhe^rT?ei trTcroDght any fubiect 

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\itrm.19.vii 

'Ccn.zo.v.ij. 



.therefore to relift the power of Kings , becaufe they may be taxed with iniuftice or • 
7 s cruejtie : forjtplea£.th,God fomctimes to punifh his people by a rvrannous hand : ■ 
and the commandemeiit of obedience is without diftinctioii. 1 feSmhetsmk U 
Christ himfelfe fubiecled th craTcluesto the power of Magifthic k. Christ com man- K 
dedthat all due to C^cfhould be giucn vnto him : and hee payed tribute for him- 
felte and Peter. Micremie commanded the ifraelites ( euen thole that were captmes 
vnder Heathen Kings) to pray for them, and fbr the peace of "Babylon So Abr tham 
prayed for Abimelech; and WbleffedtheKingof ^Egyp. And it J, acceptable in 
the Jightof our Sauiour {klthPaulj that yee make Applications and Prayers for Kinzs and 
for all that are in authority. .-and if for iuch Kings as were Idolatrous , much more JO 
for Chnfoan Kings and Magiftrates. And fomuch did SKChrjfoftome in his Homi- 
, lie to the people preferre Ato^fe// Gouernement, as he rather commended the 
__ rule of Kings (though Tyrants) then that they mould bee wanting : Prsfiai mem . 
tyrannum habere, quamnulhm, Better a tyr anno ,u King , thennoMm- to which alio 
r^/tf fubfenbeth. Prtfiat (fiith" Tactic in the firft of his Hiftoric) /^ mdoprinape 



- ^f, -fjl^qttbn Jubnullo, It is better tjhaue a bad Prince then none at all. And b e they good 



ir°- 



?uilV 



^ fyrjifr 6f^icruethem ^equeemmlibertasmmvllaejl (£mh ClaudianJ anhn Domino feruirc^ 
W %'el ( 7U. | ' ' % W//r(faith he) more fafe forvsthentobeferuantstothe-vertitous. Andcer- 

CX°$frM* tal " ] y howfoeuer it may be difputed , yet is it fafer to Ike vnder one Tyrant then 
^qnder i ooooo. Tyrants : vnder a wile man that is cruell, then vnder the foolifh and 
barbarous crueltie of the multitude. For as AgejjLds anTwered a Cittizen "oT Sparta. 
that defircd an alteration of the gouernement, That kinde of rule which a man 
would difdaynein his owne houte, were very vnfit to gouerne great Regions by ' 

Laftly, as many Fathers erected many Cottages for their many children • and as 
(forthcreafon before remembfed ) many houf holds ioyned themfelues together 
and made Villages 5 many Villages made Citties .- lb when thefe Citties and Citri- 
zens ioyned together, and cftablifhed lawes by confent , ailbciating thcmfelues vn- 
der one Gouernour and gouernment, they To ioyned were called a Commonwealth- 
the fame being fometimesgouerned by Kings; fomctimes by Magiftrates • fomc- 
times by the people themielnes. 



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-^ 




It 



It 



$. III. 

Of the good Gouernement of the first Kings. 

\ Ow this firft Age after the floud , and after fuch time as the people 
j weremcreafed, and the families became ftrong, and difperfed into fe- 
} uerall parts of the world , was by ancient Hiftonans called Golden : 
> AjBDJUoaand Couetoutheifc being as then but greene, and newly £ 
l grownevp, thefeedes and effects whereof were as yet but potential! 
andintheblowthandbudde. ForwhilctheLaw of Nature was the rale of mans • 
life , they then fought for no larger Terntorie then themielnes could comp^ffeand ^^ 
manure : they ercctednoothermagnificenrbuildings,then fufficicnt to defend them ' 
from cold and tempeft : they cared for no other delicacie of fire, orcuriofiticof 
dyet , then to maintayne life ; nor for any other apparell then to couer them from 
the cold, the Rainc and the Sunne. Zip /ft M* 

AndfureifwevnderftandbythatAge (which was called Golden) theancie^^-^ 
iimplicity of our forefathers , this name may then truly bee caft vpon thofe elder 
times : but if it be taken otherwife, then, whether theiame may be attributed more T o 
to any one time then to another, (I mcane to one limited time and none elie) it may 
bee doubted. For good and golden Kings make good and golden Ages and all 
times haue brought forth of both forts. And as the infanae of Empine , ( when 
Princes played thar prizes, and did then only woo men to obedienre) might bee 

called 



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Ethics 

ommcndcdthe 
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-•to which alfo 

wnuUfrwatt 

•dkthcvgood 

' * cnt0 ' x 

■ Andcer- 
neTyHDt,tknao| 
irthcfooiilhand , 
noTsjw/j ' 
iilc which a man 
at Regions by. 
v children: and as 
ojctkr, 
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'•yGo!«» : 









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hap .9.^.5 . cy>//6- Hijtorif of the World. 



18* 



called the golden Age: fo may the beginning of all Princes times bee truly called 
' golden, for be it that men affect honour it is then beft purchafed ; or if honour af- 
feet men, it is then that good deferuings haue commonly the Icaft impediments • 
and if eucr Liberalise ouerflow her bankes and bounds, the iTime is then befl war- 
ranted both by pollicie and example. But AgeandTrmedoer.otonlvhardenand 
iMnke the openeft and moft/w^/ hearts i/but the experience which it bringeth 
with it layeth Princes torne eftatcs before their eyes.and (withall) perfwadeth theiu 
to companionate themfelues. And although there bee no Kings v'nder the Sunne 
whofe meanes areanfwcrablc vnto other mens deirres j.yct fiich as value all things 
i-o byjhcjrjixvjKB;fpects-, doe no foonerfinde their appetites vnanfwered, burthey 
complaincof alteradon, and account the times iniunous and yron. And as this fol- 
ic* out in the raigne of euery King, fo do'thlt in the life of eucry man , if his dayes 
bee many : for our younger yeares are our golden A,ge • which being eaten vp by 
. time, we praifc thole feafons which ouryouth accompanied : and (mdeede) the 
grieuoiis alterations in our /clues, and thepaines and difcafcs which neuer part from 
vs but at thegrauc, makcthetimes feemefo differing and difpleafing : efpccially the 
qual itie of mansjiaturc being alio fiich > as itadorethand extollcth the paffogesof 
the former, and condemneth the prefent ftate ho w iuft foeucr. Fit human* mdi^ti- raatin -Did. 



,• 'P 



r/^l 



trtis vitio, vtfemper -vetera in lande,pr&fentu mfafiidio fat, It comes topajfc (faith Ta- * °"'- 

ao citus) by the -vice of oar maligmtie, th.tt wealwaies extoll the 'time pas?, andholdthe prefent 
faftidions : For it is one ofthe errours ofway ward age. Quodfint laudatores tempons 
, aUi,That they are praifersof forepajfed times , forgetting thisaduifeof Salomon. Say Elekr , 
not then why is it that the former dayes were better then thefe ? for thou dc eft not inquires ' 

wifely of this thing : to which purpofe Seneca. CKtioresnoHri quefti funt, &nos queri- 
mur,po fieri querentur, euerfos efiie mores, regnare nequitiam , in deter ius res hominum , & 
inomneneftslabi, Our Anceslers haue complained, we doe complained , our children will 
coniplaine,that good manners are gone, that wickednejfe doth raigne , and all thinges now 
wor/eandworfe, and fall into all eui/l. Thefe are the vfuall difcourfes of Age and mif- 
fortunc. But hereof what can we adde to this of Armbius. Nouares quandoivctus Ambfa 

30 fiet,&vetus temponbus quibus c<ep -it nouafuit-dr repentina, Whatfocuer is new , mtime^t 
full be made old: and the ancicntefi thinges whentheytooke begmningxverealfonewand 
fodaine. Wherefore not tojand in much admiration of thefe firft times, which the . 

. difcontentmenB^of preTcnt timeshaue m adegolden , tfiiT wcTma ; 0etclownelor 

certaine.Thatasitwas the vertuc of thefiHFKings , which (after God) gauethem r 

Crowncs : fo the loue of their people thereby purchafed , held the fame Crownes \ *? 
. on their heads. And as God gaue the obedience of fubiedts to Princes : f fo(rela- 
tiuely) hegaue the care and iuftice of Kings to the Subiefts ; hauingreJrpecl,not on- 
ly to the Kings themfelues , but euen to thejneaneft of his Creatures. 'Nunquam wi[d.$ r 
parliculari bono feruitomne bonum , The infinite goodneffc of God doth not attend am one 
40 onh^for he that made the fmall and thegreat , careth for all alike : and it is the care 
wffich Kings haue of all theirs, which makes them beloued of all theirs; and by a 

■ generall louejt is, that Princes hold agenerall obedience : For Poteftashumanaradi- 
caturinvoluntatibus hominum, All humane tower is rootedtn the will or di/pofttions of 
men. JI J 



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Thefirfi c Bool{eoftbe fir Jl part Chap.c?.^. 



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0/7iv beginning of Nobilities ': and of the vaine vaunt thereof 
without vertttes. 




Sty 



Nd with this fupremc Ruleand Kingly authoritic beganne alfo other 
I degrees and differences among fubiccb. For Princes made election of 
\ others by the fame rule, by which rhemfelucs were chofen; vnto 
, whom they gauc place, truft , and power. From which imployments 
and offices fprung thofe Titles, and thofe degrees of Honour, which 10 
Verm nobilis haue continued from age to age to thefe daycs. But this Nobilitic , or difference 
iwn nafeitur from the Vulgar, was not in the beginning giucn to the fuccefflon ofbloud , but to . 
jedfit. fucceffionofvertue, as hereafter may bee proued. T hough atlcngth it was fuffi- • 

cient for thofe whofe Parents were aduanced, to be knowne for the bonnes of iiich 
Fathers: and fb there needed then no endcauour of well-doing at all, or any con- 
tention for them to excell , vpon whom glorie or worldly Nobilitie neceffarily def- 
cended. Yet hereof had Nobilitie denomination in the bcginning^Th it fuch as ex- 
celled others in virtue were fo called. Hinc dicJus Nobilts , qua.fi viriute p\z alijs no- 
tabtlis. But after fiich time as the deferued Honour of the Father was giuen in re- 
ward to his pofteritie , S c . Hierome iudged of the fucceflion in this manner. Nihil ao 
almd video in Nobilitatc appetendum, nifi quod Nobilesqiudam necefttate confiringantur, 
ne ab antiquornmprobitate degencrent, I fee no other thing to be affected in Nobilities, , 
, , j a then that Noblemen are by a kinde \of 'necefitie bound not to degenerate fi-Din the vertue of 

theirAriMsL. Forif Nobilitie bew/«5 ■ & antrquadiuitja . I ertue and ancient riches, 
then to exceede in all thofe thing es whichnrc extra hominem , as riches, power, glo- 
rie, and the like, doe no otherwife define Nobilitie, then theword (animal) alone 
doth define a reasonable man. Or if honour ( according to X. Vines) be a witnefTe 
of vcrtue and well-doing : and Nobilitie ( after Plutarch) the continuance of vertue 
in a race or linage : then are thofe in whom vcrtue is extinguifhed , but like vnto 
pamtcd and printed papers, which ignorant men worfhip in fteade of Christ, our 30 
L adle, ap j other Saints : men, in whofntHere rcmaine but the dregges and vices of * 
ancient vertue: Flowers, and nearly wjychby change of foile and want of manu- 
ring are turned to weedes. For what is found praife-wqrthy in thofe waters, which, 
had their beginning out of pure fountaines, if in all the reft of their courfethey 
Pmtjtiiyck. runne'foule, filthie, and defiled ? Ex terra fertili producitur aliquando cicutavenenofa, 

& ex terra Jlerilt fretiofum aurum , Out of fruit full ground arifeth fometimes poy fining ■ , 
• henbane : and out of barren fide pretious geld. Foras all thinges confift of matter and 
forme, fb doth charron (in his Chapter ofNobilitie) call the race and linage but the 
matter ofNobilitie : the forme (which giues life and perfeft being) he maketh to be 
vcrtue, and qualitie,profitable to the Commonweal c. Farjh_ee is truly and entirely aq 
Noble, who maketh a Angular profeffion of publike vcrtue , feruing his Princeand 
Countric, and being defcended of Parents and Ancefters that haue done the like. 
And although that Nobilitie, which the fame Authour calleth perfonall, (the fame 
which our felues acquire by ourvertueandwelldeferuings) cannot bee ballanced 
with that which is both naturall by deflent, and alfo perfbnall; yet if vertue bee 
wanti ng to the natural! , then is the perfbnall and acquired Nobilitie by many de- 
grees to be preferred : For (faith this charron) this Honour (to wit) by defcent,may 
">'.Jjght: ; v^p^fijch ! a,onc, asin his ownenaturcis a true Villaine. There is alfo a third 
t ,. (_ Nobilitic wnich'he calleth N obilitie in Parchment , bought with filuer or fauour : 
*** ^T^u^^ . anc ^ thefe be indeede but Honours of affection , which Ranges with the change of 50 
^20- -' ' ' their fancies wifh they knew well how to wipe off againe. Butfurely.if we had as 
much fenfe^f our degenerating in worthinefTc, as w,e haue of vanitiein deriuing our 
felues of fuclf and fuch Parents, weefhould rather know fuch Nobilitie (without 
vertue) to be fhame and dishonour, then Noblcnefle , and glorie to vaunt thereof: 

\?e** nobiHta^ \nttiH f^V_f> n'hat 



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C h a p . I o.^.i . of the Hiflorie of the World. 



1S5 



Whatcdamitie is wanting (faith Bknas. d) to him that is borne in finite, of a fotfh 



Ure inKard.ll.it 



2-3 



body and barren minde? tor (according to the fame Father.) Dele fa cum fugacishono- <W*W£«- 
ris hums, cy mde coronat&nitcrem gloru, &c. Wipejway the pa inting of tins fleelimho- & a -'' a !- 
Hour , and the glittering of the ill-crowned glories \ that then Wotmaiefi cimfider thy ' 
felfe nakedly :for thou earnest naked out of thy Mothers iyombe_j. Camefl thou theme with 
thy UMyter, or gliffening with Jewels , or garmfhed with filkes , or adorned with feathers, 
or faffed with gold ? if thou fcatter andblow away allthefe by thy con fi deration ascertain^ 
mjrnmgcloudss, whkhJpeor wti.fawne pafe oner, thouflmlt meeie with a naked,andpoore, 
mdwretched, andmiferable man, andblufmng, becaufe he is naked, ani weeping becaufas 
j o he is borne, and repining becaufe he is borne to labour, and not to honour. 

Forastouchingjhe matterof all mcn,thcrc is no difference betwecne it and duft: 
which it thou, doejL not keleeue ( faith S. C h r y s o s t o m e ) looke into the Sepulcher's ChryfflMmU 2, 
• and Monuments oftby±Jn£eflers,andthey fijalleafily perfwade thee by their own'e example deincompofita 
that thou art dift and dirt; fo that if man •■ feeme more Noble andbeautifullthen dull this «f f""™' 
proceedethnotfrom the diuerfiitie of hii nature,butfiomthe cunning of Ins Creatour. 



cw.j. 



For true Nobilitie ftandcth in the Trade 
Ofvertuouslife; notinthcflcl hly line: 
For bloud is brute, but Gentr ic is"diu7n c> 



20 



Vhaet. 
^^u-v. Jl^vt". K^ ; """^ if 



Andhowfoeuerthecuftomeoftheworldhauemadeitgood, that Honours be caft ' '"*" 



. bybirthvponvnworthyifTues:yetA«/<%w» (as* wife as any King) rcprehendeth 

' the fame in his fellow-Princes. There is an euill (faith he) that 1 hauefeene -under thej E y 

_ Sunne,as an errour that proceedeth from the face ofhim that rdeth. Eolliejs Jet in_great 



I0( 



excellencies. 



3° Chap. X. 

Ofbl 1 m r o d, B e l v s t and N 1 n v s : and of memo* 
rable thinges about thofe times. 



Thai 



4l* 



40 



$. I. 

MB.OD was the first after the floud that raignedlike foucraigne Lord : and 
that his beginning feemeth to haue beene ofiuft authoritte. 

H E JirJtofall that raigned as foueraignc Lord after 
the floud was JVimrod,thc Sonne of CV//$,diftinguiflied 
bycj^/b/wfrom'-thereil (accordingto S. Augustine) 
in one of thefe two refpecls : either for his eminencie, 
and becaufe he was the firft of fame , and that tooke 
on him to com mand others : or el fe in that he was be- 
gotten by chufi, after his other children were alfo be- 
come Fathers ; and of a later time thenfome of his 
Grand-children and Nephewcs. Howibcuer , feeing 
OWofesm expreffe wordes calleth ^?>»>W the Sonne 
of chujh , other mens conieifures to the contraric 
ought to haue no refpeft. This Empiric of Nrmrod, both the Fathers and many 
later Writers call tyrannicall ; the fame beginning in Babel , ( which is ) confufion. 

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But it feemcth to mec that CMelanchton concerned not amiffe hereof: the fame ex- 
polition being alfo made by the Authour of that worke called Onomasiicum iheole- 
gium, who affirmes that Nmrod was therefore called Amarus Bominator, A bitter or 
feuere Gouernour , becaufe his forme of rule fecmedat firftfarre more terrible then 
Patcrnall authoritic. And therefore is he 'mKhk^^laifQcMeda mi^ktehmcr : 
becauic-he tookc and deftroied both beafts and thceucjv. But S. ^yfagitftine vnder- 
ftands it otherwife, and conuerts the word (ante) by ( centra) nSirmmz therein, that 
Nimrod was a mightie hunter againft God , Sic ergo mtelligcndm eft Gigasjlk, venator 
contra Damnum , So is that Giant to be vnderftood a hunter againft the Lord. Bu t ho w- 
foeuer this word (a mightie hunter) be vnderftood; yet it rather appeareth, that as io 
Ntmradhad the command of all thofc, which went with him from the Eaft into Shi- 
naar : fo, this charge was rather giuen him, then by him vfurped. For it is no where 
found that iV^himfelfe, or any of theSonnes of his owne body came with this 
troupe into Babylonia : no mention at all being made of Noah ( the yeares of his life 
excepted) in the fucceeding Storie of the Hebrewes : nor that Sem was in this difo- 
bedient troupe, or among the builders of Babel. 

The fame is alfo confirmed by diuers ancient Hiftorians, that Njmrod, Suphne, 
-and loBan were the Captaines and leaders ofall thofe which came from the Eaft! 
And though Sem came not himfclfe fo farre We& as Shinaar (hislotbeinocafton 
the Eaft parts) yet from his fonnes Nephew Heber , the name and nation ofthe He- ao 
brcwes (according to thegencrall opinion) tooke beginning, who inhabited the 
Southermoft parts of chaldaa about the Citie of Vr; from whence Abraham was by 
'God called intocharran, and thence into Canaan. 

And becaufe thole ofthe race of Sem which came into chaldaawevc no partners 
in the vnbcleeuing workc ofthe Tower : therefore (as many ofthe Fathers conjec- 
ture) did they retaine the firft and moft ancient language, which the Fathers ofthe 
firft Age had left to Noah; and Noah to Sem and his iffues. Infamilia H e b e s. reman- 
fit h*c lingua, In the family of H e b e & this language remained (iaithS. Auguftine out of 
Epiphanius;) and this language Abrahams fed : yea it was anciently and before the 
floud thegencrall fpeech: and therefore firftcalled (faith Cceleftinus) linguahumana: 30 
the humane tongue. 

We know that GoropiusBecanut following Theadoret , Rabbi Mofes, ^£gyptius, \yer- 
gara, and others, is ofan other opinion; but how/beuer we determine of this point, 
we may with good probabilitie refolue , that none of the godly feede of Sem were 
the chiefc leaders of this prefumptuous multitude. And feeing it is not likely but 
that fome one was by order appointed for this charge, we may imagine that Ntmrod 
rather had it by iuft authoritie, then by violence ofvfurpation. 



Aug. i' C 'ait, 
T>ci.l.6.c.u. 



f II. 

That N 1 h r. o d, B e l v s, and N 1 n v s were three difttntt per fans. 



4° 



DcCiu'a.Oei. 




E n z o, and out of him Nauderm with others make many Nimrods, 
j Eufcbtus confounds him with Belus; and fo doth S. Hierome vpon ofe : 
, and thefe words of S. ^Auguftine foeme to make him ofthe fame opi- 1 
\ nion. ibi autem N 1 n v s regnabat paft mortem patris fui But, auipri- * 
• mus illkregnauerat <5y. annos; There didNiNVs raigne after the death 
of his father B e l v s,who firft gouernedin Babylon fixtie fiue yeares. But it could not 
be vnknowne to S. Auguftine, that Nimrodwas the eftablilher of that Empire : Ma- 
fes being plaine and direct therein. For the beginning ofNiMxons Kingdome (faith 50 
bejwas B a b e l, E ble c, A cc a v,andC hain e,*» the land afshinaar: Wherefore 
Nmrod was the firft King of Babel. And certaincly it beft agreeth with reafon, that 
Nmus was the third, and not one with Ntmrod, as CMercator ('led by clement) fuppo- 
fed: for in Nwustime the world was marueiloufly replenilhed. And if S. Auguftine 

had 






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is not likely but 
jnethatAfww 



firfim- 



Ch ap.io.^.2. fl/f^e Hiflorie of the World. 



187 



had vndoubtcdly taken &&fe for Mmrad,he would haue giucn him the name which 
the Scriptures gme him, rather then haue borrowed any thing out of prophane Au- 
thors. And for thofe words of S. Augujhne (qmprimm illic regmuerat , Who was the 
firjl that ratgned 'there) fuppofed to be meant by Belits : thofe word s doc not d ifproue 
that Njynrodv/&s the founder of the Babylonian Empire. Foralthough Julius Ca f ar 
. ouerthrcw the libertie of the Romane Commonwealth, making himfelfe a perpetu- 
ail Dictator , yet Augufius was tSenrft eftablifhed Emperour : and the firft that raig- 
ncd abfolutely by fbueraigne authoritie ouerthe Romanes, as an Emperour. The 
like may be laid of Nimrod, thathe firft brake the rule of Elderfhipand paternitic, 
io laying the foundation of foucraigneruie, as Ca/ar did; and yet Belus was the firft' 
who peaceablyjand with a gcnerall allowance exercifed fuch a power. 1'ererius is of 
opinion , that Belus and Ntmrod were the fame , becaule many thinges are /aid of 
them both agreeing in time : for it was about 1 oo.yearcs after the floud (as they ac- 
count) that £<?/«» raigned : but fuch agreement of times proues it not. For lb Edward 
the third, and his grand-child Richard thefecond, were Kings both in oneyeare .- the 
one dyed ; the other in the lame years was crowned King. 

And yet the opinion (that Nimrod and Belus were one ) is farre more probable 
then that of Mercator^ who makes ife««andiV?»;Wtobetheiame. Foritisplaine 
that the beginning of Nimrods Kingdome was Babel*, and the Townes adioyning r 
10 but the firft and moft famous worke of Ninus was the Cittic ofNiniuc;. 

Now whereas i».J/«^affirmeth that Ninus ouercame and fuppreft the Babylo- 
nians, the fame rather proueth thecontrarie, then that Ninus and Nimrod were one 
perfbn. For Ninus eftablifhed the feate of his Empire at Niniue'm ^Affyria , whence 
the Babylonians might (perchance) in difdaine thereof fall from his obedience^ 
whom he recouered againe by ftrong-hand ; which was ca[ie,Babjlon being not wal- 
led till Semiramis time. 



30 



•Dicitur altam 



Coclilibus muris cinxijje S e m i e. a m i s Vrbem. 
S e m 1 k a si 1 s with wals of bricke the Cittie did indole. 



Further where it is allcaged , that as the Scriptures call Nimrod mightie : & Iufiine 
hath the fame of Ninus, which is one of CAiercators arguments ; It may be anfwered, 
that fuch an addition might haue beene giuert to many other Kings afwcll. For if 
we may belecue /*/?«&?, then were Vexoris King oi~v£gypt, and Tends of Scythia 
mightie Kings before Ninus was borne. And if we may compare the wordes of Mo- 
fcs (touching Nimrod) with the vndertakings of Ninus, there will be found great dif- 
ference betwecne them. For whereas c^ra/wconceiueth, that it was too early 

40 for any that liued about the time ofthe confufion of languages,to haucinuaded and 
mattered thole Cittics Co farre remoued from Babel, namely Erec, Accad,and chalne : 
which worke he therefore afcribeth to Ninus , as a man of the greateft vndertaking ; 
and confequently would haue Ntmrod to haue beene long after the time > in which 
we fuppofe he flourifhed ; and both thofe names of Njmrodand Ninus to belong to 
. one perfbn, to wit, to Ninus .- to thefe thinges to make fbme anfwere. Firft,I doe not 
finde that fiippofition true , That euer Nimrod inuaded any of thefe Citties ; but 
that hce founded them and built them from the ground , being the firft after the 
floud , that conducted the children of iVfca&into thofe parts • and therefore had no- 
thing built or erected to his hands. 

50 Befides , whereas thefe Citties in many mens opiniohsare found to ftandfarrea- 
way from Babylon, I finde noreafon to bring m'c to that beleefe. The Cittie of Ac- 
cad which the Septuagint cals Orchard, and Epiphanius Arphal ; Junius takes to be Ni- 
fibis'mCMefopoUmia: for the Region thereabout the Cofmogrephers (faith he) call 
Accabene for Accadene. Others vnderftand Nifibiswd Njniue to bee one Cittie : fb 

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C6;VS.i 



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The fir jl "Boo^e of the fir fl part 



Chap. io.^ 



* 



la 



doeJVr^and Stephanas confound it with Chatrmi, butallmiftaken. FovA'ifibis 
Accad,and charran are diftincl places. Though I cannot dcnie ^taz^#i? to be a Re- 
gion ofCMefipotamia, the fame which ^/,w Montana out of S.Hieremecah Achad: 
and fb doe the Hebrewes alio call Wj/ibis, which feemeth to be the caufe of this mi- 
ftaking. As for the Cittie of Erec, which the Septuagintcall Orech, S.AugufincOre", 
and Pagninu-s Erec , this place i/wwss vndcrftands for Aracca in Sufiana; but there is 
alfb a Cittie in Comagena called \_slrace : and incteedclikelibood of name is no cer- 
taine proofe, without the affiftance of other circumffances. 

Concerning the third Cittie (called chalneh) /bme take it forCalmifs : of which 
Am.Marcellmus. SMierome takes it for Seleucia;HierofolymitanusfoxCtefiphon : others 
doe thinkeit to be the ^Agrani vpon Euphrates, deftroyed and razed by the Perfians. 
But let -Mi>/« be the Moderator and Iudgeofthis difpute, who tcacheth vs direcily, 
thatthefe Citties are not feated in fo diuers and diftant Regions ; forthefebehis 
wordes. And the beginning of his Kingdome (fpeaking of Nimrod) WMBabel, Erech, 
Accad, and Chalneh, in the Undofshinaar : fo as in this Valley of Shinaar, or Babylonia, 
or Chald&a (being all one) we mull finde them. And therefore I could (rather of the 
two) thinke with Viterbtenfs, that thefe foure made but one Babylon, then that they 
were Citties farrc remoued , and in feuerall Prouinces , did not the Prophet Amos 
precifely diftinguifh Chalne from Babylon. Goe you. (faith Amos) to chalne, and 
fiomthence goe youto Hamath , andthentoGathofthcPhiliJlims. ThcGf»«Mtranfla- io 
tion fauouring the former opinion, to let thefe Citties out ofshwaar, hath a margi- 
■nall note expreffing that Shtnaar was here named : not that all thefe Citties were 
therein feated, but to difhnguim Babylon of Chaldxa , from Babylon in *j£gypt ; but I 
Jinde little fiibftance in that conceit. For fure I am,that in the beginning of Nimrods 
Empire there was no fuch Babylon, norany Cittieatall to be found in ^.^:- 2?,?/^. 
Ion of zAZgypt being all one with the great Cittie of Cairo, which was built lona after, 
not farre from the place where flood CWemphis the ancient Cittic,but not fo ancient 
as Babylon vpon Euphrates. Now that Chalne is fituate in the Valley of shinaar , it 
hath beene formerly protied in the Chapter of Paradtfe. So as for any argument 
that may be brought to the contrarie, from theremote fituation of thefe three Cit- jo 
ties from Babylon, we may continue in our opinion, That Nimrod, Belus, and Ninas, 
werediftind and fucceffiue Kings. 




f III. 

That N i m k o d , not A s s v b., built <Mnine_j*: and that it is probable out ofEsw 
23.13. that Assvk built Vr of the chaldees. 

Ow as of Nimrod: fo arc the opinions of writers different touching 
Affur, and touching the beginning of that great ftate of Babylon and 4° 
Ajjyria : a controucrfie wcarifomly difputed without any dirccl 
proofe, conclufion, or certaintie. But to me (ofwhome, where the 
Scripturesare filent^the ypice of reafon hath the beft hearing ) the 
•interpretation of lumw is moft agreeable ; who befidesall ueceffuyconfetjuencc 
doth not difioynethefenfeofthe Scriptures therein, norconfufethe vnderftanding 
•thereof Forin this fort he conuerteth the Hebrew Text. Eratemm principiumre- 
gmeius Babel, & Erech, & Accad, & Chalneh, in terra Shinaaris; i terra hoc procefit in 
■djjyriam vbi tdificauit Nimuen : (which is) For the beginning of this -Idngdame mis Bit- • 
bel,and Erech , and Accad , andcbalncb,inthehndofshinaar:andheewentforthofthis 
Uni i nt0 4jfyna, and 'built Niniue. So as litmus takes -a fur in this,pjace, notforany 50 
perfon, but forrhe Region oU/yrid.- thcland being fo called in Mofcs time, and bc- 
M«t.Forcmainlytlip(icrconllraaion, (where the word (Affur) is taken for 

Th R T nC 0iSem) d0th noC anfwer the ordcr which Mo I es °bferueth through 
au ttie bookes of Gencfis, but is quite contrarie vmo it. For in the beginning of the 

tenth 



CtbtM 



H 




*H PftK. 

JbatthS 

nj "icisno ccr . 

ft* 8 ***. 

hcth vsdircftl y 

^rthcfebehis 

*,or Bdyl mi) 

«J (rathtrofthe 
i^cn that they 
; Prophet ^iws 
) '» Cialgf , ,» !( J 

^, hathamargi- 
We Gttieswere 

l/lt^|//;butl 

nningofifeW* 
miA*yft:Bdy 
! built long after, 
>ut not fo ancient 
cy of Shiiuff,\t 
ot any argument 
rf thefe three Cit-]o 
ndAta, 



UmtfiW 



diffecenttoBchmg 

ft* 

JO" 






fffl* 



k/< 



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5ft 



Chap.io.^.^ oftheHiJiorieoftbe JVorU. 



i8c? 



tenth Chapter he fetteth downc the Sonnes of l^ozhin thefe wordes. Nmpfbefoj> 
are the Generations of the Sonnes of V* o a h : S £ M, H a m, W Ispheth, %-nto whom 
Sonnesivere borve after thefeud: thenhfolloweth immediately. The Sonnes of I a- 
i> h e t h nr>r Comer, ©-«•. fo as lapheth a laft named among Noahs ibnnes,bee hee 
eld eft or youngeft : becaufe he was iirft to be fpoken of: with whom ( hauing laft 
named him) hee proceeds and fets downe his iffue, and then the iffue of his fonnes : 
firft, the iffue of Gomer^ lapheths cldeft fonne; and then fpeakes oilman and his 
fonnes : for of the reft of that familicheeisfilcnt. Anon after hee numbreth the 
Sonnes of Ham, of which Crifh was the eldcft : and then the fonnes of Cufh and UVBx* 
I o raim ; and afterward of Canaan ; leaning Shem for the laft, becaufe he would not dif : 
ioyne the Storie of the Hcbrewes. But after he beginneth with Semlie continueth 
from thence by Arphaxad i Shela, and Heber, vnto Abraham ^ and fo to Iacob, and th e 



Fathers of that Nation. But to haue brought in one of the Sonnes of Sh 



bemmtne 



middle of the generations of Ham , had beene againft order ; neither would CMofes 
haue paft ouer fo {lightly the erection of the Afjyrhn Empire, in one of the fonnes of 
Shem, if he had had any fuch meaning : it being the ftorie of Shems fonnes which he 
moftattended. For hee nameth iV/wWapart,after the reft of the Sonnes of Cufb, 
becaufe he founded the Babylonian and Affyrian Empire:and in theeleuenth Chapter 
he returnes to fpeake of the building of Babel in particular, hauing formerly named 

10 it in the tenth Chapter, with thole other Citties which Nimrod founded in Shinaar. 
And as hee did in the tenth Chapter , fo alfo in theeleuenth he maketh no report of 
Shem, till fuch time as he had finifhed fo much of Nimrodns he meant to touch : and 
■then he beginneth with the iffue of S hem, which hee continueth to Abraham and if 
rael. And of litmus opinion touching i^Affnr, was Caluin: to which I conceiue that 
F.Commeslor in hifloriaSchelaflica gaue an entrance , who after he had deliuered this 
place in fome other fenfo, he vfeth thefe wordes. Vel intclligendum non eft de Assvr 
ftlio S e m, &c. fed Assvr (id est) Regnum Afyriorum inde egreffum est,quodtempore 
S A r v g p-oaui A b r a h a m i faclum eft, (which is) Or elfe it is not to be 'vnderftood of 
Assvr. the Sonne ofStM, drc. but A s s v r ( that is the Kingdome of the Affyrians) 

50 camefromtheme(videlicetfromBabylon)orwasmadeoutofit i which happened 'in the_j 
time ofShKvothe great grand-father ^Abraham. After which he reconcileth 
the differences in this fort : If you take the ancient Beltts ( meaning Tjfmrod) to bee 
the firft erector of the Affyrian Empire, or the firft Founder thereof, it is true qaan- 
tumad initium,reffec7ing the beginning ; but others conceiue that it had beginning 
from Ninut, which is alfo true quantum adregm ampliationcm , regarding the enlarge- 
ment of the Empire. To this I may adde the opinion of Epiphaniiu , confirmed by 
Cedrenm, who takes A (fur to be the forme of ifmrod : and fo doth Methodius , and 
Viterbienfis, S. Hieromcmd Cyri/ius , and now laftly Torniellm : who faith hee tooke 
vpon him that name of Affitr after he had beaten the affyrians, as Scipio did of A- far. in Ges.ic 

4o fricantu after his conqueft in Afitca:and that Affitr was a common name to the Kings 
of Affyria, as itappearcth by many Scriptures, as Pfalme 8 r. Efay lo.ofe ^.efrc. but 
to helpe the matter he makes Mmrodof the race of Shem , and the fonne of Irari. 
But Rabanus Mauriis, who was Arch-Bifhop of Mentz- in theyeare of chrift 854. an 
ancientand learned writer, vnderftands this place with Commeftor, or Commeftor 
with him, agreeing in fubftance with that tranflation of Iunitts : to which wordes of 
(Jl-fofes he giueth this fenfe. Dehac terra Affyriorumpullulauit imperittm,qtti ex nomine 
Nini,Bei. 17%, Nintim condiderunt^rbem magnam, (jrt. Out of this land grew the 
Empire of the Affyrians, who built Ninus the great Citiie, fo named »/Ninvs the fonne 
of Bel v s. On the contrarie Calmn obiedfeth this place of Efay. Behold the land of „ „ 

J O the Chaldeans, this was no people, Assvr founded it by the inhabitants of the wilderneffc; 
then which there is no one place in the Scriptures that hathagreaterdiuerfitiein 
the tranflation and vnderftanding; infomuch as (Jiiichael de Palafio vpon Efay . 
(though in all elfe very diligent) pafTcth it ouer. But Caluin fcemeth hereby to in- 
ferre, that becau fe AJfhr founded the ftate of the chaldxans , therefore al fo Affitr ra- 
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thcr then A7;»r<^cftablilhed the Ajfyrim Empire, and built Nimue : contrarie to the 
former tranflation of Junius, and to his owne opinion. No w out of the Vulgar, {qA- 
led/#«ww«tranflation) it may bee gathered that Afur both founded and ruined 
this eftatc or Cittic ofthc chaldxans, byEfay remembred : vnto which Cittie,people 
orftate, hee plainly tcllerh the Tyrians that they cannot truft, orhopeforreliefe 
thence. Or rather it maybe taken.that the Prophet maketh this Cittie oichddtA, 
and that eftatc, an example vnto thofe Phmmaans , whom in this place hee forc-tcl- 
leth of their ruine : which Cittie of chaldxa being of ftrength , and carefully defen- 
ded, was (notwithftanding) by the Affynans vtterly wafted and deftroyed : where- 
by hegiueth them knowledge, and fbretelleth them, that their owne Cittie of Tyre, JO 
(inuinciblc, as themfelues thought) mould alfb /bone after bee ouertumed by the 
fame Affynans : as (indeede) it was by Nabuchodonofor. And thefe be the words af- 
ter Hieromo. EccetermChdd&orum,talispoptdusmn fuit , Assvn.fundauiteam, in 
captiuitatem traduxerunt robujios eius ,fuffoderunt domos eius , pofuerunt earn in rttimtm, 
(whkhis) Beholdthelandof the Chaldeans, filch a people there were not (or thiswasno 
pc0ple,aftcrtheGeneuaJ As svr. (or the Affynans) founded d,they carriedamy their 
ftrongmen captiue, they vndermined their houfes, and rmned their Citties. The Septua- 
gint exprefTe it but in a part of another Verfe , in thefe wordes. Et in terra chald&o- 
rum,& h<ec defolata eft ab Affyri/s, quoniam murus eius corruit, making the ienfe perfect 
by the preceding Verfe, which all together may be thus vndcrftood. Jfthougoeouer 2© 
to Chittim (which is C\€acedon or Greece) yet thou Jhdt haue no reft , (fpeaking to the 
Tyrians) neither in the land of the Chaldeans , for this is made de folate by the Affynans, be- 
caufe their walks fell together to the ground. Pagninus and Vatablm conuert it thus. 
Ecce terra chafdijm , ifte populusnon erat illtc ohm i nam A s s v nfundauit earn nauibus, 
crexeruntarcesillius, contriuerunt xdes eius, pofutt earn in ruinam /which may bee thus 
Englifhed. Behold the land of the Chaldeans, this peoplewas not once therein inhabiting : 
for As svR.built>taharbourforfiips,tbeyerec7edtheTowersthereof,andagainebrak(L_j' 
downethe houfesthereofandruinatedit, lunius'm the place of fhips fets the word (pro 
Barbaris) that is, for the Barbarians .-and the Geneua, by the Barbarians. Butthisisvn- 
doubted that the Prophet Efay (as may be gathered by all the fenfe ofthc chapter) 5© 
didthercinauurethe7>m»joftheirfuturedeftruction, which (accordingly) fell 
on them : wherein (for the more terrour) hee maketh choice to note the calamities 
of thofe places, Citties, and Regions, by whole Trade the ftateandgreatneffeof 
the Tyrians was maintained ; as by the Cilicmns from Tharfis ; from the ^Macedonians, 
and other Grecians vnder the name ofCittim ; alio by the ^Egyptians, the chaldxans] 
and the reft. TorTyre was then the MartTowne of the world moft renowned! 
And (as it appearcs in our difcom fe of Paradi/e) not the leaft part of her chiefe mer- 
chandize came in by the Cittie Vr or Vrchoa in chaldea, where the body or chiefe 
ftreame 0$ Euphrates ( euen that ftreamc which runneth through Babylon and Otris, 
which now falleth into Tigrisjhzd his paffige into the Perfian Gulfed : though now' 4 3 
it be flopped vp. For (as we haue heretofore noted) the Arabians (thatdefcended 
from Sheba and Raamah) dwelling on theEaft bankes of the Perfian Gulfe_j „ trading 
with the Tyrkns (as thofe of Eden, charran, and Chalne did) tranfported their mcr- 
chandife by the mouth of Tigris, that is, from Teredon, and ofEupbrates,thax is.from 
Vr ox Vrchoa : and-th en by Baby lon,md thence by Riuer and ouer Land they conuey- 
cd it into Syria, and fo to Tyre : as they doe this day to ^Aleppo. So then Vr of the 
Chaldeeswas a PortTowne, and one of thofe Citties which had intelligence, trade, 
and exchange with the Tyrians : for it flood by the great Lakes of chald&a , through 
which that part o f Euphrates mnnc, which paflageis now ftopt vp. Eius curfumvetu- 
Jiasaboleuit (faithNiGER.) AndPlmie, locus vbiEuphratis ostium fuit,flumenfalfum, 53 
TwthathworneavtaythechxnneUofEuphrates^ndtheplacewherethcmouththcreof-was 
isaBayoffaltwater. Thefe thinges being thus, certainly (not without good proba- 
bility) wee may expound the Cittie of thcChaldees, whofecalamities£/^hereno- 
tem tor terrour ofthc Tyrians, to be the Cittie anciently called Vr ; and (by Hecatms) 

Camerina ; 



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Camerma ; by Ptolomie Vrchoa : and by the Greeks ckdd&ofolis, TheCittie ofchaldxa ': 
which the Sonnes of S hem vntill Abrahams time inhabited. And whereas in all 
the Tranflations it is laid, that 4^/w bdth founded it and ruined it ; it may bee yn- 
derftoodj that <^Jfitr th e Founder was the fonne of S hem • and Affitr the deitroiers 
were rhc Afyrians,by whom thofe that inhabited Vr.ofchaldsa, were at length op- 
preffed and brought to ruine: which thing God fore-feeing commanded Abraham 
thence to Charran, and fb into Canaan. And if the Hebrew word by p'atablm and 
Vagmms conucrted ( by /hips ) doe bearc that fenfc , the fame may be the better ap- 
proved ; becaufc it was a Port Towne : and the Riuer fo farre vp as this Cittie of 
to Vr was in ancient time nauigable, as both byPlinieand .Mrgwappcareth. Andifthe 
word (for the Barbarians) or (by the Barbarians) be alio iri the Hebrew Text it is no 
lcflcmanifefti that the moft barbarous ^Arabians of the Defert were and are the 
confronting, and next people of all other vnto it. For Chddaa is now called <_xfrvr- 
chddar, which lignifieth defcrt lands , becaufe itioyneth to that part of .^Arabia fo 
called : and Cicero (calling thofe Arabians by the name of Itur -&ans) addeth that they 
. are of all other people the moft fa luage ; calling them homines omnium maxirne. 
barbaros. 

So as thisplace bfEfay, which breedeth fofne doubt in Caluin, prouethinno- 
thmg the contrarie opinion, norin any part wcakeneth the former translation of/*- 
20 «aw j nor the interpretation of Comestor and Rabams. For though other men hauc 
not concerned (for any thing that I haue read) that Affurh in this place diuerily ta- 
ken (as for the fonne o?Sem, when he is fpoken of as a builder of Vr ; and when as a 
deftroyer thereof , then for the Afyrun Nation ) yet certainly the euidence of the. 
truth, and agreement of circumftances feeme to enforce it. And fo this founding of 
theCittie of the chalde es by Ajjur (into which the moft of the poftcritic of Sam 
that came into Shinaar, and were feparate for the Idolatrie of the chufites and Nim- 
rodians, retyred themfelues) hath nothing in it to proue that the fame A fur built 
Niniue, or that the fame A fur was all one with Nmus ; except wee will make Affur,. 
• who was the fonne of shem, both an Idolater^ and the fonne of Belus. For ( out of 
j'o doukfe^gw^a s thefirft not orious facrificcr to Idols ; & the firft that fet vp .1 statu? ._ 
to be honouregLas-God, Nowif^aP muftbeeof that race7 and not ofthefamilie" 
of <SVw»,as hemuftbe if he founded limine, then all thofe which feeke to giue him 
the honour thereof, doe him by a thoufand parts more iniuric, by taking from him 
his true Parent and Religion. 

Befides, if thisfuppofed AjSkr whom they make the Sounder of Niniue (and fo 
the fonne of Belus) were any other, and not the fame with Nmus ; then what became 
of him? Certainly hewasvery vnworthyandobfeure, andnotliketobethcFoun- 
der of fuch an Empire and fuch a Cittie, ifnomanhauevouchfafedtoleauctopo- 
fteritie his expuliion thence, and how he loft that Empire againe or quitted it to Ni- 
40 »/«.-whofeacts and conqiicfts are folargely written, and (according to my appre- 
hcnfion) farre differing from truth, ft will therefore bee found beft agreeing to 
Scripture and to Realoh, and beft agreeing with the ftorie of that age written by 
prophaneAuthours, faatNimrodfoundedBabcl,Erech,zndAccad, andcbalne, the 
firft workes and beginnings of hisT£mpirc,according to Mofe's, and that theft works 
being hnifhed within the Valley of Shinaar, hec looked farther abrode, andfttin 
hand the workc of Ninas , lying ncarc vnto the fameftreame that Babel and chalne 
did : which workc his grand-child Nmus afterward amplified and fini (hcd,as Semira- 
mis (this Ninus his wife) did Babylon. Hence it came to paffe , that as Semiramis was 
counted the Foundrefle ofthe Cittie which fhee only finished : fo alfb Nintts of Ni- 
50 nine. Quam quidem Babylonem potttit inflaurare , Shce might repair e or renew Babylon, 
faith S.Au^uftine. For fo did Nabuchodonofor vaunt himfelfe to be the Founder of 
Babylon al fo, becaufc he built vp againe fome part of the wall oucrborne by the furie 
ofthe Riuer : which workeof his ftood till Alexanderstivae, whereupon he vaunted 
thus . Is not this great Babel which 1 haue built ? 



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O/V/tf acls »/Nim8.od a»,s? B e l v s , asfarre as now they 
are knownz_j, 

Vt to returnc to the ftoric, it is plaine in <J\iofes, that Kimrod (whom 
Philo interpreteth transfugium • and Julius ^friemm furnamed Sa- 
turne) was the cftablifhcr ofthc Babylonian Monarchies whom, there 
is no other thing written, then that his Empire in the beginning ton- 
lifted of thofe foure Citties before remembred ,Babel, Eric, Acted, and ro 
Chalne : and that from hence he propagated his Empire into Afffrid ; and in Afiyria. 
built fbure more Citties (to wit) Nmitle, Behoboth, Celah, and Be/en. Andfeeing 
that he fpent much time in building Babel it felfe and thofe adioyning, and thathis 
trauailesweremanyerehecameintoJ^^.-thatworkeof^W (fuch ask was) 
with the other three Citties, and the large foundation of Ninitte_j , and the Other 
Citties of^^wwhichhebuilded (conlidercd with the want of materials, and 
with other impediments) were of greater difficultie then any thing performed by 
his fucceflburs in many yeares after : to whofe vndertakings time had giuen fo great 
an increafe of people; andtheexamplesandpatterncs of his beginning fo great an 
aduancement and encouragement: in whofe time (faith Glycas J all thefe Nations 20 
were cal led (JUeropes, k fermenis lingnarum terrafy dhuf/one y By reafon that the earth and 
thefpeech were then diutded. 

Belus, or Bel, or lufiter Belus, fiicceedcd Nimrod, after he had raigned 1 1 4-yeares ; 
of whofe acts and vndertakings there is little written. Font is thought that he fpent 
much of his time in difburdening the low lands of Babylon , and drying and making 
firme ground of all thole great Fennes and ouerflowne Marilhcs which adioyncd 
vntoit. For anyofnis warrcs or conquefts there is no report, other then of his be- 
gunne enterprife againft Sabatms King of -Armenia, and thofe parts oiScythia which 
Berofus ca\s ScythiaSaga, whofe Sonne and SuccefTourA^M/wbcramcfubiccland 
Tributarie to Ninas, thatfolfowed the warre to effect, which was by his Father Be- 3 
Im begunne. 



*. v. 

That wee are not to mernailehow fo many Kingdomes could bee erec~tedabout 

thefe times: and of \ n x or. 1 s of ^Aigypt, and Tanais. 

of Scythia. 

P^|||2|> Hat fo manyKingdomes were erected in all thofe Eafterne parts of 

" ) theworIdfofboneafteriVz»?rfl4(asbytheftorieofiVw^ismadema- , 
nifeft) the caufes were threefold; (namely) Opportunitie, Example, 
and Ncceffitie. For Opportunitie being a Princeffe liberal! and • 
powerfull beftoweth on'her firft entertainers many times more bene- 
fits, then either Fortune can, or Wifedome ought ; by whofe prcfincc alone the vn- 
derftanding minds ofmenrecciuc all thofe helps and fupplies , which they either 
want or wifh for : fb as euery leader of a troupe (after the diuifion of tongues and 
difperfion of people) finding thefe faire offers made vnto them, held the power 
which they poflcft, and goucrned by difc retion all thofe people , whom they con- ■ 
ducted to their deftined places. For it cannot be concciued, that when the Earth 
was firft diuided,mankindeuraggledabroade likebeaftsinaDcfert; but that by a- p 
greementthey difpofed thcmfelues, and vndertookc toinhabite all the knownc 
parts ofthc world, and fay diftihagamHiesand Nations • ot hprwifr thnferpmnrq 
Regions from Babylon and Shtnaar, which had Kings, and were peopled in ^inm 
rime, would not hauc becne poffeftinmany hundreds of yeares after, as then they 

were ; 



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t were • neither did thofe that were fent, and trauailed farre off (or.der being the true 
' parent of prosperous fuccelTe) yndcrtake fo difficult enterprises without a Condu-' 
cter or Commander. Secondly, the Example of Nimrod with whom it Succeeded 
well , Strengthened eucry humour that aSpired. Thirdly, Neceffirie reSblued all 
men by the arguments of common mifenes, that without a Commander and Magi- 
strate, neither could thofe that were laborious, and of honeft difpo!irions,enioy the 
barueft of their owne trauailes : nor thoSe which were of little Strength, Secure 
thcmfelues agairift forcible violence : nor thofe which fought after any proportion 
of greatneSTe,cither pofleflethe Same in quiet,or rule and order their owne ministers 
i and attendants. 

That thefecauSes had wrought thefe effects, thevndertakings and conquefts of 
Njnus (the Sonne of Belm) made it apparent : tor he round cuery where Kings and 
Monarches, what way foeuerhis Ambition led him in the w.trrcs. 

But Nimrod (his grand-father) hacfrio companion King, to vs knowne , when he 
firft tooke on him fbueraignetie and fblecommandement of all thofe the children' 
of Noah, which came from the Eaft into Babylonia : though in his life time others 
alio raifedthemfelues to the fame eftate; of which hereafter. Belus (hisfonneand 
fucccflbur) found Sabaiius King of Armenia and Scphiafutficicmly powerfull to re- 
fiSf his attempts : which Sabatiw I take to be the Same , which lujline ,cz\s Tanais ■ 
20 and Should conjecture, that Mizraim had beene his Vexoris, were it not that I vehe- 
mently iufpect fome errour, (as Iufline placeth him) in the time of that Vexoris, vAio 
by many circumstances feemes to me rightly accounted by the iudicious and lear- 
ned Remeccius all one with the great Sefostris, that liued certaine ages after Ninas. 
This Belus,the fecond King of Ai^/w.raigned 65 . yeares,according to the common 
account, 



,0H 



See more of 
this, /.i.ofthii- 
firft Pare. ci, 
§.S. 



$• VI. 

of the name of'B e l v s , and other names affne 'unto it. 

j|^ Hence this fecond King and SuccelTour of Nimrod had the name of 
"J Bel, or Belus , question hath beene made : for it feemeth rather a name 
■ impojfed, or (of addition) giuenby Nmus t then aflumed by Belus 
himielfe. 
Cyrillus againSt Mian cals the Father of Ninus Arbelus, affirming 
that he was the firft of all men that cauSed himfelfe to be called a God : which were 
it fo, then might the name of Belus be thence deriued. But Bellas many learned wri- 
ters haue obferued, fignirieth the Sunne in the chaldnan tongue ; and therefore did 




Nmus and Semkamis gme that name to their Father, that hee might be honoured as 
40 the Sunne, which theS^/jwwwworfhipped as a God. And as this title was afTu-, 
med in after-times by diuers others of the Chaldxan Princes, and Babylonian Satrap* : 
fo was it'vfed (in imitation) by the chiefeof the Carthaginians and other Nations,as 
ibme Historians haue concerned. 

To this Bel, or Belus, pertaine (as in affinitie) thofe voices of Baal,Baalim,Belphegor; 
Beelphagor,Belfebub, and Beclfephon. Thofe that are learned in the Hebrew and Chd- 
dadn conuert the word Bad by the Latine Princepsmilitid,chiefe in the warre, though 
Daniel 'was So called (faith Svidas) ob honor em explications arcanarum rerum , In 
honour of his expounding fecrets. S.Hierome makes Bel, Beel,a.nd Baal,to haue the Same 
Signification : and faith, that the Idoll of Babylon was So called , which Nmus in me- 
jo morieofhis Father Set vp to be worshipped : to which that he might adde the more 
honourandrcuerence,hemadeita Sanctuarie and refuge forall offendors. Hence 
(faith Lyranns) came Idplatrie, and the firft vSe of Images into the world. lfidore^> L , - m r a - n 
doth interpreted/ hyVetus,o\& or ancient ; adding, thatas among the Ajjyrians it is kfa*. *.u! 
taken for Saturne and the Sunne: fo in the Punick or Carthaginian lanauageitfignifi- ; ^ 8 - c -' 5 ? 

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' cthGod. G/jwmakesit an Ajjyrimmwas properly, j. andJ^^^aT/mw. He al- 
io affirmeth that th e Idoll which the Moabites worlhippcd ^by them erected on the ' 
mountaine Phegor, or Pear, and called &m/J is the fame which the Latin.es call Pria- 

BiemMofe* fm , the God of Gardens; which was alio theopinion of S. Hierome. But that the 

ca<& }■ word Be!., or Bee!, was as much to lay as God , appeareth by the word Beelzebub , the 

Idoll of Accaron. ¥ or Bel, or S^/foundcth (God) and Sebub (Flies or Hornets .- ) by 
which name (notwithftanding) the /«v« expreffe the Prince of Dcuils. But the 
Prophet ofe teachcth vs the proper iignification of this word from the voice of God 
himfclfe; And at that day (fith the Lord) thou Jhalt call me Ism, audfalt call me no 
more Bh \LiM:farIw>iu't<tkeawiiy'theiiameofB aalim outoftheirmouthes.T-ornl- 10 
though the name of Bad, or Babal, be iuftly to be vied towards God; yet in refpect 
that the fame was giuen to Idols^God both hated it and forbad it. And the viing of 
the word Be! among the Chddlans for the Sunne, was not becjufc it properly figni- 
fieth the Sunne, but becaufe the Sunne there was worihipped as a God : as alio the ■ 
Fire was, tanqmm Soils particda. As for the wordes compounded ( before remem- 
bred) as Belphegor, and Bclfephori ; Bel/ephon is expounded out of F a g i v s, Dominus 
fpccuh vel cufioJU, The Lord of the watch-tower or of the guard: the other word noteth 
the Idoll, and the place wherein it was worihipped. It is alio written Belpeor, or 
Baalpeor .-and Poor (they fay) isasmuchasI3«W,ri»«'; and therefore the wordioy- 
ned expreffeth a naked Image. Somethcrcarethatcallthis^/^, thefbnneof So- 10 
turne: for it was vied among the Ancients to name the Father Saturne , the Sonne 
iuR«r. ietjtit Jupiter, and the grand-child Hercules. S at.vrn i dicuntur fomiliarum Nobilitim , lic- 

'•'• gum quivrbescondiderunt fenifimi ; primogeniti eorum Ioves e£T v n o n e s ; H k r- 

c v l e s i : cro nepotes eorum fortiftmi, The ar.cientefl of Treble families , and Kings which 

form de denies, arc called Satvrnes; their firfl borne I v r 1 t e r s and Ivnoes; their 

valiant NefhewesHEKcvLEs. But this />(?/«* (faith L.Viues) was famous by reafbn 

f ' f/ ofhis warlike fbnneiV/««o', who caufed his Father to be worihipped as a God by 

■0M.I1. ^V the name of lufiter Bafalonius , whom the Egyptians (tranfported by thcdream.es 
of their anticjuitie) make one of theirs. For Neptune (fay they) vpon Libya the 
Daughter ofEpaphus begat this lupiler Belus , who was Father to lAEgyptus. They 50 
adde,that this Belus carrying a Colonic to the Riuer of Euphrates there built a Cittie, 
in which he ordained Priefts after the Egyptian manner. But were there any Belus 
the fonne ofEpaphusand ifis, or of Neptune&wd Libya,qr (with Eufebms) of Telegonus, 
who after the death of Apis married Ifis, (Cecrops then raigning in Athens) the fame 
was not this Babylonian Belus of whom we fpeake, but rather fbme other Belus, of 
. whom the Egyptians fo much vaunted. 



tfjfl'f' 



$. VII. 

Of the worfljipping of Images begunne from B e l v < 
~ m Babe!. 



40 



V 

J!trabo.LttX:$ 




S for the Babylonian Belus, he was the mo ft ancient Belus, and the In- 
ucntour of Ajlronomic,if Plmie fay true : from whence the tsEgyptuns 
might borrow both the name and the doctrine. Some part of the 
Temple , in w hich hi s statue or Image was honoured as a God, the \a7 
fame Author affirmeth that it remained in his time. 
OftheScpulcherof£f//w, J/V<^<?writeththus. Ouer the Riuer (faith he) there-J 
are gardens, where they fay the mines ofBrivshis Tombe_j, which Xerxes brakcJ * 
r vp,aveyetremaming. Itwas afqiurejPyramis made ofh~?icke_j , a furlong high ,andon <o/ 
U^tmMan. eueryfide it had afurlongin breadths It appeares by Cyril againft lulian, that hce ob- 
tained diuirieworfhip yet liuing: for fohce writes of him (calling him <^Arbelus.) 
A R b e l v s , vir fuperbus ejr arr.ogans , primus hominum "dicitur a fubdiiis Deita- 
tis nomen accepijfe : perfeuerarunt igitur Afyrij , & fimtimx illis genics facrificantes ei. 

A R b e l v i, . 










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J^.the 

'-; l) «o(God 

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Hume, the Sonne 
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l NONESjHUl- 

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ni lv noes; their 

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A R. B E L V S, <Z W,i» ■;/«- 

<•««- honoured t 
■ Affymns therefore ana tnevwmtng Rations tune per feuered , {aer ifying to him. Eucn 
i^jrms alfb, whom Smdas cals Thuras,who fucceeded next after A r inyas,\vas made an 
Idoll-God among them, if we credit Smdas. 

After Nmus (that is, after Ninyas) Thurai raigried (faith SuidasJ whom they called 
after the name of the Planet Oilars ; a man of fharpe and fierccdifpofition, who bid- 
ding battaileto Cattcafus of theftocke of lapheth iluchim. The ^rwtt worship- 
ped him for their God, and calledhim^i/ (that is) UHfyfsX thusfi.rre Smdas. Nei- 
1 o ther is it vnlikcly but that many among idolatrous Nations were Deified in their s 
Jifc-timcs, or foone after : though I denie not but that the moft of their Images and 
Status were firft creeled without diuincworfhip, only in memorie ,bT the glorious 
[QJ a foofBenet aftors, as Qhcasngfiily cofkeiueth ; ;md io afterward the Dcuill crept 
into thole wodden and brasen carcaies, when poftentic had loft the memoricof 
their firft inuention. Hereof ^nVe_^ fpcaketh in this manner. Quosautem Pacini 
JDcostiJfcriint homines fuerunt , & pxovniufcuiufiy ; vitameritis'velmagnificentia, colia- 
pud Jnos post mortcmcoepcrunt ': fed(ddmonihus perfitadentibus) qnosilli pro fuamemoria. 
honor A'.icr.mt, mineres Deosexiftmanmt : aiifta.'vero tnagis exzolentkaccefserunt Poeta- 
rum figment a, They jvere men (faith he) whom the Pagans affirmed to be Gods : andeuery 
20 one for his merits or magmficence begannc after his death to bee honoured of his ownz_j. 
But at length (the Detdls perf re tiding) they accounted them lefs'er Gods, who fa memories they 
honoured: and the fill tons of 'the Poets madethejpjnions (concerning the honours of ihe_j 
, dcadJjnuchmorcfitpcrfHtWHS. ' , 

And that the wo'rihTpping of Images was brought in by the Pagans, and Heathen 
Nations, it is not Jfidore alone that witneiTeth ; but Gregorian : Genttlttas (faith hee) Greg^ec^fkr 



im:entrix& caput eft imagimm , Geniilifmeis the inuentrefte and ground of images : and Ambn{, 
Ambrofe; Gcnteslimumadorant, tanauam imannem Dei. The Gentih ^„rr ™W .,,,/ 108. 



in pfat. 



woo a as if 



.LucX 



■were the image of God. £»_/f&0alfoaffirmethas much, andcallcth the worfhippin? EllM , 7( . 
of images acuftomebotrowed of the H eathen. .'The like hatli S. Aiiguftinev.oamtt. Att . ' c „ ' ' 
30 Adimantus. Etvereniur (faith L a c t a n t i v s> ne reltgwvana fit , Ji nihil videant ua \ 
qtwdadorent, They feari their religionwouldbevaine,fiio:ddihey notfee that which they 
worfhip. - J 

And (out ofdoubt) the Schoolemcn fhift this fearefull cuftome very ftrangelv. 
. For feeing the very workemanTETp is forbidden, how can the heart ofa wife Chrifti- 
an fatisficit felfc with the diftinftion of 'r.odut and Hyperdoulia, which can imply no- 
thing but feme difference of worihipping ofthofeimages after they are made I And, 
it is of all things the moft ftrange,why religious and learned men ifiould ftraine their 
wits to defend the vfe of thofe things, which the Scriptures hauc not only nowhere 
warranted, but cxprefly in many places forbidden,and cu'rfed the p'racf ifers thereof 
V 40 Yet this doifrinc of theDeuill was fo ftrongly and fiibtilly rooted, asneitherthe 

expreffe Commandement of God himfelfe , Thou (halt not make any graitenima^c^, XQ> 4 
nor ail the threatnings of Mtfes and the Prophetslfter him could remoue, weede it, 
orbyfeare, orbyanyperfwaiionsieadctheheartsofmen from it. Forwherefhall 
wefindewordesofgreaterweight, orofplainerinftruclionthenthcfe I Takethcre- 
f 'ore good heede to yaur fclucs (for yce Jaw no image in the day thik-tbe Lordfiakevnto 
yoitm Horcboutofthemidfioftbeftre) that yee corrupt not your felues , and make you, a 
grauen image, or repzefentation of any figures ,■ whether it be the likenefteof oflxle or 
Female. 

And befides the exprciTe Commandement, Thou/halt make thee no grauen imagt^, 

50 and the prohibition in many Scriptures , fb it is written in the booke tfwifedtmej. 

That t he inuen tion of Jdolswas tht i beginning t> fwhorcde me:andthefindiiignftU,™ t L e 

corruptio n of life -. for they were not from the beginning, neither fhtdl 'they continue 

for euer. ' 

And whereas the Schoolcmen affirme, that the Prophets fpake againft the wor- 

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lhipping of the Heathen Idols, it is manifeft that Mofes /pake of images of the li- 
ning God, and not offt«*/and the reft ofthat nature, for you/aw no image (faith M o- 
s e s) ;to ^ /to the Lordjpttke vnto you in Horeb. Surely it was excellently laid of 
^ m[\ Basil, 2^// aliquamin tile formammaginan,ne circttmfcribas ettm mente tua , Doemi^t 
tmagme my forme to be in God, les.fi thou limit or circumfcnbe him in thy mindetoo. Now ^" 
if the great Bafl thoughtit«i preemption vnlawfull to reprefent a patterne of the 
infinite God to ourjowne thoughts and mindes , how farre doe thofe mcji prcfiime 
that put him vnder thegreazie penfill ofa painter , or the ruftieaxe or other inftru- 
ment ofa Carpenter or Caruer ? 

For as this dilhonour totheinfiniteandincomprehenfibl.eGodbeg-nncinfe- 10 
bel : Co did the, 1 Deuill tranfport and fpeede this iiiuention into all the Kegions ad- Zs 
ioyning.and into v&gypt and Greece. 

The/^w4»«forawhilerefiftedthecreaionofth*cfeIdolsandimages, refilling . 
to fee them in their Temples for i 70. yearcs, obferuing therein the Law of Mima : 
who thought it kimj etie to refemb le things moft beautifull ,, b y things moft bafc. \ 
But Tarqmnim Pnfcus afterwardspreuailing", and following the vamtie of the Gr~L 
dans ( a Nation of all others vnder the Sunne moft deluded by Satlun) fet vp the 
$>c cluit.vei. images of their Gods = which ( as S c . Augufime witnefleth) that learned Varro both 
*4-<-3*- bewailed, and vtterly condemned : and which Seneca thusderideth. Simulachra 

deorum venerantur, illisfupplkant,gcnupofito Hk adorant , & cum Imc fufpiciant , fabros 1 o 
qui illafecere contemnunt , The images of the Gods are worflripped, thofe they fray vnto 
with bended knees ; thofe they adore, and while they fo greatly admire them, they con- 
temne the handi-craftfmen that made them ; which alio Sedulius the Poet in this fort 
fcoffcth at. 

Heu miferi qui vana colunt, qui cordefiniftro 
Religiofa fibt fcutfunt fmulachra,fuum£ 
Fachremfughmt^dr qua fecere verentur. 
Qms furor eft ? qud tanta animos dementialudit ? 
Vt volucrem, turpem^ bouem, toruum^ Draconem, 
Semi-hommemfy canemfupplcx homo promts adoret* 

Ah wretched they that worfhip vanities, 

And confecratc dumbe Idols in theirhearr, 

Who their owne Maker (God on high) defpife, 

And feare the worke of their owne hands'and art. 

What furie ? what great madnefle doth beguile 

Mens minds ? that man fhould vgly (Iiapes adore, • 

OfBirds,orBuls,orDragons,orthevile 

Halfe-doggc-halfc-man on knees for aide implore. , 

And though this deuife was barbarous, andfirft, and many yeares praftifed by 
Heathen Nations oncly, till the/nra were corrupted in ^£gypt,yQi it is not Seneca 
alone that laughcth to Iconic the ignorant ftupiditie of his Nation : but lujim M,<r- 
/7rremembreth how the ^/V J 'm u cighedagainft Images .• and Ho[f im.m /how So- 
/^wfe taught, that it waspernitioustothefoulcs of men toereft and adore thofe 
babies. Strabo and HerodotusmtnciTc , that the Perfians did not ereft or let vpany 
Statue of their Gods. Lycurgus neuer taught it the Lacedemonians, but thought it im- ^J 
pietie to reprefent immorta ll natur esbyjnortall figures. Eufebui-s alio wltnclreth ^ 
inhisTTxtbooke^f^r.«/^^to»^£/<4»^fl/M,thatitwasforbidden'by aLawin Serm, jo 
or among the Brachmans in India, that Images fhould be worfhipped. The fame do 
Tacitus and Crinitns report 0? the ancient G^-mwy. Many other Authors miphtbe 
remembred thanvitnefTe the difdainc which the Heathen themfelucs had of this 
childi-h Idolatrie: of which Hofimim hath writren at large in his Trad dc origins 

imaginum. 



30 



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I ** 














lhl "g s mo(lbafr, x 
""ie.oftheGnfc 

\carr.cd»:ir»-«both 

« /«//>!«, /<([« 10 

tljo/alityprayvnti) 
mretkem, they an- 

k to in this fort 



; ;:. 



<* lon «hov> v " 









>'<^ 



•A' ; 









i^ CU 



4 



Chap.io.^./, 0/^ Htjlone of the World. 



i 97 



l 









W" -net- 






10 



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to-V 



maginum. And it was truly faid, Omnia mdae xcmpla boms mtus oria funt All ill ex 
ampksbauefyrungfi-omgood beginnings. thcHe;ithciiatrlrftmadeth^'/4«"-.nd 
Images, butmmemoricoffuch remarkable men,as had defcruedbcftoftheircoun 
pries and commonwealthes ; Efftgtes hommum ( faith Pknie ) non foUbant exprimi nifi 

ahquaillnjlrieaufaperpetmtatem?nerentiU7n:Menwerenotvonttomakcpiamcs but of 
memvljich ''merited for form notable ■eauje to be perpetually remembred. And tho'Vh of 
the more ancient Papijles, fome haue borrowed of the Gentiles ( as appeareth in La: 
clantms) that defence for lm^%^iJMsimulachriias:cproelementisliterarum,vtper 
ea difecrent homines I>eum imufibilem cognofcere : Images ( lay th ey , an d fo before them 
the Heathen laid) are in pad of letters , whereby men might learne to know the inuf- 
jibleGod: in which ynderftanding (perhaps) they no othcrwife eftecmed them 
then piftures indeed 5 yet as that of Am/ or Bel fit vp in memoricof Bdm the B4Ao 
man became afterwards the moft rcucrcnced IdolJ of the world, by which fo many 
Nations ( and they which were appropriate to God himfelfe ) were mifkd and caft 
away: fo-thofc very ftockes and ftones,and painted canuafes (called thepiftures of 
Cjirij'i,om-Ijtdie^m others; were by ■thoufands of ignorant people, not onclya- 
dorcd, but eftecmed to haue life, motion, and vndcrftanding. On fhefi jiockeswe c'ai 

(faith the ^ookco{'Hfedome)ivh e nwcpaffethroiighthera£ingwaHes,onthefel}ockes 
more rotten then the (hip that'eameth vs-. 

20 Th j s Heathen inuention of Images became fo fruitfull in after-times breeding 
anmhn.tcmuititudeof Gods, that they were forced to difunguiihthcm into de° 
grees and orders , as Dy Confentes, feu maiorim gentium h feleci,,Patrit»\ mfiemoresJu 
medtj.-Counfe/IwgCods, orGodsofthemightieftmbilit,e,felecJGods, Patrun Gods of 
marke,andcommon Gods (which the Romanes called CHedioxum) d» infimi mdterre- 
finall Heroes, and multitudes of other Gods: of which s, Augustine hath made 
large mention =m his ibookedeCmitete Bet. But ( faith Uclantins ) among all thofe JAM 
rniferablefoules and rotten bodies, worfhipped by men more like to theiridols did 
EpimmtdesCretenfs (by whxgood Angellmoue'dl knownot) erect in the Athe- 
nian fields, Altars to the vnknowne God, which flood with the fame title and dodi- 
30 canon eucn to the times of S.Paul: who made them firft knowe to whom thofe 
Altars belonged ,and opened their eics which were capable pfgrace.that they mieht 
difcerne the difference betwixt that light which iighteneth euery man , and the ob- 
fcure and ftinkmg m.ft wherein the Dcuill had fo many yeares led and milled them. 
And it fufficed not that themultkudc ofthefe Gods was fo great in generail.or that 
euene Nation had fome one which tooke particular and lingular careoftheni ; as/«- 
pter in Creete,lfsm <j£gypt,m Athens Minerva yn Samos Itmija PaphosVenus andfo of 
all other parts; but euery Citie,and almoft euery familie had a God a-part For as it 
is written in the fecond of kings: the men of Babel,made Smooth Benoth^A the men C W&& 
otC^*made^4and themen of/to^made^W,and the Awns made Nib- 

ti J' * n i '^ d *eJ^*toKf burnt their children in the fire to Adrwekcb,M& 
wfech^pkinly ^theKM^fWS^l^^i^etttaf'rmkaom n ' J AA- 
bume apart of them, make readte their meate , and ivarme themfelues by the fre thereof <■ ^ ' T> 
andoftherefidueheemaketh a God, an idol, and prayetb -unto it : but God hath (hut 
their eyes from fght.and their heartes from vnder (landing It is therefore fafeftfora ^ ' 
Cnnitan to belccuc thecommandements of God fo direct againft I dolatrie, to be- / 
lecue the Prophets.and to bclceue Saint Paul: who fpeaketh thus plamely and fee-/"*" 
\m$y.<J\tj belouedfie from idolatne,! fpeakeas -onto themwhich haue vnderflandim \ c ^ 
fudge yeeivhatlfay, J &> s 



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jfofcpb cont.Af- 



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Nto this Belus fucceedcd T^mas , the firft that commaunded the ct- 
crcifc of Idolatrie, the firft that iniurioufly inuadedhisneighbonr 
Princes; and the firft that without fhame or feare committed adult cry- 
in publique. Butas of Belus thercisnocertaine memorie (astouch- 
ing particulars-) fo of this Jtvinui (whole Story is gathered out of io 
prophane Aufhours) Ifinde nothing lb warrantable, but that the fame may bee 
difputed , and in the great eft part doubted. For although